torque

A neck ornament, which was a symbol of power to the Celts. Silver. The idea was adopted by the Romans, who awarded a silver or gold torque as a military decoration. The soldiers who got them were known as torquati or torquati duplares when they got the award twice. The decoration was associated with an increase in pay or double increase for the dup…...

torque

the turning force that is applied to a shaft or other rotary mechanism to cause it to rotate or tend to do so. Torque is measured in units of length and force (footpounds, newton-meters).

Torque

A twined metal loop worn around the neck by Celts.

torque

twisting force causing rotation 
Found on http://www.graduateshotline.com/list.html

Torque

The torque or turning moment acting on a body is defined as the product ofthe magnitude of the force and the perpendicular distance of the line of action ofthe force from the axis about which the body is being rotated.T = FdwhereT = torque NmF = magnitude of the force Nd = perpendicular distance from the line of action of the force to the axis of r...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/t/o/torque/source.html

torque

Prehistoric neck-ring ornament usually made of gold. They are found during the Bronze and Iron Age periods in Britain, Ireland, and northwestern Europe, particularly in Celtic cultures, where they...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Torque

Moment causing twisting of the cross section.
Found on http://www.corusconstruction.com/en/design_guidance/the_blue_book/

Torque

The moment of the aerodynamic forces about the thrust line of a propeller which tends to turn the aeroplane in the opposite direction to that in which the propeller is rotating.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

torque

The tendency of a body to rotate under an applied force
Found on http://www.fisicx.com/quickreference/science/glossary.html

Torque

Torque noun [ Latin torques a twisted neck chain, from torquere to twist.] 1. A collar or neck chain, usually twisted, especially as worn by ancient barbaric nations, as the Gauls, Germans, and Britons. 2. [ Latin torquere to twist.] (Mech.) That which tends...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/73

torque

(tork) a rotatory force causing part of a structure to twist about an axis.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Torque

• (n.) A turning or twisting; tendency to turn, or cause to turn, about an axis. • (n.) That which tends to produce torsion; a couple of forces. • (n.) A collar or neck chain, usually twisted, especially as worn by ancient barbaric nations, as the Gauls, Germans, and Britons.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/torque/

torque

in jewelry, metal collar, neck ring, or armband consisting of a bar or ribbon of twisted metal curved into a loop, the ends of which are fashioned ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/63

torque

in physics, the tendency of a force to rotate the body to which it is applied. The torque, specified with regard to the axis of rotation, is equal to ... [16 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/63

torque

A force that produces rotation. Torque is measured in pound-feet in the English system and Newton-meters in the metric system.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21004

Torque

The pulling effort developed by the motor
Found on http://www.thyssenkruppelevator.com/glossary.html

Torque

force that tends to rotate a body.
Found on http://www.empiremagnetics.com/glossary/glossary.htm#A

torque

sum of the moments of a set of forces having zero resultant NOTE - The French term 'moment de couple' is in accordance with the note of the term 'couple'. The term 'torque' has been introduced into French in the second edition (1992) of international standard ISO 31-3.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=111-13-27

torque

A measure of the effectiveness of a force or moment in setting a body in rotation. In mechanics, a torque is a twisting moment or couple which tends to twist a fixed object such as a shaft about a rotation axis. If the shaft starts to rotate, the power it transmits is give by the product of the rota...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/T/torque.html

torque

(motor) The turning or twisting force generated by an electrical motor in order for it to operate. Related category • ENGINES AND MOTORS
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/T/AE_torque.html

Torque

The turning effort or force applied to a shaft, usually expressed in inch-pounds or inch-ounces for fractional and sub-fractional HP motors.
Found on http://www.electricmotorwarehouse.com/Glossary.htm

torque

torque, in physics, that which tends to change the rate of rotation of a body; also called the moment of force. The torque produced by rotating parts of an electric motor or internal-combustion engine is often used as a measure of its ability to do useful work. The magnitude of the torque acting on ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0849088.html

Torque

A torque was a necklace or collar of twisted metal worn by ancient Britons and Gauls.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/PT.HTM

torque

(T) Type: Term Pronunciation: tōrk Definitions: 1. A rotatory force. 2. In dentistry, a torsion force applied to a tooth to produce or maintain crown or root movement.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=92641

torque

(physics) Turning effect of force on an object. A turbine produces a torque that turns an electricity generator in a power station. Torque is measured by multiplying the force by its perpendicular distance from the turning point
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0025362.html
No exact match found