Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Incompetent adjective [ Latin incompetens : confer French incompétent . See In- not, and Competent .]


1. Not competent; wanting in adequate strength, power, capacity, means, qualifications, or the like; incapable; unable; inadequate; unfit.

Incompetent to perform the duties of the place.
Macaulay.

2. (Law) Wanting the legal or constitutional qualifications; inadmissible; as, a person professedly wanting in religious belief is an incompetent witness in a court of law or equity; incompetent evidence.

Richard III. had a resolution, out of hatred to his brethren, to disable their issues, upon false and incompetent pretexts, the one of attainder, the other of illegitimation.
Bacon.

3. Not lying within one's competency, capacity, or authorized power; not permissible.

Syn. -- Incapable; unable; inadequate; insufficient; inefficient; disqualified; unfit; improper. -- Incompetent , Incapable . Incompetent is a relative term, denoting a want of the requisite qualifications for performing a given act, service, etc.; incapable is absolute in its meaning, denoting want of power, either natural or moral. We speak of a man as incompetent to a certain task, of an incompetent judge, etc. We say of an idiot that he is incapable of learning to read; and of a man distinguished for his honor, that he is incapable of a mean action.

Incompetently adverb In an competent manner; inadequately; unsuitably.

Incompetibility noun See Incompatibility .

Incompetible adjective See Incompatible .

Incomplete adjective [ Latin incompletus : confer French incomplet . See In- not, and Complete .]


1. Not complete; not filled up; not finished; not having all its parts, or not having them all adjusted; imperfect; defective.

A most imperfect and incomplete divine.
Milton.

2. (Botany) Wanting any of the usual floral organs; -- said of a flower.

Incomplete equation (Alg.) , an equation some of whose terms are wanting; or one in which the coefficient of some one or more of the powers of the unknown quantity is equal to 0.

Incompletely adverb In an incomplete manner.

Incompleteness noun The state of being incomplete; imperfectness; defectiveness. Boyle.

Incompletion noun Want of completion; incompleteness. Smart.

Incomplex adjective [ Prefix in- not + complex : confer French incomplexe .] Not complex; uncompounded; simple. Barrow.

Incompliable adjective Not compliable; not conformable.

Incompliance noun
1. The quality or state of being incompliant; unyielding temper; obstinacy.

Self-conceit produces peevishness and incompliance of humor in things lawful and indifferent.
Tillotson.

2. Refusal or failure to comply. Strype.

Incompliant adjective Not compliant; unyielding to request, solicitation, or command; stubborn. -- In`com*pli"ant*ly , adverb

Incomposed adjective Disordered; disturbed. [ Obsolete] Milton. -- In`com*po"sed*ly adverb [ Obsolete] -- In`com*pos"ed*ness , noun [ Obsolete]

Incomposite adjective [ Latin incompositus . See Composite .] Not composite; uncompounded; simple.

Incomposite numbers . See Prime numbers , under Prime .

Incompossible adjective [ Prefix in- not + compossible : confer French incompossible .] Not capable of joint existence; incompatible; inconsistent. [ Obsolete]

Ambition and faith . . . are . . . incompossible .
Jer. Taylor.

-- In`com*pos`si*bil"i*ty noun [ Obsolete]

Incomprehense adjective [ Latin incomprehensus .] Incomprehensible. [ Obsolete] " Incomprehense in virtue." Marston.

Incomprehensibility noun [ Confer French incompréhensibilité .] The quality of being incomprehensible, or beyond the reach of human intellect; incomprehensibleness; inconceivability; inexplicability.

The constant, universal sense of all antiquity unanimously confessing an incomprehensibility in many of the articles of the Christian faith.
South.

Incomprehensible adjective [ Latin incomprehensibilis : confer French incompréhensible . See In- not, and Comprehensible .]


1. Not capable of being contained within limits.

An infinite and incomprehensible substance.
Hooker.

2. Not capable of being comprehended or understood; beyond the reach of the human intellect; inconceivable.

And all her numbered stars that seem to roll
Spaces incomprehensible .
Milton.

-- In*com`pre*hen"si*ble*ness , noun -- In*com`pre*hen"si*bly , adverb

Incomprehension noun Want of comprehension or understanding. "These mazes and incomprehensions ." Bacon.

Incomprehensive adjective Not comprehensive; not capable of including or of understanding; not extensive; limited. -- In*com`pre*hen"sive*ly , adjective Sir W. Hamilton. -- In*com`pre*hen"sive*ness , noun T. Warton.

Incompressibility noun [ Confer French incompressibilité .] The quality of being incompressible, or incapable of reduction in volume by pressure; -- formerly supposed to be a property of liquids.

The incompressibility of water is not absolute.
Rees.

Incompressible adjective [ Prefix in- not + compressible : confer French incompressible .] Not compressible; incapable of being reduced by force or pressure into a smaller compass or volume; resisting compression; as, many liquids and solids appear to be almost incompressible . -- In`com*press"i*ble*ness , noun

Incomputable adjective Not computable.

Inconcealable adjective Not concealable. " Inconcealable imperfections." Sir T. Browne.

Inconceivability noun The quality of being inconceivable; inconceivableness.

The inconceivability of the Infinite.
Mansel.

Inconceivable adjective [ Prefix in- not + conceivable : confer French inconcevable .] Not conceivable; incapable of being conceived by the mind; not explicable by the human intellect, or by any known principles or agencies; incomprehensible; as, it is inconceivable to us how the will acts in producing muscular motion.

It is inconceivable to me that a spiritual substance should represent an extended figure.
Locke.

-- In`con*ceiv"a*ble*ness , noun -- In`con*ceiv"a*bly , adverb

The inconceivableness of a quality existing without any subject to possess it.
A. Tucker.

Inconceptible adjective Inconceivable. [ Obsolete] Sir M. Hale.

Inconcerning adjective Unimportant; trifling. [ Obsolete] "Trifling and inconcerning matters." Fuller.

Inconcinne adjective [ See Inconcinnous .] Dissimilar; incongruous; unsuitable. [ Obsolete] Cudworth.

Inconcinnity noun [ Latin inconcinnitas .] Want of concinnity or congruousness; unsuitableness.

There is an inconcinnity in admitting these words.
Trench.

Inconcinnous adjective [ Latin inconcinnus . See In- not, and Concinnity .] Not concinnous; unsuitable; discordant. [ Obsolete] Cudworth.

Inconcludent adjective Not inferring a conclusion or consequence; not conclusive. [ Obsolete]

Inconcluding adjective Inferring no consequence. [ Obsolete]

Inconclusive adjective Not conclusive; leading to no conclusion; not closing or settling a point in debate, or a doubtful question; as, evidence is inconclusive when it does not exhibit the truth of a disputed case in such a manner as to satisfy the mind, and put an end to debate or doubt.

Arguments . . . inconclusive and impertinent.
South.

-- In`con*clu"sive*ly , adverb -- In`con*clu"sive*ness , noun

Inconcoct adjective [ Latin prefix in- not + concoctus , past participle of concoquere . See Concoct .] Inconcocted. [ Obsolete]

Inconcocted adjective [ Prefix in- not + concocted .] Imperfectly digested, matured, or ripened. [ Obsolete] Bacon.

Inconcoction noun The state of being undigested; unripeness; immaturity. [ Obsolete] Bacon.

Inconcrete adjective [ Latin inconcretus incorporeal.] Not concrete. [ R.] Latin Andrews.

Inconcurring adjective Not concurring; disagreeing. [ R.] Sir T. Browne.

Inconcussible adjective [ Prefix in- not + Latin concussibilis that can be shaken. See Concussion .] Not concussible; that cannot be shaken.

Incondensability, Incondensibility noun The quality or state of being incondensable.

Incondensable, Incondensible adjective Not condensable; incapable of being made more dense or compact, or reduced to liquid form.

Incondite adjective [ Latin inconditus ; prefix in- not + conditus , past participle of condere to put or join together. See Condition .] Badly put together; inartificial; rude; unpolished; irregular. "Carol incondite rhymes." J. Philips.

Inconditional adjective [ Prefix in- not + conditional : confer French inconditionnel .] Unconditional. [ Obsolete] Sir T. Browne.

Inconditionate adjective [ Prefix in- not + conditionate : confer French inconditionné .] Not conditioned; not limited; absolute. [ Obsolete] Boyle.

Inconform adjective [ Prefix in- not + conform .] Unconformable. [ Obsolete] Gauden.

Inconformable adjective Unconformable. [ Obsolete]

Inconformity noun [ Confer French inconformité .] Want of conformity; nonconformity. [ Obsolete]

Inconfused adjective Not confused; distinct. [ Obsolete]

Inconfusion noun Freedom from confusion; distinctness. [ Obsolete] Bacon.