Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Bobolink noun (Zoology) An American singing bird ( Dolichonyx oryzivorus ). The male is black and white; the female is brown; -- called also, ricebird , reedbird , and Boblincoln .

The happiest bird of our spring is the bobolink .
W. Irving.

Bobsled, Bobsleigh noun A short sled, mostly used as one of a pair connected by a reach or coupling; also, the compound sled so formed. [ U. S.]

The long wagon body set on bobsleds .
W. D. Howells.

Bobstay noun [ Bob + stay .] (Nautical) A rope or chain to confine the bowsprit of a ship downward to the stem or cutwater; -- usually in the plural

Bobtail noun [ Bob + tail .] An animal (as a horse or dog) with a short tail.

Rag, tag, and bobtail , the rabble.

Bobtail adjective Bobtailed. " Bobtail cur." Marryat.

Bobtailed adjective Having the tail cut short, or naturally short; curtailed; as, a bobtailed horse or dog; a bobtailed coat.

Bobwhite noun (Zoology) The common quail of North America ( Colinus, or Ortyx, Virginianus ); -- so called from its note.

Bocal noun [ French] A cylindrical glass vessel, with a large and short neck.

Bocardo noun [ A mnemonic word.]
1. (Logic) A form of syllogism of which the first and third propositions are particular negatives, and the middle term a universal affirmative.

Baroko and Bocardo have been stumbling blocks to the logicians.
Bowen.

2. A prison; -- originally the name of the old north gate in Oxford, which was used as a prison. [ Eng.] Latimer.

Bocasine noun [ French bocassin , boucassin .] A sort of fine buckram.

Bocca noun [ Italian , mouth.] The round hole in the furnace of a glass manufactory through which the fused glass is taken out. Craig.

Boce (bōs) noun [ Latin box , bocis , Greek bo`ax , bw^x .] (Zoology) A European fish ( Box vulgaris ), having a compressed body and bright colors; -- called also box , and bogue .

Bock beer [ German bockbier ; bock a buck + bier beer; -- said to be so named from its tendency to cause the drinker to caper like a goat.] A strong beer, originally made in Bavaria. [ Also written buck beer .]

Bockelet noun (Zoology) A kind of long-winged hawk; -- called also bockerel , and bockeret . [ Obsolete]

Bockey noun [ Dutch bokaal .] A bowl or vessel made from a gourd. [ Local, New York] Bartlett.

Bocking noun A coarse woolen fabric, used for floor cloths, to cover carpets, etc.; -- so called from the town of Bocking , in England, where it was first made.

Bockland noun See Bookland .

Bod veal Veal too immature to be suitable for food.

Boddice noun See Bodick .

Bode transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Boded ; present participle & verbal noun Boding .] [ Middle English bodien , Anglo-Saxon bodian to announce, tell from bod command; akin to Icelandic bo...a to announce, Swedish båda to announce, portend. √89. See Bid .] To indicate by signs, as future events; to be the omen of; to portend to presage; to foreshow.

A raven that bodes nothing but mischief.
Goldsmith.

Good onset bodes good end.
Spenser.

Bode intransitive verb To foreshow something; to augur.

Whatever now
The omen proved, it boded well to you.
Dryden.

Syn. -- To forebode; foreshadow; augur; betoken.

Bode noun
1. An omen; a foreshadowing. [ Obsolete]

The owl eke, that of death the bode bringeth.
Chaucer.

2. A bid; an offer. [ Obsolete or Dial.] Sir W. Scott

Bode noun [ Anglo-Saxon boda ; akin to OFries. boda , Anglo-Saxon bodo , Old High German boto . See Bode , transitive verb ] A messenger; a herald. Robertson.

Bode noun [ See Abide .] A stop; a halting; delay. [ Obsolete]

Bode imperfect & past participle from Bide . Abode.

There that night they bode .
Tennyson.

Bode past participle of Bid . Bid or bidden. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.

Bodeful adjective Portentous; ominous. Carlyle.

Bodement noun An omen; a prognostic. [ Obsolete]

This foolish, dreaming, superstitious girl
Makes all these bodements .
Shak.

Bodge noun A botch; a patch. [ Dial.] Whitlock.

Bodge transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Bodged ] To botch; to mend clumsily; to patch. [ Obsolete or Dial.]

Bodge intransitive verb See Budge .

Bodhisat Bo`dhi*satt"va Bo`dhi*satt"wa noun [ Sanskrit bōdhisattva (perh. through Pali bōdhisattō ); from bōdhi knowledge, enlightenment + sattva being, essence.] (Buddhism) One who has reached the highest degree of saintship, so that in his next incarnation he will be a Buddha, or savior of the world. -- Bo"dhi*sat`ship , noun

Bodian noun (Zoology) A large food fish ( Diagramma lineatum ), native of the East Indies.

Bodice noun [ This is properly the plural of body , Oe. bodise a pair of bodies, equiv. to a bodice. Confer Corset , and see Body .]
1. A kind of under waist stiffened with whalebone, etc., worn esp. by women; a corset; stays.

2. A close-fitting outer waist or vest forming the upper part of a woman's dress, or a portion of it.

Her bodice half way she unlaced.
Prior.

Bodiced adjective Wearing a bodice. Thackeray.

Bodied adjective Having a body; -- usually in composition; as, able- bodied .

A doe . . . not altogether so fat, but very good flesh and good bodied .
Hakluyt.

Bodiless adjective
1. Having no body.

2. Without material form; incorporeal.

Phantoms bodiless and vain.
Swift.

Bodiliness noun Corporeality. Minsheu.

Bodily adjective
1. Having a body or material form; physical; corporeal; consisting of matter.

You are a mere spirit, and have no knowledge of the bodily part of us.
Tatler.

2. Of or pertaining to the body, in distinction from the mind. " Bodily defects." L'Estrange.

3. Real; actual; put in execution. [ Obsolete]

Be brought to bodily act.
Shak.

Bodily fear , apprehension of physical injury.

Syn. -- See Corporal .

Bodily adverb
1. Corporeally; in bodily form; united with a body or matter; in the body.

For in him dwelleth all the fullness of the Godhead bodily .
Col. ii. 9

2. In respect to, or so as to affect, the entire body or mass; entirely; all at once; completely; as, to carry away bodily . "Leapt bodily below." Lowell.

Boding (bōd"ĭng) adjective Foreshowing; presaging; ominous. -- Bod"ing*ly , adverb

Boding noun A prognostic; an omen; a foreboding.

Bodkin (bŏd"kĭn) noun [ Middle English boydekyn dagger; of uncertain origin; confer W. bidog hanger, short sword, Ir. bideog , Gael. biodag .]
1. A dagger. [ Obsolete]

When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin .
Shak.

2. (Needlework) An implement of steel, bone, ivory, etc., with a sharp point, for making holes by piercing; a ...tiletto; an eyeleteer.

3. (Print.) A sharp tool, like an awl, used for picking ...ut letters from a column or page in making corrections.

4. A kind of needle with a large eye and a blunt point, for drawing tape, ribbon, etc., through a loop or a hem; a tape needle.

Wedged whole ages in a bodkin's eye.
Pope.

5. A kind of pin used by women to fasten the hair.

To sit , ride , or travel bodkin , to sit closely wedged between two persons. [ Colloq.] Thackeray.

Bodkin noun See Baudekin . [ Obsolete] Shirley.

Bodle noun A small Scotch coin worth about one sixth of an English penny. Sir W. Scott.

Bodleian adjective Of or pertaining to Sir Thomas Bodley, or to the celebrated library at Oxford, founded by him in the sixteenth century.

Bodock noun [ Corrupt. from bois d'arc .] The Osage orange. [ Southwestern U.S.]

Bodrage noun [ Prob. of Celtic origin: confer Bordrage .] A raid. [ Obsolete]