Curing

In concrete application, the process in which mortar and concrete harden. The length of time is dependent upon the type of cement, mix proportion, required strength, size and shape of the concrete section, weather and future exposure conditions. The period may be 3 weeks or longer for lean concrete mixtures used in structures such as dams or it ma...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Curing

• (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Cure • p. a. & vb. n. of Cure.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/curing/

Curing

(1) The maintenance of proper conditions of moisture and temperature during initial set to develop a required strength and reduce shrinkage in products containing Portland cement. (2) The initial time period during which cementitious materials gain strength.
Found on http://www.contractorschoolonline.com/Masonry-Glossary.aspx

curing

(from the article `adhesive`) ...molecules, or macromolecules, formed by the linking of thousands of simpler molecules known as monomers. The formation of the polymer (a chemical ... Epoxy resins, widely used as coatings and adhesives, are prepared by converting liquid polyethers into infusible solids by connecting the long-chain ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/170

curing

(from the article `clothing and footwear industry`) Curing consists of baking a garment or garment section in a heated chamber to either set creases in the fabric permanently or to decompose auxiliary ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/170

curing

(from the article `tobacco`) The three common methods of curing are by air, fire, and flue. A fourth method, sun curing, is practiced with aromatic types and to a limited extent ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/170

curing

1.Removing all traces of a disease from the body so that the body is perfectly healthy again. ... 2. A process of improving the flavour, colour, tenderness, and shelf life of a meat, such as by using smoke, spices, and chemicals. ... 3. Making a finished product out of a raw material by using heat or chemicals, such as tanned leather or vulcanised ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Curing

[chemistry] Curing is a term in polymer chemistry and process engineering that refers to the toughening or hardening of a polymer material by cross-linking of polymer chains, brought about by electron beams, heat or chemical additives. When the additives are activated by ultraviolet radiation the process is called UV Cure. In rubber, the cu...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curing_(chemistry)

Curing

[food preservation] == History == Food curing dates back to ancient times, both in the form of smoked meat and as salt-cured meat. The Plains Indians hung their meat at the top of their tipis to increase the amount of smoke coming into contact with the food. It was discovered in the 1800s that salt mixed with nitrates (saltpeter) would colo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curing_(food_preservation)

Curing

Cur'ing (k?r'?ng), p. adjective & verbal noun of Cure . Curing house , a building in which anything is cured; especially, in the West Indies, a building in which sugar is drained and dried.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/204

Curing

Allowing a paint to fully dry. Curing is the chemical reaction with atmospheric oxygen that dries solvent-based paints. It is also responsible for skins appearing in paint cans, caused by the can not being fully airtight when closed.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20471

Curing

Allowing the buds to mature, much like you would a fine wine. This aging process often makes the bud smoke smoother and taste different to when it was fresh, most will say it makes it better. *Also see Water Curing*
Found on http://www.rollitup.org/general-marijuana-growing/98008-glossary-terms.html

Curing

Also known as maturing or ageing - the stage in the cheesemaking process when a cheese is left to ripen.
Found on http://www.e-cookbooks.net/cheese.htm

curing

curing: see fish curing.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0912319.html

curing

Final conversion or drying or a coating material.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21303

curing

Final conversion or drying or a coating material.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21452

Curing

Final conversion or drying or a coating material.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22428

Curing

Holding potato tubers or sweet potato roots under warm, humid conditions that favor wound healing.
Found on https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/resource-library/vegetable-gardening-glossar

curing

In concrete application, the process in which mortar and concrete harden. The length of time is dependent upon the type of cement, mix proportion, required strength, size and shape of the concrete section, weather and future exposure conditions. The period may be 3 weeks or longer for lean concrete mixtures used in structures such as dams or it may...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21074

curing

Method of preserving meat by soaking it in salt (sodium chloride) solution, with saltpetre (sodium nitrate) added to give the meat its pink colour and characteristic taste. The nitrates in cured meats are converted to nitrites and nitrosamines by bacteria, and these are potentially carcinogenic to humans
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0039124.html

Curing

Preparing paper for the printing process by bringing it to the same temperature and humidity levels of the pressroom.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Curing

Process that uses salt to preserve pelt by creating an environment in which protein-destroying organisms cannot function.
Found on http://www.sheepusa.org/

Curing

See: Hardening.
Found on http://reprap.org/wiki/Glossary

Curing

The drying and hardening process of mortar after installation. Some materials require damp curing.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

Curing

The forming of a polymer by polymerization and/or Cross Linking.
Found on https://www.dwplastics.co.uk/glossary/
No exact match found