charcoal

charred wood used as fuel, made in woodland by burning rough wood cut into lengths of two to three feet, stacked for drying for several months, then piled into a pit of about 15 feet in diameter for burning, which took about 24 hours for dry, but much longer for green wood (Je, 37-38); black porous residue of partly burnt wood, bones, etc. (OED);...
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

Charcoal

A resource that can be crafted by placing a log (wood) in the smelting slot on a furnace. It can be used just like Coal to craft torches and as a fuel in a furnace.
Found on http://www.minecraftforum.net/topic/175251-minetionary-the-minecraft-dictio

Charcoal

Charcoal is a light black residue consisting of carbon, and any remaining ash, obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. Charcoal is usually produced by slow pyrolysis, the heating of wood or other substances in the absence of oxygen (see char and biochar). It is usually an impure form of car...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charcoal

Charcoal

• (v. t.) Impure carbon prepared from vegetable or animal substances; esp., coal made by charring wood in a kiln, retort, etc., from which air is excluded. It is used for fuel and in various mechanical, artistic, and chemical processes. • (v. t.) Finely prepared charcoal in small sticks, used as a drawing implement.Charcoal: words in the ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/charcoal/

charcoal

<chemical> An amorphous form of carbon prepared from the incomplete combustion of animal or vegetable matter, e.g., wood. The activated form of charcoal is used in the treatment of poisoning. ... Pharmacological action: antidotes. ... Chemical name: Charcoal ... (12 Dec 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

charcoal

(chahr´kōl) carbon prepared by charring wood or other organic material. activated charcoal the residue of destructive distillation of various organic materials, treated to increase its adsorptive power; used as a general purpose antidote.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

charcoal

charcoal-grey adjective of a very dark grey
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

charcoal

(art) In art, soft, brittle material in stick or pencil form used for sketching and more free and expressive drawing, Charcoal is rich and crumbly, and smudges easily. Lines can be blended easily using fingers or a putty rubber to give great depth and body to a form. Effects vary according to ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0097213.html

Charcoal

[art] Artists` charcoal is a form of dry art medium made of finely grounded organic materials that are held together by a gum or wax binder; which can also be produced without the use of binders by eliminating the oxygen inside the material during the production process. These charcoals are often used by artists for their versatile properti...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charcoal_(art)

Charcoal

[typeface] Charcoal is a sans-serif typeface designed by David Berlow of Font Bureau during the period 1994–1997. Charcoal was the default menu font in Apple Computer`s Mac OS 8 and 9, replacing Chicago as part of the new Platinum interface. In Mac OS X, it was replaced with Lucida Grande as the system typeface. Charcoal is designed for h...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charcoal_(typeface)

Charcoal

Char'coal` noun [ See Char , transitive verb , to burn or to reduce to coal, and Coal .] 1. Impure carbon prepared from vegetable or animal substances; esp., coal made by charring wood in a kiln, retort, etc., from which air is excluded. It is used for fuel ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/55

charcoal

A material formed from the incomplete combustion or destructive distillation (carbonization) of organic material in a kiln or retort, and having a high energy density, being nearly pure carbon. (If produced from coal, it is coke.) Charcoal is used for cooking, the manufacture of gunpowder and steel ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/AE_charcoal.html

Charcoal

A material formed from the incomplete combustion or destructive distillation (carbonization) of organic material in a kiln or retort, and having a high energy density, being nearly pure carbon. (If produced from coal, it is coke.) Used for cooking, the manufacture of gunpowder and steel (notably in Brazil), as an absorbent and decolorizing agent, a...
Found on https://energy.gov/eere/energybasics/articles/glossary-energy-related-terms

charcoal

Black, porous form of carbon, produced by heating wood or other organic materials in the absence of air. It is used as a fuel in the smelting of metals such as copper and zinc, and by artists for making black line drawings. Activated charcoal has been powdered and dried so that it presents a much inc...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0024193.html

Charcoal

Black, porous, carbonaceous material produced by the destructive distillation of wood and used as a fuel, filter, and absorbent. Charcoal is almost pure carbon, with about twice the energy content per unit mass as the original wood; therefore, it can burn at a much higher temperature than wood.
Found on https://teeic.indianaffairs.gov/glossary/glossary.htm

Charcoal

Charcoal is a term applied to an impure variety of carbon, especially such as is produced by charring wood. One kind of charcoal is also obtained from bones. Lampblack and coke are also varieties.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GC.HTM

Charcoal

Charcoal is one of the products derived from coppice woodland. It is formed when the wood is heated under conditions where there is insufficient oxygen for complete combustion to take place. The decline in the market for charcoal is one of the principle reasons for the decline in coppice management. Nowadays, charcoal is mostly used as barbecue fue...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21605

charcoal

charcoal, substance obtained by partial burning or carbonization (destructive distillation) of organic material. It is largely pure carbon. The entry of air during the carbonization process is controlled so that the organic material does not turn to ash, as in a conventional fire, but decomposes to ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0811399.html

charcoal

charred wood used as fuel, made in woodland by burning rough wood cut into lengths of two to three feet, stacked for drying for several months, then piled into a pit of about 15 feet in diameter for burning, which took about 24 hours for dry, but much longer for green wood (Je, 37-38); black porous residue of partly burnt wood, bones, etc. (OED); s...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

Charcoal

Compressed burned wood used for drawing
Found on http://www.latinart.com/glossary.cfm?sort=C

charcoal

impure form of graphitic carbon (q.v.), obtained as a residue when carbonaceous material is partially burned, or heated with limited access of air. ... [7 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/56

charcoal

In art, soft, brittle material in stick or pencil form used for sketching and more free and expressive drawing, Charcoal is rich and crumbly, and smudges easily. Lines can be blended easily using...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Charcoal

It is a black solid which contains carbon, it is made by heating wood in a closed space with no air.
Found on http://www.vidyagyaan.com/general-knowledge/basic-chemistry-element-terms-a

Charcoal

Made form the partial burning of wood in the absence of oxygen, charcoal was essential for much industrial innovation until the mass exploitation of coal. Nowadays the main market is for barbeques. English hardwoods make excellent charcoal but face competition from cheaper and less sustainable imports. For more information on the history of charcoa...
Found on http://www.coppice-products.co.uk/Glossary.htm

Charcoal

One of the most basic drawing materials, known since antiquity. It is usually made of thin peeled willow twigs which are heated without the presence of oxygen. This produces black crumbly sticks, which leave microscopic sharp-edged particles in the paper or textile fibres, producing a line denser at the pressure point, but more diffuse at the edges...
Found on http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/definition.jsp?entryId=428
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