Index

A composite of stocks, bonds or other securities selected to represent a specific market, industry or asset class. Examples include: the S&P 500

INDEX

INDEX, an acronym for Information through Disguised Experimentation is an annual market research fair conducted by the students of IIM-Lucknow. Students create games and various other simulated environments, to capture consumers’ subconscious thoughts. This innovative method of market research removes the sensitization effect that might bias peo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/INDEX

Index

The interest rate or adjustment standard that determines the changes in monthly payments for an adjustable rate loan.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Index

(1) the proportional relation of counts of objects or signs associated with a given species to counts of that species on a given area; (2) counts of individuals (e.g., at a feeding station) reflecting changes in relative abundance on a specified or local area (Ralph 1980:578).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21070

Index

(1) the proportional relation of counts of objects or signs associated with a given species to counts of that species on a given area; (2) counts of individuals (e.g., at a feeding station) reflecting changes in relative abundance on a specified or local area (Ralph 1981:578).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22030

Index

(1) the proportional relation of counts of objects or signs associated with a given species to counts of that species on a given area; (2) counts of individuals (e.g., at a feeding station) reflecting changes in relative abundance on a specified or local area (Ralph 1981578).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22216

Index

(from the article `Encyclopædia Britannica`) ...by a major revision of the 15th edition for 1985. For that printing, the Macropædia was greatly restructured, with the amalgamation and regrouping ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/16

index

(from the article `Poole, William Frederick`) American bibliographer and library administrator whose indexing of periodicals became authoritative.Undoubtedly the major adjunct of the modern encyclopaedia is its index. As early as 1614 the bishop of Petina, Antonio Zara, included an index of a ... ...became possible to access a random d...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/16

index

(from the article `semiotics`) ...and one of his major contributions to semiotics was the categorization of signs into three main types: (1) an icon, which resembles its referent ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/16

index

(from the article `stochastic process`) ...example, in radioactive decay every atom is subject to a fixed probability of breaking down in any given time interval. More generally, a ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/16

index

(in´deks) pl. indexes, in´dices the numerical ratio of measurement of any part in comparison with a fixed standard. forefinger.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Index

(Lat. indicare, to indicate) A directing sign; that which indicates. Employed by C. S. Peirce (1839-1914) in logic, or semiotic, as that sign which refers to an object by virtue of being affected by it. See Sign. -- J.K.F.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/i.html

index

[n] - a numerical scale used to compare variables with one another or with some reference number 2. [n] - a number or ratio (a value on a scale of measurement) derived from a series of observed facts 3. [n] - an alphabetical listing of names and topics along with page numbers where they are discussed 4. [n] - the finger next to t...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=index

Index

• (n.) That which guides, points out, informs, or directs; a pointer or a hand that directs to anything, as the hand of a watch, a movable finger on a gauge, scale, or other graduated instrument. In printing, a sign used to direct particular attention to a note or paragraph; -- called also fist. • (n.) The second digit, that next pollex, ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/index/

index

indicant noun a number or ratio (a value on a scale of measurement) derived from a series of observed facts; can reveal relative changes as a function of time
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=index

index

index finger noun the finger next to the thumb
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=index

index

(economics) In economics, an indicator of a general movement in wages and prices over a specified period
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012011.html

index

(mathematics) In mathematics, another term for exponent, the number that indicates the power to which a term should be raised
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0028759.html

Index

[economics] In economics and finance, an index is a statistical measure of changes in a representative group of individual data points. These data may be derived from any number of sources, including company performance, prices, productivity, and employment. Economic indices (index, plural) track economic health from different perspectives....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index_(economics)

Index

[publishing] An index (plural: usually indexes, see below) is a list of words or phrases (`headings`) and associated pointers (`locators`) to where useful material relating to that heading can be found in a document. In a traditional back-of-the-book index the headings will include names of people, places and events, and concepts selected b...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index_(publishing)

Index

[statistics] In statistics and research design, an index is a composite statistic - a measure of changes in a representative group of individual data points, or in other words, a compound measure that aggregates multiple indicators. Indexes summarize and rank specific observations. Much data in the field of social sciences is represented in...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index_(statistics)

Index

[typography] The symbol ☞ is a punctuation mark, called an index, manicule (from the Latin root manus for `hand` and manicula for `little hand`) or fist. Other names for the symbol include printer`s fist, bishop`s fist, digit, mutton-fist, hand, hand director, pointer, and pointing hand. ==History== Though rare today, this symbol was in c...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index_(typography)

Index

[UK] Index is a catalogue retailer in the United Kingdom, that was owned by Littlewoods from 1985 until 2005. Many Index stores were attached to Littlewoods stores. It was a well-known retailer in the 1980s and the 1990s, but after sales began to decline in the 2000s, its popularity became disputable and it started losing many customers to ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Index_(UK)

Index

In'dex noun ; plural English Indexes , Latin Indices [ Latin : confer French index . See Indicate , Diction .] 1. That which points out; that which shows, indicates, manifests, or discloses. « Tastes are the indexes of the different qua...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/42

Index

In'dex transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Indexed ; present participle & verbal noun Indexing .] To provide with an index or table of references; to put into an index; as, to index a book, or its contents.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/42
No exact match found