Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Incicurable adjective [ Latin incicur not tame; prefix in- not + cicur name.] Untamable. [ R.]

Incide transitive verb [ Latin incidere ; prefix in- in + caedere to cut. See Concise , and confer Incise .] To cut; to separate and remove; to resolve or break up, as by medicines. [ Obsolete] Arbuthnot.

Incidence noun [ Confer French incidence .]


1. A falling on or upon; an incident; an event. [ Obsolete] Bp. Hall.

2. (Physics) The direction in which a body, or a ray of light or heat, falls on any surface.

In equal incidences there is a considerable inequality of refractions.
Sir I. Newton.

Angle of incidence , the angle which a ray of light, or the line of incidence of a body, falling on any surface, makes with a perpendicular to that surface; also formerly, the complement of this angle. -- Line of incidence , the line in the direction of which a surface is struck by a body, ray of light, and the like.

Incidency noun Incidence. [ Obsolete] Shak.

Incident adjective [ Latin incidens , -entis , present participle & of incidere to fall into or upon; prefix in- in, on + cadere to fall: confer French incident . See Cadence .]


1. Falling or striking upon, as a ray of light upon a reflecting surface.

2. Coming or happening accidentally; not in the usual course of things; not in connection with the main design; not according to expectation; casual; fortuitous.

As the ordinary course of common affairs is disposed of by general laws, so likewise men's rarer incident necessities and utilities should be with special equity considered.
Hooker.

3. Liable to happen; apt to occur; befalling; hence, naturally happening or appertaining.

All chances incident to man's frail life.
Milton.

The studies incident to his profession.
Milward.

4. (Law) Dependent upon, or appertaining to, another thing, called the principal .

Incident proposition (Logic) , a proposition subordinate to another, and introduced by who , which , whose , whom , etc.; as, Julius, whose surname was Cæsar , overcame Pompey. I. Watts.

Incident noun [ Confer French incident .]
1. That which falls out or takes place; an event; casualty; occurrence.

2. That which happens aside from the main design; an accidental or subordinate action or event.

No person, no incident , in a play but must be of use to carry on the main design.
Dryden.

3. (Law) Something appertaining to, passing with, or depending on, another, called the principal . Tomlins.

Syn. -- Circumstance; event; fact; adventure; contingency; chance; accident; casualty. See Event .

Incidental adjective Happening, as an occasional event, without regularity; coming without design; casual; accidental; hence, not of prime concern; subordinate; collateral; as, an incidental conversation; an incidental occurrence; incidental expenses.

By some, religious duties . . . appear to be regarded . . . as an incidental business.
Rogers.

Syn. -- Accidental; casual; fortuitous; contingent; chance; collateral. See Accidental .

-- In`ci*den"tal*ly , adverb -- In`ci*den"tal*ness , noun

I treat either or incidentally of colors.
Boyle.

Incidental noun An incident; that which is incidental; esp., in the plural, an aggregate of subordinate or incidental items not particularized; as, the expense of tuition and incidentals . Pope.

Incidently adverb Incidentally. [ Obsolete]

Incinerable adjective Capable of being incinerated or reduced to ashes. Sir T. Browne.

Incinerate [ Late Latin incineratus , past participle of incinerare to incinerate; Latin prefix in- in + cinis , cineris , ashes.] Reduced to ashes by burning; thoroughly consumed. [ Obsolete] Bacon.

Incinerate transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Incinerated ; present participle & verbal noun Incinerating .] To burn to ashes; to consume; to burn. Bacon.

It is the fire only that incinerates bodies.
Boyle.

Incineration noun [ Late Latin incineratio : confer French incinération .] The act of incinerating, or the state of being incinerated; cremation.

The phenix kind,
Of whose incineration ,
There riseth a new creation.
Skelton.

Incipience, Incipiency noun [ Latin incipientia .] Beginning; commencement; incipient state.

Incipient adjective [ Latin incipiens , present participle of incipere to begin. See Inception .] Beginning to be, or to show itself; commencing; initial; as, the incipient stage of a fever; incipient light of day. -- In*cip"i*ent*ly , adverb

Incircle transitive verb See Encircle .

Incirclet noun [ Confer Encirclet .] A small circle. [ Obsolete] Sir P. Sidney.

Incircumscriptible adjective [ Prefix in- not + circumscriptible : confer Late Latin incircumscriptibilis .] Incapable of being circumscribed or limited. Cranmer.

Incircumscription noun Condition or quality of being incircumscriptible or limitless. Jer. Taylor.

Incircumspect adjective [ Prefix in- not + circumspect .] Not circumspect; heedless; careless; reckless; impolitic. Tyndale.

Incircumspection noun [ Confer French incirconspection .] Want of circumspection. Sir T. Browne.

Incise transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Incised ; present participle & verbal noun Incising .] [ Latin incisus , past participle of incidere to incise: confer French inciser . See Incide .]


1. To cut in or into with a sharp instrument; to carve; to engrave.

I on thy grave this epitaph incise .
T. Carew.

2. To cut, gash, or wound with a sharp instrument; to cut off.

Incised adjective
1. Cut in; carved; engraved.

2. (Botany) Having deep and sharp notches, as a leaf or a petal.

Incisely adverb In an incised manner.

Incision noun [ Latin incisio : confer French incision . See Incise .]


1. The act of incising, or cutting into a substance. Milton.

2. That which is produced by incising; the separation of the parts of any substance made by a cutting or pointed instrument; a cut; a gash.

3. Separation or solution of viscid matter by medicines. [ Obsolete]

Incisive adjective [ Confer French incisif .]


1. Having the quality of incising, cutting, or penetrating, as with a sharp instrument; cutting; hence, sharp; acute; sarcastic; biting. "An incisive , high voice." G. Eliot.

And her incisive smile accrediting
That treason of false witness in my blush.
Mrs. Browning.

2. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the incisors; incisor; as, the incisive bones, the premaxillaries.

Incisor noun [ New Latin ] (Anat.) One of the teeth in front of the canines in either jaw; an incisive tooth. See Tooth .

Incisor adjective Adapted for cutting; of or pertaining to the incisors; incisive; as, the incisor nerve; an incisor foramen; an incisor tooth.

Incisory adjective Having the quality of cutting; incisor; incisive.

Incisure noun [ Latin incisura : confer French incisure .] A cut; an incision; a gash. Derham.

Incitant adjective [ Latin incitans , -antis , present participle of incitare . See Incite .] Inciting; stimulating.

Incitant noun That which incites; an inciting agent or cause; a stimulant. E. Darwin.

Incitation noun [ Latin incitatio : confer French incitation .]


1. The act of inciting or moving to action.

2. That which incites to action; that which rouses or prompts; incitement; motive; incentive.

The noblest incitation to honest attempts.
Tatler.

Incitative noun A provocative; an incitant; a stimulant. [ R.] Jervas.

Incite transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Incited ; present participle & verbal noun Inciting .] [ Latin incitare ; prefix in- in + citare to rouse, stir up: confer French inciter . See Cite .] To move to action; to stir up; to rouse; to spur or urge on.

Anthiochus, when he incited Prusias to join in war, set before him the greatness of the Romans.
Bacon.

No blown ambition doth our arms incite .
Shak.

Syn. -- Excite; stimulate; instigate; spur; goad; arouse; move; urge; rouse; provoke; encourage; prompt; animate. See Excite .

Incitement noun [ Confer French incitement .]


1. The act of inciting.

2. That which incites the mind, or moves to action; motive; incentive; impulse. Burke.

From the long records of a distant age,
Derive incitements to renew thy rage.
Pope.

Syn. -- Motive; incentive; spur; stimulus; impulse; encouragement.

Inciter noun One who, or that which, incites.

Incitingly adverb So as to incite or stimulate.

Incito-motor adjective [ Latin incitus incited + English motor .] (Physiol.) Inciting to motion; -- applied to that action which, in the case of muscular motion, commences in the nerve centers, and excites the muscles to contraction. Opposed to excito-motor .

Incito-motory adjective (Physiol.) Incitomotor.

Incivil adjective [ Latin incivilis ; prefix in- not + civilis civil: confer French incivil .] Uncivil; rude. [ Obsolete] Shak.

Incivility noun ; plural Incivilities . [ Latin incivilitas : confer French incivilité .]


1. The quality or state of being uncivil; want of courtesy; rudeness of manner; impoliteness. Shak. Tillotson.

2. Any act of rudeness or ill breeding.

Uncomely jests, loud talking and jeering, which, in civil account, are called indecencies and incivilities .
Jer. Taylor.

3. Want of civilization; a state of rudeness or barbarism. [ R.] Sir W. Raleigh.

Syn. -- Impoliteness; uncourteousness; unmannerliness; disrespect; rudeness; discourtesy.

Incivilization noun [ Prefix in- not + civilization .] The state of being uncivilized; want of civilization; barbarism.

Incivilly adverb Uncivilly. [ Obsolete] Shak.

Incivism noun [ Prefix in- not + civism : confer French incivisme .] Want of civism; want of patriotism or love to one's country; unfriendliness to one's state or government. [ R.] Macaulay.

Inclamation noun [ Latin inclamatio . See 1st In- , and Claim .] Exclamation. [ Obsolete] Bp. Hall.

Inclasp transitive verb [ Prefix in- in + clasp . Confer Enclasp .] To clasp within; to hold fast to; to embrace or encircle. [ Written also enclasp .]

The flattering ivy who did ever see
Inclasp the huge trunk of an aged tree.
F. Beaumont.

Inclaudent adjective Not closing or shutting.

Inclavated adjective [ Late Latin inclavatus ; Latin prefix in- in + clavare to fasten with nails, from clavus nail.] Set; fast; fixed. Dr. John Smith.

Inclave adjective [ See Inclavated .] (Her.) Resembling a series of dovetails; -- said of a line of division, such as the border of an ordinary.