Webster's Dictionary, 1913

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Intertalk intransitive verb To converse. [ Obsolete] Carew.

Intertangle transitive verb To entangle; to intertwine. "Moss and intertangled vines." Longfellow.

Intertarsal adjective (Anat.) Between the tarsal bones; as, the intertarsal articulations.

Intertex transitive verb [ Latin intertexere ; inter between + texere to weave.] To intertwine; to weave or bind together. [ Obsolete] B. Jonson.

Intertexture noun The act of interweaving, or the state of being interwoven; that which is interwoven. "Knit in nice intertexture ." Coleridge.

Skirted thick with intertexture firm
Of thorny boughs.
Cowper.

Interthoracic adjective In the thorax.

Intertie noun (Architecture) In any framed work, a horizontal tie other than sill and plate or other principal ties, securing uprights to one another.

Intertissued adjective Interwoven. [ R.] Shak.

Intertraffic noun Mutual trade of traffic.

Intertranspicuous adjective Transpicuous within or between. [ R.] Shelley.

Intertransverse adjective Between the transverse processes of the vertebræ.

Intertrigo noun [ Latin , from inter between + terere , tritum , to rub.] (Medicine) A rubbing or chafing of the skin; especially, an abrasion or excoriation of the skin between folds, as in fat or neglected children.

Intertrochanteric adjective (Anat.) Between the trochanters of the femur.

Intertropical adjective Situated between or within the tropics. J. Morse.

Intertubular adjective Between tubes or tubules; as, intertubular cells; intertubular substance.

Intertwine transitive verb To unite by twining one with another; to entangle; to interlace. Milton.

Intertwine intransitive verb To be twined or twisted together; to become mutually involved or enfolded.

Intertwine noun The act of intertwining, or the state of being intertwined. Coleridge.

Intertwiningly adverb By intertwining or being intertwined.

Intertwist transitive verb To twist together one with another; to intertwine.

Intertwistingly adverb By intertwisting, or being intertwisted.

Interungular, Interungulate adjective (Anat.) Between ungulæ; as, interungular glands.

Interurban (ĭn`tẽr*ûr"b a n) adjective Going between, or connecting, cities or towns; as, interurban electric railways.

Interval noun [ Latin intervallum ; inter between + vallum a wall: confer French intervalle . See Wall .]


1. A space between things; a void space intervening between any two objects; as, an interval between two houses or hills.

'Twixt host and host but narrow space was left,
A dreadful interval .
Milton.

2. Space of time between any two points or events; as, the interval between the death of Charles I. of England, and the accession of Charles II.

3. A brief space of time between the recurrence of similar conditions or states; as, the interval between paroxysms of pain; intervals of sanity or delirium.

4. (Mus.) Difference in pitch between any two tones.

At intervals , coming or happening with intervals between; now and then. "And Miriam watch'd and dozed at intervals ." Tennyson. -- Augmented interval (Mus.) , an interval increased by half a step or half a tone.

Interval, Intervale noun A tract of low ground between hills, or along the banks of a stream, usually alluvial land, enriched by the overflowings of the river, or by fertilizing deposits of earth from the adjacent hills. Confer Bottom , noun , 7. [ Local, U. S.]

The woody intervale just beyond the marshy land.
The Century.

Intervallum noun ; plural Intervallums , Latin Intervalla . [ Latin ] An interval. [ R.]

And a' shall laugh without intervallums .
Shak.

In one of these intervalla .
Chillingworth.

Intervary intransitive verb To alter or vary between; to change. [ Obsolete] Rush.

Interveined adjective Intersected, as with veins.

Intervene intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Intervened ; present participle & verbal noun Intervening .] [ Latin intervenire , interventum , to intervene, to hinder; inter between + venire to come; akin to English come : confer French intervenir . See Come .]


1. To come between, or to be between, persons or things; -- followed by between ; as, the Mediterranean intervenes between Europe and Africa.

2. To occur, fall, or come between, points of time, or events; as, an instant intervened between the flash and the report; nothing intervened ( i. e. , between the intention and the execution) to prevent the undertaking.

3. To interpose; as, to intervene to settle a quarrel.

4. In a suit to which one has not been made a party, to put forward a defense of one's interest in the subject matter. Abbott.

Intervene transitive verb To come between. [ R.]

Self-sown woodlands of birch, alder, etc., intervening the different estates.
De Quincey.

Intervene noun A coming between; intervention; meeting. [ Obsolete] Sir H. Wotton.

Intervener noun One who intervenes; especially (Law) , a person who assumes a part in a suit between others.

Intervenience, Interveniency noun Intervention; interposition. [ R.]

Intervenient adjective [ Latin interveniens , present participle of intervenire .] Being or coming between; intercedent; interposed. [ Obsolete] Bacon.

Intervent transitive verb [ See Intervene .] To thwart; to obstruct. [ Obsolete] Chapman.

Intervention noun [ Latin interventio an interposition: confer French intervention .]


1. The act of intervening; interposition.

Sound is shut out by the intervention of that lax membrane.
Holder.

2. Any interference that may affect the interests of others; especially, of one or more states with the affairs of another; mediation.

Let us decide our quarrels at home, without the intervention , of any foreign power.
Sir W. Temple.

3. (Civil Law) The act by which a third person, to protect his own interest, interposes and becomes a party to a suit pending between other parties.

Interventor noun [ Latin : confer French interventeur .] One who intervenes; a mediator; especially (Eccles. Hist.) , a person designated by a church to reconcile parties, and unite them in the choice of officers. Coleman.

Interventricular adjective (Anat.) Between the ventricles; as, the interventricular partition of the heart.

Intervenue noun [ See Intervene , Avenue .] Interposition. [ Obsolete] Sir H. Blount.

Intervert transitive verb [ Latin intervertere ; inter between + vertere to turn.] To turn to another course or use. [ Obsolete] Sir H. Wotton.

Intervertebral adjective (Anat.) Between vertebræ. -- In`ter*ver"te*bral*ly , adverb

Interview noun [ French entrevue , from entrevoir to see imperfectly, to have a glimpse of, s'entrevoir to visit each other. See Inter- , and View .]


1. A mutual sight or view; a meeting face to face; usually, a formal or official meeting for consultation; a conference; as, the secretary had an interview with the President.

2. A conversation, or questioning, for the purpose of eliciting information for publication; the published statement so elicited.

» A recent use, originating in American newspapers, but apparently becoming general.

Interview transitive verb To have an interview with; to question or converse with, especially for the purpose of obtaining information for publication. [ Recent]

Interviewer noun One who interviews; especially, one who obtains an interview with another for the purpose of eliciting his opinions or obtaining information for publication.

It would have made him the prince of interviewers in these days.
Leslie Stephen.

Interviewing noun The act or custom of holding an interview or interviews.

An article on interviewing in the "Nation" of January 28, 1869, . . . was the first formal notice of the practice under that name.
The American.

Intervisible adjective (Surv.) Mutually visible, or in sight, the one from the other, as stations.

Intervisit intransitive verb To exchange visits. [ R.] Evelyn.

Intervital adjective Between two lives. [ R.]

Through all its [ the spirit's] intervital gloom.
Tennyson.

Intervocalic adjective (Phon.) Situated between vowels; immediately preceded and followed by vowel sounds, as, p in occupy , d in idea , etc.

Intervolution noun The state of being intervolved or coiled up; a convolution; as, the intervolutions of a snake. Hawthorne.