Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Word starts with Word or meaning contains
Incognoscible adjective Incognizable. -- In`cog*nos"ci*bil"i*ty noun

Incoherence, Incoherency noun [ Confer French incohérence .]


1. The quality or state of being incoherent; want of coherence; want of cohesion or adherence. Boyle.

2. Want of connection; incongruity; inconsistency; want of agreement or dependence of one part on another; as, the incoherence of arguments, facts, etc.

Incoherences in matter, and suppositions without proofs, put handsomely together, are apt to pass for strong reason.
Locke.

3. That which is incoherent.

Crude incoherencies . . . and nauseous tautologies.
South.

Incoherent adjective [ Prefix in- not + coherent : confer French incohérent .]


1. Not coherent; wanting cohesion; loose; unconnected; physically disconnected; not fixed to each; -- said of material substances. Woodward.

2. Wanting coherence or agreement; incongruous; inconsistent; having no dependence of one part on another; logically disconnected. "The same rambling, incoherent manner." Bp. Warburton.

Incoherentific adjective [ English incoherent + Latin facere to make.] Causing incoherence. [ R.]

Incoherently adverb In an incoherent manner; without due connection of parts.

Incoherentness noun Incoherence.

Incoincidence noun The quality of being incoincident; want of coincidence. [ R.]

Incoincident adjective Not coincident; not agreeing in time, in place, or principle.

Incolumity noun [ Latin incolumitas , from incolumis uninjured, safe; perhaps from in intens. + (doubtful) columis safe.] Safety; security. [ Obsolete] Howell.

Incomber transitive verb See Encumber .

Incombine intransitive verb To be incapable of combining; to disagree; to differ. [ Obsolete] Milton.

Incombustibility noun [ Confer French incombustilité .] The quality of being incombustible.

Incombustible adjective [ Prefix in- not + combustible : confer French incombustible .] Not combustible; not capable of being burned, decomposed, or consumed by fire; uninflammable; as, asbestus is an incombustible substance; carbon dioxide is an incombustible gas.

Incombustible cloth , a tissue of amianthus or asbestus; also, a fabric imbued with an incombustible substance.

-- In`com*bus"ti*ble*ness , noun -- In`com*bus"ti*bly , adverb

Income noun
1. A coming in; entrance; admittance; ingress; infusion. [ Obsolete] Shak.

More abundant incomes of light and strength from God.
Bp. Rust.

At mine income I louted low.
Drant.

2. That which is caused to enter; inspiration; influence; hence, courage or zeal imparted. [ R.]

I would then make in and steep
My income in their blood.
Chapman.

3. That gain which proceeds from labor, business, property, or capital of any kind, as the produce of a farm, the rent of houses, the proceeds of professional business, the profits of commerce or of occupation, or the interest of money or stock in funds, etc.; revenue; receipts; salary; especially, the annual receipts of a private person, or a corporation, from property; as, a large income .

No fields afford
So large an income to the village lord.
Dryden.

4. (Physiol.) That which is taken into the body as food; the ingesta; -- sometimes restricted to the nutritive, or digestible, portion of the food. See Food . Opposed to output .

Income bond , a bond issued on the income of the corporation or company issuing it, and the interest of which is to be paid from the earnings of the company before any dividends are made to stockholders; -- issued chiefly or exclusively by railroad companies. -- Income tax , a tax upon a person's incomes, emoluments, profits, etc., or upon the excess beyond a certain amount.

Syn. -- Gain; profit; proceeds; salary; revenue; receipts; interest; emolument; produce.

Incomer noun
1. One who comes in.

Outgoers and incomers .
Lew Wallace.

2. One who succeeds another, as a tenant of land, houses, etc. [ Eng.]

Incoming adjective
1. Coming in; accruing.

A full incoming profit on the product of his labor.
Burke.

2. Coming in, succeeding, or following, as occupant or possessor; as, in incoming tenant.

Incoming noun
1. The act of coming in; arrival.

The incomings and outgoings of the trains.
Dickens.

2. Income; gain. [ R.]

Many incomings are subject to great fluctuations.
Tooke.

Incomity noun Want of comity; incivility; rudeness. [ R.]

Incommensurability noun [ Confer French incommensurabilité .] The quality or state of being incommensurable. Reid.

Incommensurable adjective [ Prefix in- not + commensurable : confer French incommensurable .] Not commensurable; having no common measure or standard of comparison; as, quantities are incommensurable when no third quantity can be found that is an aliquot part of both; the side and diagonal of a square are incommensurable with each other; the diameter and circumference of a circle are incommensurable .

They are quantities incommensurable .
Burke.

-- In`com*men"su*ra*ble*ness , noun -- In`com*men"su*ra*bly , adverb

Incommensurable noun One of two or more quantities which have no common measure.

Incommensurate adjective
1. Not commensurate; not admitting of a common measure; incommensurable.

2. Not of equal of sufficient measure or extent; not adequate; as, our means are incommensurate to our wants.

Syn. -- Inadequate; insufficient; disproportionate.

-- In`com*men"su*rate*ly , adverb -- In`com*men"su*rate*ness , noun

Incommiscible adjective [ Latin incommiscibilis ; prefix in- not + commiscibilis that can be mingled.] Not commiscible; not mixable.

Incommixture noun A state of being unmixed; separateness. Sir T. Browne.

Incommodate transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Incommodated ; present participle & verbal noun Incommodating .] [ Latin incommodare . See Incommode .] To incommode. [ Obsolete] Bp. Hall.

Incommodation noun The state of being incommoded; inconvenience. [ Obsolete]

Incommode transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Incommoded ; present participle & verbal noun Incommoding .] [ French incommoder , Latin incommodare inconvenient; prefix in- not + commodus convenient. See Commodious .] To give inconvenience or trouble to; to disturb or molest; to discommode; to worry; to put out; as, we are incommoded by want of room.

Syn. -- To annoy; disturb; trouble; molest; disaccomodate; inconvenience; disquiet; vex; plague.

Incommode noun An inconvenience. [ R.] Strype.

Incommodement noun The act of incommoded. [ Obsolete] Cheyne.

Incommodious adjective [ Prefix in- not + commodious : confer Late Latin incommodious , Latin incommodus , French incommode .] Tending to incommode; not commodious; not affording ease or advantage; unsuitable; giving trouble; inconvenient; annoying; as, an incommodious seat; an incommodious arrangement. -- In`com*mo"di*ous*ly , adverb -- In`com*mo"di*ous*ness , noun

Incommodity noun ; plural Incommodities . [ Latin incommoditas : confer French incommodité . See Incommodious .] Inconvenience; trouble; annoyance; disadvantage; encumbrance. [ Archaic] Bunyan.

A great incommodity to the body.
Jer. Taylor.

Buried him under a bulk of incommodities .
Hawthorne.

Incommunicability noun [ Confer French incommunicabilité .] The quality or state of being incommunicable, or incapable of being imparted.

Incommunicable adjective [ Latin incommunicabilis : confer French incommunicable . See In- not, and Communicable .] Not communicable; incapable of being communicated, shared, told, or imparted, to others.

Health and understanding are incommunicable .
Southey.

Those incommunicable relations of the divine love.
South.

-- In`com*mu"ni*ca*ble*ness , noun -- In`com*mu"ni*ca*bly , adverb

Incommunicated adjective Not communicated or imparted. [ Obsolete] Dr. H. More.

Incommunicating adjective Having no communion or intercourse with each other. [ Obsolete] Sir M. Hale.

Incommunicative adjective Not communicative; not free or apt to impart to others in conversation; reserved; silent; as, the messenger was incommunicative ; hence, not disposed to hold fellowship or intercourse with others; exclusive.

The Chinese . . . an incommunicative nation.
C. Buchanan.

-- In`com*mu"ni*ca*tive*ly , adverb -- In`com*mu"ni*ca*tive*ness , noun Lamb.

His usual incommunicativeness .
G. Eliot.

Incommutability noun [ Latin incommutabilitas : confer French incommutabilité .] The quality or state of being incommutable.

Incommutable adjective [ Latin incommutabilis : confer French incommutable . See In- not, and Commutable .] Not commutable; not capable of being exchanged with, or substituted for, another. Cudworth. -- In`com*mut"a*ble*ness , noun -- In`com*mut"a*bly , adverb

Incompact, Incompacted adjective Not compact; not having the parts firmly united; not solid; incoherent; loose; discrete. Boyle.

Incomparable adjective [ Latin incomparabilis : confer French incomparable . See In- not, and Comparable .] Not comparable; admitting of no comparison with others; unapproachably eminent; without a peer or equal; matchless; peerless; transcendent.

A merchant of incomparable wealth.
Shak.

A new hypothesis . . . which hath the incomparable Sir Isaac Newton for a patron.
Bp. Warburton.

-- In*com"pa*ra*ble*ness , noun -- In*com"pa*ra*bly , adverb

Delights incomparably all those corporeal things.
Bp. Wilkins.

Incompared adjective Peerless; incomparable. [ Obsolete] Spenser.

Incompass transitive verb See Encompass .

Incompassion noun [ Prefix in- not + compassion : confer French incompassion .] Want of compassion or pity. [ Obsolete] Bp. Sanderson.

Incompassionate adjective Not compassionate; void of pity or of tenderness; remorseless. -- In`com*pas"sion*ate*ly , adverb -- In`com*pas"sion*ate*ness , noun

Incompatibility noun ; plural -ties [ Confer French incompatibilité .] The quality or state of being incompatible; inconsistency; irreconcilableness.

Incompatible adjective [ Prefix in- not + compatible : confer French incompatible .] [ It was formerly sometimes written incompetible .]


1. Not compatible; so differing as to be incapable of harmonious combination or coexistence; inconsistent in thought or being; irreconcilably disagreeing; as, persons of incompatible tempers; incompatible colors, desires, ambition.

A strength and obduracy of character incompatible with his meek and innocent nature.
Southey.

2. (Chemistry) Incapable of being together without mutual reaction or decomposition, as certain medicines.

Incompatible terms (Logic) , terms which can not be combined in thought.

Syn. -- Inconsistent; incongruous; dissimilar; irreconcilable; unsuitable; disagreeing; inharmonious; discordant; repugnant; contradictory. See Inconsistent .

Incompatible noun (Med. & Chem.) An incompatible substance; esp., in plural , things which can not be placed or used together because of a change of chemical composition or of opposing medicinal qualities; as, the incompatibles of iron.

Incompatibleness noun The quality or state of being incompatible; incompatibility.

Incompatibly adverb In an incompatible manner; inconsistently; incongruously.

Incompetence, Incompetency noun [ Confer French incompétence .]


1. The quality or state of being incompetent; want of physical, intellectual, or moral ability; insufficiency; inadequacy; as, the incompetency of a child for hard labor, or of an idiot for intellectual efforts. "Some inherent incompetency ." Gladstone.

2. (Law) Want of competency or legal fitness; incapacity; disqualification, as of a person to be heard as a witness, or to act as a juror, or of a judge to try a cause.

Syn. -- Inability; insufficiency; inadequacy; disqualification; incapability; unfitness.