Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Proprietor noun [ For older proprietary : confer French propriétarie .] One who has the legal right or exclusive title to anything, whether in possession or not; an owner; as, the proprietor of farm or of a mill.

Proprietorial adjective Of or pertaining to ownership; proprietary; as, proprietorial rights.

Proprietorship noun The state of being proprietor; ownership.

Proprietress noun A female proprietor.

Propriety noun ; plural Proprieties . [ French propriété , Latin proprietas , from proprius one's own, proper. See Property , Proper .]
1. Individual right to hold property; ownership by personal title; property. [ Obsolete] "Onles this propriety be exiled." Robynson (More's Utopia).

So are the proprieties of a wife to be disposed of by her lord, and yet all are for her provisions, it being a part of his need to refresh and supply hers.
Jer. Taylor.

2. That which is proper or peculiar; an inherent property or quality; peculiarity. [ Obsolete] Bacon.

We find no mention hereof in ancient zoögraphers, . . . who seldom forget proprieties of such a nature.
Sir T. Browne.

3. The quality or state of being proper; suitableness to an acknowledged or correct standard or rule; consonance with established principles, rules, or customs; fitness; appropriateness; as, propriety of behavior, language, manners, etc. "The rule of propriety ," Locke.

Proproctor noun [ Prefix pro- + proctor .] [ Eng. Univ.] A assistant proctor. Hook.

Props noun plural A game of chance, in which four sea shells, each called a prop , are used instead of dice.

Propterygium noun ; plural Propterygia . [ New Latin , from Greek ... before + ... a fin.] (Anat.) The anterior of three principal cartilages in the fins of some fishes. -- Prop`ter*yg"i*al adjective

Propugn transitive verb [ Latin propugnare ; pro for + pugnare to fight.] To contend for; to defend; to vindicate. [ Obsolete] Hammond.

Propugnacle noun [ Latin propugnaculum .] A fortress. [ Obsolete] Howell.

Propugnation noun [ Latin propugnatio .] Means of defense; defense. [ Obsolete] Shak.

Propugner noun A defender; a vindicator. "Zealous propugners ." Gov. of Tongue.

Propulsation noun [ Latin propulsatio . See Propulse .] The act of driving away or repelling; a keeping at a distance. [ Obsolete] Bp. Hall.

Propulse transitive verb [ Latin propulsare , v. intens. from propellere to propel. See Propel .] To repel; to drive off or away. [ Obsolete] Cotgrave.

Propulsion noun [ Confer French propulsion . See Propel .]
1. The act driving forward or away; the act or process of propelling; as, steam propulsion .

2. An impelling act or movement.

God works in all things; all obey
His first propulsion .
Whittier.

Propulsive adjective Tending, or having power, to propel; driving on; urging. "[ The] propulsive movement of the verse." Coleridge.

Propulsory adjective Propulsive.

Propyl noun [ Prop ionic + - yl .] (Chemistry) The hypothetical radical C 3 H 7 , regarded as the essential residue of propane and related compounds.

Propylene noun [ Confer French propylène .] (Chemistry) A colorless gaseous hydrocarbon (C 3 H 6 ) of the ethylene series, having a garlic odor. It occurs in coal gas, and is produced artificially in various ways. Called also propene .

Propylic adjective (Chemistry) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, propyl; as, propylic alcohol.

Propylidene noun (Chemistry) See Propidene .

Propylon noun ; plural Propyla . [ New Latin , from Greek ...; ... before + ... a gate.] (Anc. Arch.) The porch, vestibule, or entrance of an edifice.

Propylæum noun ; plural Propylæa . [ Latin , from Greek ...; ... before + ... a gate.] (Anc. Classical Arch.) Any court or vestibule before a building or leading into any inclosure.

Proratable adjective Capable of being prorated, or divided proportionately. [ U.S.]

Prorate transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Prorated ; present participle & verbal noun Prorating .] [ From Latin pro rata (sc. parte ) according to a certain part, in proportion.] To divide or distribute proportionally; to assess pro rata . [ U.S.]

Prore noun [ Latin prora , Greek ...: confer Italian & Spanish prora . See Prow , noun ] The prow or fore part of a ship. [ Poetic] "Galleys with vermilion prores ." Pope.

Prorector noun [ New Latin See Pro- , and Rector .] An officer who presides over the academic senate of a German university. Heyse.

Prorectorate noun The office of prorector.

Prorenal adjective [ Prefix pro- + renal .] (Anat.) Pronephric.

Proreption noun [ Latin prorepere , proreptum , to creep forth; pro + repere .] A creeping on.

Prorhinal adjective [ Prefix pro- + rhinal .] (Anat.) Situated in front of the nasal chambers.

Prorogate transitive verb To prorogue. [ R.]

Prorogation noun [ Latin prorogatio : confer French prorogation .]
1. The act of counting in duration; prolongation. [ Obsolete] South.

2. The act of proroguing; the ending of the session of Parliament, and postponing of its business, by the command of the sovereign. [ Eng.]

» After an adjournment all things continue as they were at the adjournment; whereas, after a prorogation , bill introduced and nut passed are as if they had never been begun at all. Mozley & W.

Prorogue transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Prorogued ; present participle & verbal noun Proroguing .] [ French proroger , Latin prorogare , prorogatum ; pro forward + rogare to ask, to ask one for his opinion or vote, or about a law. See Rogation .]
1. To protract; to prolong; to extend. [ Obsolete]

He prorogued his government.
Dryden.

2. To defer; to delay; to postpone; as, to prorogue death; to prorogue a marriage. Shak.

3. To end the session of a parliament by an order of the sovereign, thus deferring its business.

Parliament was prorogued to [ meet at] Westminster.
Bp. Hall.

The Parliament was again prorogued to a distant day.
Macaulay.

Syn. -- To adjourn; postpone; defer. See Adjourn .

Proruption noun [ Latin proruptio , from prorumpere , proruptum , to break forth; pro forth + rumpere to break.] The act or state of bursting forth; a bursting out. [ R.] Sir T. Browne.

Prosaic, Prosaical adjective [ Latin prosaius , from prosa prose: confer F,. prosaïque . See Prose .]
1. Of or pertaining to prose; resembling prose; in the form of prose; unpoetical; writing or using prose; as, a prosaic composition. Cudworth.

2. Dull; uninteresting; commonplace; unimaginative; prosy; as, a prosaic person. Ed. Rev.

-- Pro*sa"ic*al*ly , adverb -- Pro*sa"ic*al*ness , noun

Prosaicism noun The quality or state of being prosaic; a prosaic manner or style. [ R.] Poe.

Prosaism noun That which is in the form of prose writing; a prosaic manner. Coleridge.

Prosaist noun A writer of prose; an unpoetical writer. "An estimable prosaist ." I. Taylor.

Prosal adjective Of or pertaining to prose; prosaic. [ R.] Sir T. Browne.

Proscenium noun ; plural Proscenia . [ Latin , from Greek ...; ... before + ... a tent, a wooden stage, the stage. See Scene .]
1. (Anc. Theater) The part where the actors performed; the stage.

2. (Modern Theater) The part of the stage in front of the curtain; sometimes, the curtain and its framework.

Proscolex noun ; plural Proscolices . [ New Latin , from Greek ... before + ..., ..., a worm.] (Zoology) An early larval form of a trematode worm; a redia. See Redia .

Proscribe transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Proscribed ; present participle & verbal noun Proscribing .] [ Latin proscribere , proscriptum , to write before, to publish, proscribe; pro before + scribere to write. See Scribe . The sense of this word originated in the Roman practice of writing the names of persons doomed to death, and posting the list in public.]
1. To doom to destruction; to put out of the protection of law; to outlaw; to exile; as, Sylla and Marius proscribed each other's adherents.

Robert Vere, Earl of Oxford, . . . was banished the realm, and proscribed .
Spenser.

2. To denounce and condemn; to interdict; to prohibit; as, the Puritans proscribed theaters.

The Arian doctrines were proscribed and anathematized in the famous Council of Nice.
Waterland.

Proscriber noun One who, or that which, proscribes, denounces, or prohibits.

Proscript noun [ See Proscribe .]
1. A proscription; a prohibition; an interdict. [ R.]

2. One who is proscribed. [ R.]

Proscription noun [ Latin proscriptio : confer French proscription .]
1. The act of proscribing; a dooming to death or exile; outlawry; specifically, among the ancient Romans, the public offer of a reward for the head of a political enemy; as, under the triumvirate, many of the best Roman citizens fell by proscription .

Every victory by either party had been followed by a sanguinary proscription .
Macaulay.

2. The state of being proscribed; denunciation; interdiction; prohibition. Macaulay.

Proscriptional adjective Proscriptive.

Proscriptionist noun One who proscribes.

Proscriptive adjective Of or pertaining to proscription; consisting in, or of the nature of, proscription; proscribing. Burke. -- Pro*scrip"tive*ly , adverb