Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Hausse (has) noun [ French] (Gun.) A kind of graduated breech sight for a small arm, or a cannon.

Haustellata (has`tĕl*lā"tȧ) noun plural [ New Latin , from haustellum , from Latin haurire , haustum , to draw water, to swallow. See Exhaust .] (Zoology) An artificial division of insects, including all those with a sucking proboscis.

Haustellate (has"tĕl*lat or has*tĕl"lat) adjective [ See Haustellata .] (Zoology) Provided with a haustellum, or sucking proboscis. -- noun One of the Haustellata.

Haustellum (has*tĕl"lŭm) noun ; plural Haustella (- lȧ). [ New Latin ] (Zoology) The sucking proboscis of various insects. See Lepidoptera , and Diptera .

Haustorium (-tō"rĭ*ŭm) noun ; plural Haustoria (- ȧ). [ Late Latin , a well, from Latin haurire , haustum , to drink.] (Botany) One of the suckerlike rootlets of such plants as the dodder and ivy. R. Brown.

Haut (hat) adjective [ French See Haughty .] Haughty. [ Obsolete] "Nations proud and haut ." Milton.

Hautboy (hō"boi) noun [ French hautbois , lit., high wood; haut high + bois wood. So called on account of its high tone. See Haughty , Bush ; and confer Oboe .]
1. (Mus.) A wind instrument, sounded through a reed, and similar in shape to the clarinet, but with a thinner tone. Now more commonly called oboe . See Illust. of Oboe .

2. (Botany) A sort of strawberry ( Fragaria elatior ).

Hautboyist (-ĭst) noun [ Confer French hautboïste .] A player on the hautboy.

Hautein (hō"tan) adjective [ See Haughty .]
1. Haughty; proud. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.

2. High; -- said of the voice or flight of birds. [ Obsolete]

Hauteur (hō`tẽr") noun [ French, from haut high. See Haughty .] Haughty manner or spirit; haughtiness; pride; arrogance.

Hautgoût (hō`gō") noun [ French] High relish or flavor; high seasoning.

Hautpas (hō`pä") noun [ French haut high + pas step.] A raised part of the floor of a large room; a platform for a raised table or throne. See Dais .

Havana (hȧ*văn"ȧ) adjective Of or pertaining to Havana, the capital of the island of Cuba; as, an Havana cigar ; -- formerly sometimes written Havannah . -- noun An Havana cigar.

Young Frank Clavering stole his father's Havannahs , and . . . smoked them in the stable.
Thackeray.

Havanese (hăv`ăn*ēz" or - ēs") adjective Of or pertaining to Havana, in Cuba. -- noun sing. & plural A native or inhabitant, or the people, of Havana.

Have (hăv) transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Had (hăd); present participle & verbal noun Having . Indic. present , I have , thou hast , he has ; we, ye, they have .] [ Middle English haven , habben , Anglo-Saxon habben (imperf. hæfde , past participle gehæfd ); akin to Old Saxon hebbian , Dutch hebben , OFries. hebba , Old High German habēn , German haben , Icelandic hafa , Swedish hafva , Danish have , Goth. haban , and probably to Latin habere , whence French avoir . Confer Able , Avoirdupois , Binnacle , Habit .]
1. To hold in possession or control; to own; as, he has a farm.

2. To possess, as something which appertains to, is connected with, or affects, one.

The earth hath bubbles, as the water has .
Shak.

He had a fever late.
Keats.

3. To accept possession of; to take or accept.

Break thy mind to me in broken English; wilt thou have me?
Shak.

4. To get possession of; to obtain; to get. Shak.

5. To cause or procure to be; to effect; to exact; to desire; to require.

I had the church accurately described to me.
Sir W. Scott.

Wouldst thou have me turn traitor also?
Ld. Lytton.

6. To bear, as young; as, she has just had a child.

7. To hold, regard, or esteem.

Of them shall I be had in honor.
2 Sam. vi. 22.

8. To cause or force to go; to take. "The stars have us to bed." Herbert. " Have out all men from me." 2 Sam. xiii. 9.

9. To take or hold (one's self); to proceed promptly; -- used reflexively, often with ellipsis of the pronoun; as, to have after one; to have at one or at a thing, i. e. , to aim at one or at a thing; to attack; to have with a companion. Shak.

10. To be under necessity or obligation; to be compelled; followed by an infinitive.

Science has , and will long have , to be a divider and a separatist.
M. Arnold.

The laws of philology have to be established by external comparison and induction.
Earle.

11. To understand.

You have me, have you not?
Shak.

12. To put in an awkward position; to have the advantage of; as, that is where he had him. [ Slang]

» Have , as an auxiliary verb, is used with the past participle to form preterit tenses; as, I have loved; I shall have eaten. Originally it was used only with the participle of transitive verbs, and denoted the possession of the object in the state indicated by the participle; as, I have conquered him , I have or hold him in a conquered state; but it has long since lost this independent significance, and is used with the participles both of transitive and intransitive verbs as a device for expressing past time. Had is used, especially in poetry, for would have or should have .

Myself for such a face had boldly died.
Tennyson.

To have a care , to take care; to be on one's guard. -- To have (a man) out , to engage (one) in a duel. -- To have done (with). See under Do , intransitive verb -- To have it out , to speak freely; to bring an affair to a conclusion. -- To have on , to wear. - - To have to do with . See under Do , transitive verb

Syn. -- To possess; to own. See Possess .

Haveless adjective Having little or nothing. [ Obsolete] Gower.

Havelock (hăv"e*lŏk) noun [ From Havelock , an English general distinguished in India in the rebellion of 1857.] A light cloth covering for the head and neck, used by soldiers as a protection from sunstroke.

Haven (hā"v'n) noun [ Anglo-Saxon hæfene ; akin to D. & LG. haven , German hafen , Middle High German habe , Danish havn , Icelandic höfn , Swedish hamn ; akin to English have , and hence orig., a holder; or to heave (see Heave ); or akin to Anglo-Saxon hæf sea, Icelandic & Swedish haf , Danish hav , which is perhaps akin to English heave .]
1. A bay, recess, or inlet of the sea, or the mouth of a river, which affords anchorage and shelter for shipping; a harbor; a port.

What shipping and what lading 's in our haven .
Shak.

Their haven under the hill.
Tennyson.

2. A place of safety; a shelter; an asylum. Shak.

The haven , or the rock of love.
Waller.

Haven transitive verb To shelter, as in a haven. Keats.

Havenage (-aj) noun Harbor dues; port dues.

Havened (hā"v'nd) p. adjective Sheltered in a haven.

Blissful havened both from joy and pain.
Keats.

Havener (hā"v'n*ẽr) noun A harbor master. [ Obsolete]

Haver (hăv"ẽr) noun A possessor; a holder. Shak.

Haver noun [ Dutch haver ; akin to German haber .] The oat; oats. [ Prov. Eng. & Scot.]

Haver bread , oaten bread. -- Haver cake , oaten cake. Piers Plowman. -- Haver grass , the wild oat. -- Haver meal , oatmeal.

Haver (hā"vẽr) intransitive verb [ Etymol. uncertain.] To maunder; to talk foolishly; to chatter. [ Scot.] Sir W. Scott.

Haversack (hăv"ẽr*săk) noun [ French havresac , German habersack , sack for oats. See 2d Haver , and Sack a bag.]


1. A bag for oats or oatmeal. [ Prov. Eng.]

2. A bag or case, usually of stout cloth, in which a soldier carries his rations when on a march; -- distinguished from knapsack .

3. A gunner's case or bag used to carry cartridges from the ammunition chest to the piece in loading.

Haversian (hȧ*vẽr"sh a n) adjective Pertaining to, or discovered by, Clopton Havers , an English physician of the seventeenth century.

Haversian canals (Anat.) , the small canals through which the blood vessels ramify in bone.

Havier noun [ Formerly haver , probably from Half ; confer Latin semimas emasculated, prop., half male.] A castrated deer.

Haviers , or stags which have been gelded when young, have no horns.
Encyc. of Sport.

Havildar (hăv`ĭl*där") noun In the British Indian armies, a noncommissioned officer of native soldiers, corresponding to a sergeant.

Havildar major , a native sergeant major in the East Indian army.

Having (hăv"ĭng) noun Possession; goods; estate.

I 'll lend you something; my having is not much.
Shak.

Havior (hāv"yẽr) noun [ Middle English havour , a corruption of Old French aveir , avoir , a having, of same origin as English aver a work horse. The h is due to confusion with English have .] Behavior; demeanor. [ Obsolete] Shak.

Havoc (hăv"ŏk) noun [ W. hafog devastation, havoc; or, if this be itself from English havoc , confer Middle English havot , or Anglo-Saxon hafoc hawk, which is a cruel or rapacious bird, or French hai, voux! a cry to hounds.] Wide and general destruction; devastation; waste.

As for Saul, he made havoc of the church.
Acts viii. 3.

Ye gods, what havoc does ambition make
Among your works!
Addison.

Havoc transitive verb To devastate; to destroy; to lay waste.

To waste and havoc yonder world.
Milton.

Havoc interj. [ See Havoc , noun ] A cry in war as the signal for indiscriminate slaughter. Toone.

Do not cry havoc , where you should but hunt
With modest warrant.
Shak.

Cry ' havoc ,' and let slip the dogs of war!
Shak.

Haw (ha) noun [ Middle English hawe , Anglo-Saxon haga ; akin to Dutch haag headge, German hag , hecke , Icelandic hagi pasture, Swedish hage , Danish have garden. √12. Confer Haggard , Ha-ha , Haugh , Hedge .]


1. A hedge; an inclosed garden or yard.

And eke there was a polecat in his haw .
Chaucer.

2. The fruit of the hawthorn. Bacon.

Haw noun [ Etymol. uncertain.] (Anat.) The third eyelid, or nictitating membrane. See Nictitating membrane , under Nictitate .

Haw noun [ Confer ha an interjection of wonder, surprise, or hesitation.] An intermission or hesitation of speech, with a sound somewhat like haw! also, the sound so made. "Hums or haws ." Congreve.

Haw intransitive verb To stop, in speaking, with a sound like haw ; to speak with interruption and hesitation.

Cut it short; don't prose -- don't hum and haw .
Chesterfield.

Haw intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Hawed (had); present participle & verbal noun Hawing .] [ Written also hoi .] [ Perhaps connected with here , hither ; confer , however, French huhau , hurhau , hue , interj. used in turning a horse to the right, German hott , , interj. used in calling to a horse.] To turn to the near side, or toward the driver; -- said of cattle or a team: a word used by teamsters in guiding their teams, and most frequently in the imperative. See Gee .

To haw and gee , or To haw and gee about , to go from one thing to another without good reason; to have no settled purpose; to be irresolute or unstable. [ Colloq.]

Haw transitive verb To cause to turn, as a team, to the near side, or toward the driver; as, to haw a team of oxen.

To haw and gee , or To haw and gee about , to lead this way and that at will; to lead by the nose; to master or control. [ Colloq.]

Haw-haw (ha*ha) noun [ Duplication of haw a hedge.] See Ha-ha .

Hawaiian (hȧ*wī"y a n) adjective Belonging to Hawaii or the Sandwich Islands, or to the people of Hawaii. -- noun A native of Hawaii.

Hawebake (ha"bāk`) noun Probably, the baked berry of the hawthorn tree, that is, coarse fare. See 1st Haw , 2. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.

Hawfinch (ha"fĭnch`) noun (Zoology) The common European grosbeak ( Coccothraustes vulgaris ); -- called also cherry finch , and coble .

Hawhaw intransitive verb [ Of imitative origin.] To laugh boisterously. [ Colloq. U. S.]

We haw-haw'd , I tell you, for more than half an hour.
Major Jack Downing.

Haüynite (ä"we*nīt) noun [ From the French mineralogist Haüy .] (Min.) A blue isometric mineral, characteristic of some volcanic rocks. It is a silicate of alumina, lime, and soda, with sulphate of lime.