Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Expositor noun [ Latin See Expound .] One who, or that which, expounds or explains; an expounder; a commentator. Bp. Horsley.

Expository adjective Pertaining to, or containing, exposition; serving to explain; explanatory; illustrative; exegetical.

A glossary or expository index to the poetical writers.
Johnson.

Expostulate intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Expostulated; present participle & verbal noun Expostulating .] [ Latin expostulatus , past participle of expostulare to demand vehemently; ex out + postulare to ask, require. See Postulate .] To reason earnestly with a person on some impropriety of his conduct, representing the wrong he has done or intends, and urging him to make redress or to desist; to remonstrate; -- followed by with .

Men expostulate with erring friends; they bring accusations against enemies who have done them a wrong.
Jowett (Thuc. ).

Syn. -- To remonstrate; reason. See Remonstrate .

Expostulate transitive verb To discuss; to examine. [ Obsolete]

To expostulate
What majesty should be, what duty is.
Shak.

Expostulation noun [ Latin expostulatio .] The act of expostulating or reasoning with a person in opposition to some impropriety of conduct; remonstrance; earnest and kindly protest; dissuasion.

We must use expostulation kindly.
Shak.

Expostulator noun One who expostulates. Lamb.

Expostulatory adjective Containing expostulation or remonstrance; as, an expostulatory discourse or letter.

Exposture noun [ Confer Imposture .] Exposure. [ Obsolete] Shak.

Exposure noun [ From Expose .]
1. The act of exposing or laying open, setting forth, laying bare of protection, depriving of care or concealment, or setting out to reprobation or contempt.

The exposure of Fuller . . . put an end to the practices of that vile tribe.
Macaulay.

2. The state of being exposed or laid open or bare; openness to danger; accessibility to anything that may affect, especially detrimentally; as, exposure to observation, to cold, to inconvenience.

When we have our naked frailties hid,
That suffer in exposure .
Shak.

3. Position as to points of compass, or to influences of climate, etc. "Under a southern exposure ." Evelyn.

The best exposure of the two for woodcocks.
Sir. W. Scott.

4. (Photog.) The exposing of a sensitized plate to the action of light.

Expound (ĕks*pound") transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Expounded ; present participle & verbal noun Expounding .] [ Middle English exponen , expounen , expounden , from Latin exponere to set out, expose, expound; ex out + ponere to put: confer Middle English expondre , expondre . See Position .]
1. To lay open; to expose to view; to examine. [ Obsolete]

He expounded both his pockets.
Hudibras.

2. To lay open the meaning of; to explain; to clear of obscurity; to interpret; as, to expound a text of Scripture, a law, a word, a meaning, or a riddle.

Expound this matter more fully to me.
Bunyan.

Expounder (-ẽr) noun One who expounds or explains; an interpreter.

Express (ĕks*prĕs") adjective [ French exprès , Latin expressus , past participle of exprimere to express; ex . out + premere To press. See Press .]
1. Exactly representing; exact.

Their human countenance
The express resemblance of the gods.
Milton.

2. Directly and distinctly stated; declared in terms; not implied or left to inference; made unambiguous by intention and care; clear; not dubious; as, express consent; an express statement.

I have express commandment.
Shak.

3. Intended for a particular purpose; relating to an express; sent on a particular errand; dispatched with special speed; as, an express messenger or train. Also used adverbially.

A messenger sent express from the other world.
Atterbury.

Express color . (Law) See the Note under Color , noun , 8.

Syn. -- Explicit; clear; unambiguous. See Explicit .

Express noun [ Confer French exprès a messenger.]
1. A clear image or representation; an expression; a plain declaration. [ Obsolete]

The only remanent express of Christ's sacrifice on earth.
Jer. Taylor.

2. A messenger sent on a special errand; a courier; hence, a regular and fast conveyance; commonly, a company or system for the prompt and safe transportation of merchandise or parcels; also, a railway train for transporting passengers or goods with speed and punctuality.

3. An express office.

She charged him . . . to ask at the express if anything came up from town.
E. E. Hale.

4. That which is sent by an express messenger or message. [ Obsolete] Eikon Basilike.

Express office , an office where packages for an express are received or delivered.

Express transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Expressed; present participle & verbal noun Expressing .] [ Confer Old French espresser , expresser , Latin exprimere , expressum . See Express , adjective ; confer Sprain .]
1. To press or squeeze out; as, to express the juice of grapes, or of apples; hence, to extort; to elicit.

All the fruits out of which drink is expressed .
Bacon.

And th'idle breath all utterly expressed .
Spenser.

Halters and racks can not express from thee
More than by deeds.
B. Jonson.

2. To make or offer a representation of; to show by a copy or likeness; to represent; to resemble.

Each skillful artist shall express thy form.
E. Smith.

So kids and whelps their sires and dams express .
Dryden.

3. To give a true impression of; to represent and make known; to manifest plainly; to show in general; to exhibit, as an opinion or feeling, by a look, gesture, and esp. by language; to declare; to utter; to tell.

My words express my purpose.
Shak.

They expressed in their lives those excellent doctrines of morality.
Addison.

4. To make known the opinions or feelings of; to declare what is in the mind of; to show (one's self); to cause to appear; -- used reflexively.

Mr. Phillips did express with much indignation against me, one evening.
Pope.

5. To denote; to designate.

Moses and Aaron took these men, which are expressed by their names.
Num. i. 17.

6. To send by express messenger; to forward by special opportunity, or through the medium of an express; as, to express a package.

Syn. -- To declare; utter; signify; testify; intimate.

Express rifle A sporting rifle for use at short ranges, employing a large charge of powder and a light (short) bullet, giving a high initial velocity and consequently a flat trajectory. It is usually of moderately large caliber.

Express train Formerly, a railroad train run expressly for the occasion; a special train; now, a train run at express or special speed and making few stops.

Expressage (ĕks*prĕs"aj; 48) noun The charge for carrying a parcel by express.

Expressible (-ĭ*b'l) adjective Capable of being expressed, squeezed out, shown, represented, or uttered. -- Express"i*bly , adverb

Expression (ĕks*prĕsh"ŭn) noun [ Latin expressio : confer French expression .]
1. The act of expressing; the act of forcing out by pressure; as, the expression of juices or oils; also, of extorting or eliciting; as, a forcible expression of truth.

2. The act of declaring or signifying; declaration; utterance; as, an expression of the public will.

With this tone of philosophy were mingled expressions of sympathy.
Prescott.

3. Lively or vivid representation of meaning, sentiment, or feeling, etc.; significant and impressive indication, whether by language, appearance, or gesture; that manner or style which gives life and suggestive force to ideas and sentiments; as, he reads with expression ; her performance on the piano has expression .

The imitators of Shakespeare, fixing their attention on his wonderful power of expression , have directed their imitation to this.
M. Arnold.

4. That which is expressed by a countenance, a posture, a work of art, etc.; look, as indicative of thought or feeling. "The expression of an eye." Tennyson.

It still wore the majesty of expression so conspicuous in his portraits by the inimitable pencil of Titian.
Prescott.

5. A form of words in which an idea or sentiment is conveyed; a mode of speech; a phrase; as, a common expression ; an odd expression .

6. (Math.) The representation of any quantity by its appropriate characters or signs.

Past expression , Beyond expression , beyond the power of description. " Beyond expression bright." Milton.

Expressional (- a l) adjective Of, or relating to, expression; phraseological; also, vividly representing or suggesting an idea or sentiment. Fitzed. Hall. Ruskin.

Expressionless adjective Destitute of expression.

Expressive adjective [ Confer French expressif .]
1. Serving to express, utter, or represent; indicative; communicative; -- followed by of ; as, words expressive of his gratitude.

Each verse so swells expressive of her woes.
Tickell.

2. Full of expression; vividly representing the meaning or feeling meant to be conveyed; significant; emphatic; as, expressive looks or words.

You have restrained yourself within the list of too cold an adieu; be more expressive to them.
Shak.

Through her expressive eyes her soul distinctly spoke.
Littelton.

-- Ex*press"ive*ly , adverb -- Ex*press"ive*ness , noun

Expressly adverb In an express manner; in direct terms; with distinct purpose; particularly; as, a book written expressly for the young.

The word of the Lord came expressly unto Ezekiel.
Ezek. i. 3.

I am sent expressly to your lordship.
Shak.

Expressman (-m a n) noun ; plural Expressmen (-m e n). A person employed in the express business; also, the driver of a job wagon. W. D. Howells.

Expressness noun The state or quality of being express; definiteness. [ Obsolete] Hammond.

Expressure noun The act of expressing; expression; utterance; representation. [ Obsolete]

An operation more divine
Than breath or pen can give expressure to.
Shak.

Exprobrate transitive verb [ Latin exprobratus , past participle of exprobrare ; ex out + probrum a shameful or disgraceful act.] To charge upon with reproach; to upbraid. [ R.] Sir T. Browne.

Exprobration noun [ Latin exprobration : confer French exprobration .] Reproachful accusation; upbraiding. [ Obsolete]

A fearful exprobration of our unworthiness.
Jer. Taylor.

Exprobrative, Exprobratory adjective Expressing reproach; upbraiding; reproachful. [ R.] Sir A. Shirley.

Expropriate transitive verb [ Latin ex out, from + proprius one's own: confer French exproprier .] To put out of one's possession; to surrender the ownership of; also, to deprive of possession or proprietary rights. Boyle.

Expropriate these [ bad landlords] as the monks were expropriated by Act of Parliament.
M. Arnold.

Expropriation noun [ Confer French expropriation .] The act of expropriating; the surrender of a claim to exclusive property; the act of depriving of ownership or proprietary rights. W. Montagu.

The expropriation of bad landlords.
M. Arnold.

Expugn (ĕks*pūn") transitive verb [ Latin expugnare ; ex out + pugnare to fight, pugna fight. Confer Impugn .] To take by assault; to storm; to overcome; to vanquish; as, to expugn cities; to expugn a person by arguments.

Expugnable (ĕks*pŭg"nȧ*b'l) adjective [ Latin expugnabilis .] Capable of being expugned.

Expugnation noun [ Latin expugnatio .] The act of taking by assault; conquest. [ R.] Sandys.

Expugner noun One who expugns.

Expulse transitive verb [ French expulser or Latin expulsare , intens. from expellere . See Expel .] To drive out; to expel. [ Obsolete]

If charity be thus excluded and expulsed .
Milton.

Expulser noun An expeller. [ Obsolete] Cotgrave.

Expulsion noun [ Latin expulsio , from expellere : confer French expulsion . See Expel .]
1. The act of expelling; a driving or forcing out; summary removal from membership, association, etc.

The expulsion of the Tarquins.
Shak.

2. The state of being expelled or driven out.

Expulsive adjective [ Confer French expulsif .] Having the power of driving out or away; serving to expel.

The expulsive power of a new affection.
Chalmers.

Expunction noun [ Latin expunctio execution, performance, from expungere . See Expunge .] The act of expunging or erasing; the condition of being expunged. Milton.

Expunge (ĕks*pŭnj") transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Expunged (- pŭnjd"); present participle & verbal noun Expunging (- pŭn"jĭng).] [ Latin expungere , expunctum , prick out, expunge, settle an account, execute; ex out + pungere to prick, puncture. See Pungent. ]
1. To blot out, as with pen; to rub out; to efface designedly; to obliterate; to strike out wholly; as, to expunge words, lines, or sentences.

2. To strike out; to wipe out or destroy; to annihilate; as, to expunge an offense. Sandys.

Expunge the whole, or lop th' excrescent parts.
Pope.

Syn. -- To efface; erase; obliterate; strike out; destroy; annihilate; cancel.

Expurgate (ĕks"pŭr*gāt or ĕks*pûr"gāt; 277) transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Expurgated (- gā"tĕd); present participle & verbal noun Expurgating (-gā"tĭng).] [ Latin expurgatus , past participle of expurgare to purge, purify; ex out, from + purgare to cleanse, purify, purge. See Purge , and confer Spurge .] To purify; to clear from anything noxious, offensive, or erroneous; to cleanse; to purge; as, to expurgate a book.

Expurgation noun [ Latin expurgatio justification, excuse: confer French expurgation .] The act of expurgating, purging, or cleansing; purification from anything noxious, offensive, sinful, or erroneous. Milton.

Expurgator noun One who expurgates or purifies.

Expurgatorial adjective Tending or serving to expurgate; expurgatory. Milman.

Expurgatorious adjective Expurgatory. [ Obsolete] " Expurgatorious indexes." Milton.

Expurgatory adjective [ Confer French expurgatoire .] Serving to purify from anything noxious or erroneous; cleansing; purifying. " Expurgatory animadversions." Sir T. Browne.

Expurgatory Index . See Index Expurgatorius , under Index .

Expurge transitive verb [ Confer Old French espurgier . See Expurgate .] To purge away. [ Obsolete] Milton.

Exquire transitive verb [ Latin exquirere . See Exquisite .] To search into or out. [ Obsolete] Chapman.