Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Anchylose transitive verb & i. [ imperfect & past participle Anchylosed ; present participle & verbal noun Anchylosing .] [ Confer French ankyloser .] To affect or be affected with anchylosis; to unite or consolidate so as to make a stiff joint; to grow together into one. [ Spelt also ankylose .] Owen.

Anchylosis, Ankylosis noun [ New Latin , from Greek ..., from ..., from ... to crook, stiffen, from ... crooked: confer French ankylose .]
1. (Medicine) Stiffness or fixation of a joint; formation of a stiff joint. Dunglison.

2. (Anat.) The union of two or more separate bones to from a single bone; the close union of bones or other structures in various animals.

Anchylotic adjective Of or pertaining to anchylosis.

Ancient adjective [ Middle English auncien , French ancien , Late Latin antianus , from Latin ante before. See Ante- , pref .]
1. Old; that happened or existed in former times, usually at a great distance of time; belonging to times long past; specifically applied to the times before the fall of the Roman empire; -- opposed to modern ; as, ancient authors, literature, history; ancient days.

Witness those ancient empires of the earth.
Milton.

Gildas Albanius . . . much ancienter than his namesake surnamed the Wise.
Fuller.

2. Old; that has been of long duration; of long standing; of great age; as, an ancient forest; an ancient castle. "Our ancient bickerings." Shak.

Remove not the ancient landmarks, which thy fathers have set.
Prov. xxii. 28.

An ancient man, strangely habited, asked for quarters.
Scott.

3. Known for a long time, or from early times; -- opposed to recent or new ; as, the ancient continent.

A friend, perhaps, or an ancient acquaintance.
Barrow.

4. Dignified, like an aged man; magisterial; venerable. [ Archaic]

He wrought but some few hours of the day, and then would he seem very grave and ancient .
Holland.

5. Experienced; versed. [ Obsolete]

Though [ he] was the youngest brother, yet he was the most ancient in the business of the realm.
Berners.

6. Former; sometime. [ Obsolete]

They mourned their ancient leader lost.
Pope.

Ancient demesne (Eng. Law) , a tenure by which all manors belonging to the crown, in the reign of William the Conqueror, were held. The numbers, names, etc., of these were all entered in a book called Domesday Book . -- Ancient lights (Law) , windows and other openings which have been enjoined without molestation for more than twenty years. In England, and in some of the United States, they acquire a prescriptive right.

Syn. -- Old; primitive; pristine; antique; antiquated; old- fashioned; obsolete. -- Ancient , Antiquated , Obsolete , Antique , Antic , Old . -- Ancient is opposed to modern , and has antiquity; as, an ancient family, ancient landmarks, ancient institutions, systems of thought, etc. Antiquated describes that which has gone out of use or fashion; as, antiquated furniture, antiquated laws, rules, etc. Obsolete is commonly used, instead of antiquated , in reference to language, customs, etc.; as, an obsolete word or phrase, an obsolete expression. Antique is applied, in present usage, either to that which has come down from the ancients; as, an antique cameo, bust, etc. ; or to that which is made to imitate some ancient work of art; as, an antique temple. In the days of Shakespeare, antique was often used for ancient ; as, "an antique song," "an antique Roman;" and hence, from singularity often attached to what is ancient, it was used in the sense of grotesque; as, "an oak whose antique root peeps out; " and hence came our present word antic , denoting grotesque or ridiculous. We usually apply both ancient and old to things subject to gradual decay. We say, an old man, an ancient record; but never, the old stars, an old river or mountain. In general, however, ancient is opposed to modern , and old to new , fresh , or recent . When we speak of a thing that existed formerly, which has ceased to exist, we commonly use ancient ; as, ancient republics, ancient heroes; and not old republics, old heroes. But when the thing which began or existed in former times is still in existence, we use either ancient or old ; as, ancient statues or paintings, or old statues or paintings; ancient authors, or old authors, meaning books.

Ancient noun
1. plural Those who lived in former ages, as opposed to the moderns .

2. An aged man; a patriarch. Hence: A governor; a ruler; a person of influence.

The Lord will enter into judgment with the ancients of his people, and the princes thereof.
Isa. iii. 14.

3. A senior; an elder; a predecessor. [ Obsolete]

Junius and Andronicus . . . in Christianity . . . were his ancients .
Hooker.

4. plural (Eng. Law) One of the senior members of the Inns of Court or of Chancery.

Council of Ancients (French Hist.) , one of the two assemblies composing the legislative bodies in 1795. Brande.

Ancient noun [ Corrupted from ensign .]
1. An ensign or flag. [ Obsolete]

More dishonorable ragged than an old-faced ancient .
Shak.

2. The bearer of a flag; an ensign. [ Obsolete]

This is Othello's ancient , as I take it.
Shak.

Anciently adverb
1. In ancient times.

2. In an ancient manner. [ R.]

Ancientness noun The quality of being ancient; antiquity; existence from old times.

Ancientry noun
1. Antiquity; what is ancient.

They contain not word of ancientry .
West.

2. Old age; also, old people. [ R.]

Wronging the ancientry .
Shak.

3. Ancient lineage; ancestry; dignity of birth.

A gentleman of more ancientry than estate.
Fuller.

Ancienty noun [ French ancienneté , from ancien . See Ancient .]
1. Age; antiquity. [ Obsolete] Martin.

2. Seniority. [ Obsolete]

Ancile noun [ Latin ] (Rom. Antiq.) The sacred shield of the Romans, said to have-fallen from heaven in the reign of Numa. It was the palladium of Rome.

Ancillary adjective [ Latin ancillaris , from ancilla a female servant.] Subservient or subordinate, like a handmaid; auxiliary.

The Convocation of York seems to have been always considered as inferior, and even ancillary , to the greater province.
Hallam.

Ancillary administration (Law) An administration subordinate to, and in aid of, the primary or principal administration of an estate.

Ancille noun [ Old French ancelle , Latin ancilla .] A maidservant; a handmaid. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.

Ancipital, Ancipitous adjective [ Latin anceps , ancipitis , two-headed, double; an- for amb- on both sides + caput head.] (Botany) Two-edged instead of round; -- said of certain flattened stems, as those of blue grass, and rarely also of leaves.

Ancistroid adjective [ Greek ...; ... a hook + ... shape.] Hook-shaped.

Ancle noun See Ankle .

Ancome (ăn"kŭm) noun [ Anglo-Saxon ancuman , oncuman , to come.] A small ulcerous swelling, coming suddenly; also, a whitlow. [ Obsolete] Boucher.

Ancon (ăn"kŏm) noun ; Latin plural Ancones [ Latin , from Greek 'agkw`n the bent arm, elbow; any hook or bend.] (Anat.) The olecranon, or the elbow.

Ancon sheep (Zoology) , a breed of sheep with short crooked legs and long back. It originated in Massachusetts in 1791; -- called also the otter breed .

Ancon, Ancone noun [ See Ancon , above.] (Architecture) (a) The corner or quoin of a wall, cross-beam, or rafter. [ Obsolete] Gwilt. (b) A bracket supporting a cornice; a console.

Anconal, Anconeal adjective (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the ancon or elbow. "The olecranon on anconeal process." Flower.

Anconeus noun [ New Latin , from Latin ancon elbow.] (Anat.) A muscle of the elbow and forearm.

Anconoid adjective Elbowlike; anconal.

Ancony noun [ Origin unknown.] (Iron Work) A piece of malleable iron, wrought into the shape of a bar in the middle, but unwrought at the ends.

And conj. [ Anglo-Saxon and ; akin to Old Saxon endi , Icelandic enda , Old High German anti , enti , inti , unti , German und , Dutch en , OD. ende . Cf, An if, Ante- .]
1. A particle which expresses the relation of connection or addition. It is used to conjoin a word with a word, a clause with a clause, or a sentence with a sentence.

(a) It is sometimes used emphatically; as, "there are women and women," that is, two very different sorts of women.

(b) By a rhetorical figure, notions, one of which is modificatory of the other, are connected by and ; as, "the tediousness and process of my travel," that is, the tedious process, etc.; "thy fair and outward character," that is, thy outwardly fair character, Schmidt's Shak. Lex.

2. In order to; -- used instead of the infinitival to , especially after try , come , go .

At least to try and teach the erring soul.
Milton.

3. It is sometimes, in old songs, a mere expletive.

When that I was and a little tiny boy.
Shak.

4. If; though. See An , conj. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.

As they will set an house on fire, and it were but to roast their eggs.
Bacon.

And so forth , and others; and the rest; and similar things; and other things or ingredients. The abbreviation, etc. ( et cetera ), or &c. , is usually read and so forth .

Andabatism noun [ Latin andabata a kind of Roman gladiator, who fought hoodwinked.] Doubt; uncertainty. [ Obsolete] Shelford.

Andalusite noun (Min.) A silicate of aluminium, occurring usually in thick rhombic prisms, nearly square, of a grayish or pale reddish tint. It was first discovered in Andalusia, Spain.

Andante adjective [ Italian andante , present participle of andare to go.] (Mus.) Moving moderately slow, but distinct and flowing; quicker than larghetto, and slower than allegretto. -- noun A movement or piece in andante time.

Andantino adjective [ Italian , dim. of andante .] (Mus.) Rather quicker than andante; between that allegretto.

» Some, taking andante in its original sense of "going," and andantino as its diminutive, or "less going," define the latter as slower than andante .

Andarac noun [ A corruption of sandarac .] Red orpiment. Coxe.

Andean adjective Pertaining to the Andes.

Andesine noun (Min.) A kind of triclinic feldspar found in the Andes .

Andesite noun (Min.) An eruptive rock allied to trachyte, consisting essentially of a triclinic feldspar, with pyroxene, hornblende, or hypersthene.

Andine adjective Andean; as, Andine flora.

Andiron noun [ Middle English anderne , aunderne , aundyre , Old French andier , French landier , from Late Latin andena , andela , anderia , of unknown origin. The Eng. was probably confused with brand-iron , Anglo-Saxon brand- īsen .] A utensil for supporting wood when burning in a fireplace, one being placed on each side; a firedog; as, a pair of andirons .

Andrœcium noun [ New Latin , from Greek 'anh`r , 'andro`s , man + ... house.] (bot.) The stamens of a flower taken collectively.

Andranatomy noun [ Greek 'anh`r , 'andro`s , man + ...: confer French andranatomie . See Anatomy , Androtomy .] The dissection of a human body, especially of a male; androtomy. Coxe.

Androcephalous adjective [ Greek ..., ..., man + ... head.] Having a human head (upon an animal's body), as the Egyptian sphinx.

Androdiœcious, -diecious adjective [ Greek ..., ..., man + English diœcious .] (Botany) Having perfect and staminate flowers on different plants. -- An`dro*di*œ"cism , -di*e"cism noun

Androgyne noun
1. An hermaphrodite.

2. (Botany) An androgynous plant. Whewell.

Androgynous, Androgynal adjective [ Latin androgynus , Greek ...; 'anh`r , 'andro`s , man + gynh` woman: confer French androgyne .]
1. Uniting both sexes in one, or having the characteristics of both; being in nature both male and female; hermaphroditic. Owen.

The truth is, a great mind must be androgynous .
Coleridge.

2. (Botany) Bearing both staminiferous and pistilliferous flowers in the same cluster.

Androgyny, Androgynism noun Union of both sexes in one individual; hermaphroditism.

Android (ăn"droid), An*droi"des (ăn*droi"dēz) noun [ Greek 'androeidh`s of man's form; 'anh`r , 'andro`s , man + e'i^dos form.] A machine or automaton in the form of a human being.

Android adjective Resembling a man.

Andromeda noun [ Latin , from Greek ..., the daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia. When bound to a rock and exposed to a sea monster, she was delivered by Perseus.]
1. (Astron.) A northern constellation, supposed to represent the mythical Andromeda.

2. (bot.) A genus of ericaceous flowering plants of northern climates, of which the original species was found growing on a rock surrounded by water.

Andromede, Andromed noun (Astron.) A meteor appearing to radiate from a point in the constellation Andromeda, -- whence the name.

» A shower of these meteors takes place every year on November 27th or 28th. The Andromedes are also called Bielids , as they are connected with Biela's comet and move in its orbit.

Andron noun [ Latin andron , Greek ..., from 'anh`r , 'andro`s , man.] (Gr. & Rom. Arch.) The apartment appropriated for the males. This was in the lower part of the house.

Andropetalous adjective [ Greek 'anh`r , 'andro`s , man + ... leaf.] (Botany) Produced by the conversion of the stamens into petals, as double flowers, like the garden ranunculus. Brande.

Androphagi noun plural [ New Latin , from Greek ...; 'anh`r , 'andro`s , man + ... to eat.] Cannibals; man-eaters; anthropophagi. [ R.]