efflorescence

  1. the period of greatest prosperity or productivity
  2. any red eruption of the skin
  3. the time and process of budding and unfolding of blossoms
  4. a powdery deposit on a surface

Found on

Efflorescence

A white powder on the surface of walls due to evaporation of water. It forms on the surface of bricks.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Efflorescence

In chemistry, efflorescence (which means `to flower out` in French) is the loss of water (or a solvent) of crystallization from a hydrated or solvated salt to the atmosphere on exposure to air. Efflorescences can occur in natural and built environments. On porous construction materials it may present a cosmetic problem only (primary efflorescenc.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Efflorescence

efflorescence

The phenomenon of certain minerals that when exposed to air, lose water from their chemical structure, and develop a white powder on the crystal faces.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

Efflorescence

• (n.) A redness of the skin; eruption, as in rash, measles, smallpox, scarlatina, etc. • (n.) The powder or crust thus formed. • (n.) Flowering, or state of flowering; the blooming of flowers; blowth. • (n.) The formation of the whitish powder or crust on the surface of efflorescing bodies, as salts, etc.Efflorescence: words in...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/efflorescence/

efflorescence

(ef″lo-res´әns) the quality of being efflorescent. development of a rash or eruption.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Efflorescence

(F efflorescence). White salts brought to the surface of porous building materials by water movement (BS 4049)
Found on http://www.angelfire.com/biz/BuildingPathology/BldngPathGlsry.html

efflorescence

1. <botany> Flowering, or state of flowering; the blooming of flowers; blowth. ... 2. <medicine> A redness of the skin; eruption, as in rash, measles, smallpox, scarlatina, etc. ... 3. <chemistry> The formation of the whitish powder or crust on the surface of efflorescing bodies, as salts, etc. The powder or crust thus formed. ......
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

efflorescence

bloom noun a powdery deposit on a surface
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Efflorescence

Ef`flo·res'cence noun [ French efflorescence .] 1. (Botany) Flowering, or state of flowering; the blooming of flowers; blowth. 2. (Medicine) A redness of the skin; eruption, as in rash, measles, smallpox, scarlatina, etc. 3. (Chemistry) (a) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/11

Efflorescence

A crystalline deposit appearing on stone surfaces typically caused by soluble salts carried through or onto the stone by moisture, which has sometimes been found to come from brick, tile, concrete blocks, cement, mortar, concrete, and similar materials in the wall or above.
Found on http://www.contractorschoolonline.com/Masonry-Glossary.aspx

Efflorescence

A crystalline deposit of salts which leach from the concrete as soluble calcium hydroxides and within a short period of time will combine with the atmospheric carbon dioxide to form insoluble calcium carbonates, usually white in color, appearing on the surfaces of masonry, stucco or concrete.
Found on http://www.moxie-intl.com/glossary.htm

efflorescence

A deposit of salts that remain on the surface of masonry, brick or plaster when water has evaporated.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21303

efflorescence

A deposit of salts that remain on the surface of masonry, brick or plaster when water has evaporated.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21452

Efflorescence

A deposit of salts that remain on the surface of masonry, brick or plaster when water has evaporated
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22428

Efflorescence

A deposit of white powder on the surface of masonry which comes from the leaching of water soluble salts in the masonry by evaporation of water
Found on http://www.masoncontractors.org/aboutmasonry/masonryglossary/

Efflorescence

A deposit or encrustation of soluble salts generally white, usually carbonates or sulfates, that may form on the surface of stone, brick, concrete or mortar when moisture moves through and evaporates from the masonry.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

efflorescence

A powder or stain sometimes found on the surface of masonry, resulting from deposition of water-soluble salts.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22187

Efflorescence

A white powdery deposit of soluble salts of calcium, potassium, and sodium which forms on the surfaces of masonry. Efflorescence is caused by the release of excess water of crystallization
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22192

Efflorescence

an unsightly white powdery deposit on the surface of stone, brick or cement work, caused by soluble salts being drawn to the surface where they then crystallise. Efflorescence is usually harmless and can be brushed off when dry.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Efflorescence

Deposit of calcium carbonate (or other salts), usually white in color, appearing upon the surface or found within the near-surface pores of concrete. The salts deposit on concrete upon evaporation of water that carries the dissolved salts through the concrete toward exposed surfaces.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21122

efflorescence

efflorescence: see hydrate.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0912883.html

Efflorescence

In chemistry, efflorescence is the spontaneous loss of water by a substance when exposed to air.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GE.HTM

Efflorescence

In mineralology, efflorescence is the property which certain crystals possess of losing their clear transparent character and producing a light powder on the surface, eg washing-soda. Efflorescence is also the name given to the fine crystalline deposits (magnesium and sodium sulphates) which appear on walls, etc.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/HE.HTM

Efflorescence

See, 'Calcium Carbonate.'
Found on http://www.soundhome.com/glossary
No exact match found