sack

To bag purchases at the checkout. See bagger.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20108

Sack

Ancient Measurement Terms: Weight. Five fotmal (of lead).
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/measure.htm

sack

[n] - the quantity contained in a sack 2. [n] - any of various light dry strong white wine from Spain and Canary Islands (including sherry) 3. [n] - a woman`s full loose hiplength jacket 4. [n] - a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer`s purchases 5. [v] - plunder after capture, as of a town 6. [v] - put in a ...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=sack

Sack

An early English term for what is now called Sherry.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20673

Sack

Sack (s&scr;k) noun [ Middle English seck , French sec dry (cf. Spanish seco , Italian secco ), from Latin siccus dry, harsh; perhaps akin to Greek 'ischno`s , Sanskrit sikata sand, Ir. sesc dry, W. hysp . Confer Desiccate ....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/3

Sack

Sack noun [ Middle English sak , sek , Anglo-Saxon sacc , sæcc , Latin saccus , Greek sa`kkos from Hebrew sak ; confer French sac , from the Latin. Confer Sac , Satchel , Sack to plunder.] 1. A bag for hold...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/3

Sack

Sack transitive verb 1. To put in a sack; to bag; as, to sack corn. « Bolsters sacked in cloth, blue and crimson.» Latin Wallace. 2. To bear or carry in a sack upon the back or the shoulders. [ Colloq.]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/3

sack

To plunder or pillage, as a town or city; to devastate; to ravage. 'The Romans lay under the apprehension of seeing their city sacked by a barbarous enemy.' (Addison) ... Origin: See Sack pillage. ... 1. A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made of some kind of pliable material, as cloth, leather, and the like; a large pou...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

sack

poke noun a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer`s purchases
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=sack

sack

noun a woman`s full loose hiplength jacket
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=sack

Sack

• (n.) A measure of varying capacity, according to local usage and the substance. The American sack of salt is 215 pounds; the sack of wheat, two bushels. • (n.) A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made of some kind of pliable material, as cloth, leather, and the like; a large pouch. • (v. t.) To bear or ca...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/sack/

sack

(from the article `dress`) ...framework petticoat to define the shape of the skirt ( photograph). In the early decades this was a hoop skirt, circular in section and very full. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/3

Sack

Sack is slang for bed.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZS.HTM

Sack

[wine] Sack is an antiquated wine term referring to white fortified wine imported from mainland Spain or the Canary Islands. There was sack of different origins such as: The term Sherris sack later gave way to Sherry as the English term for fortified wine from Jerez. Since Sherry is practically the only one of these wines still widely expor...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sack_(wine)

Sack

To dismiss from a job.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary026.htm

Sack

An early English term for what is now called Sherry.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary092.htm

Sack

Sack is a dry sherry, which first found favour with the nobles in England during the Tudor period.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/QS.HTM

Sack

A quantity of cement: 94 Ibs. in the United States, 87.5 Ibs. in Canada, for portland or air entraining portland cement, or as indicated on the sack for other kinds of cement.
Found on http://www.moxie-intl.com/glossary.htm

sack

a tackle of the quarterback behind his line of scrimmage.
Found on http://www.firstbasesports.com/football_glossary.html

Sack

See Bag.
Found on http://www.pavement.com/glossary/A.html

sack

a traditional unit of weight, varying for different commodities shipped in sacks. In Britain, for example, the sack was a traditional measure for wool, fixed by Edward III at 364 pounds (26 stone) in 1340. In the U.S., a sack of salt is traditionally equal to 215 pounds, a sack of cotton 140 pounds, and a sack of flour 100 pounds. A sack of concret...
Found on http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictS.html

sack

tackling a ball carrier who intends to throw a forward pass. A sack is also awarded if a player forces a fumble of the ball, or the ball carrier to go out of bounds, behind the line of scrimmage on an apparent intended forward pass play. The term gained currency ca. 1970.
Found on http://www.instantactionsports.com/sportsbook/arena-football/arena-football

Sack

A sack was a British baker's unit of measurement equivalent to 20 stones or 2.5 hundred weight.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AS.HTM

Sack

General term for a wine fortified with alcohol (see Spriten ) From Spain and the Canary Islands In the 16th and 17 Century England was in use. On the Origin of the name, there are different versions, ultimately, was also blind to the origin of the name Champagne (See below). One of the variants is that the word from the French "sec" (dry)...
Found on http://www.wein-plus.eu/en/Bag_3.0.988.html

Sack

Sixteenth century name for Sherry wine.
Found on http://www.nebraskawines.com/wine-glossary/
No exact match found