pile

  1. a collection of objects laid on top of each other
  2. (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent
  3. informal: a large sum of money
  4. battery consisting of voltaic cells arranged in series; the earliest electric battery devised by Volta
  5. a column of wood or steel or concrete that is driven into the ground to provide support for a structure
  6. the yarn (as in a rug or vel......

    PILE

    A wood, metal or concrete pole driven into the bottom. Craft may be made fast to a pile; it may be used to support a pier (see PILING) or a float

    pile

    1 Raised, upper surface of carpeting or other textile such as velvet, also known as the nap, and made either by teasing or combing a woven surface, or by shearing looped ends that are woven or 'knotted' into a fabric. See also flat-weave. 2 The obverse die in coin-making.

    Pile

    A soft fabric made from strands of yarn, designed to be high lofting and soft to touch. Often used in fleece construction as a wool alternative.
    Found on http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/glossary

    Pile

    A long substantial pole of wood, concrete or metal, driven into the earth or sea bed to serve as a support or protection.
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20127

    pile

    [n] - informal: a large sum of money 2. [n] - a collection of objects laid on top of each other 3. [n] - a column of wood or steel or concrete that is driven into the ground to provide support for a structure 4. [n] - the yarn (as in a rug or velvet) that stands up from the weave 5. [v] - place or lay as if in a pile
    Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=pile

    Pile

    A deep foundation. These are formed by creating a hole deep enough to locate solid sub-soil. The hole is usually filled with concrete and reinforced or a section of solid steel is installed.
    Found on http://www.selfbuildabc.co.uk/self-build-glossary.html

    Pile

    A deep foundation. These are formed by creating a hole deep enough to locate solid sub-soil. The hole is usually filled with concrete and reinforced or a section of solid steel is installed.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20704

    Pile

    A steel section driven to the ground to form part of a foundation system for a structure. (Sheet piling, a series of interlocking steel sections driven into the ground to retain material or water.)
    Found on http://www.corusconstruction.com/en/design_guidance/the_blue_book/

    Pile

    Pile noun [ Latin pilus hair. Confer Peruke .] 1. A hair; hence, the fiber of wool, cotton, and the like; also, the nap when thick or heavy, as of carpeting and velvet. « Velvet soft, or plush with shaggy pile Cowper. 2. (Zoology) A ...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/87

    Pile

    Pile transitive verb To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles. To sheet-pile , to make sheet piling in or around. See Sheet piling , under 2nd Piling .
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/87

    pile

    1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; often with up; as, to pile up wood. 'Hills piled on hills.' . 'Life piled on life.' . 'The labour of an age in piled stones.' (Milton) ... 2. To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load. To pile arms or muskets, to place...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

    pile

    heap noun a collection of objects laid on top of each other
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    pile

    noun a column of wood or steel or concrete that is driven into the ground to provide support for a structure
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    pile

    (pīl) hemorrhoid. in nucleonics, a chain-reacting fission device for producing slow neutrons and radioisotopes. sentinel pile a hemorrhoid-like thickening of the mucous membrane at the lower end of an anal fissure.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

    Pile

    • (v. t.) To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles. • (n.) A funeral pile; a pyre. • (n.) The head of an arrow or spear. • (n.) A hair; hence, the fiber of wool, cotton, and the like; also, the nap when thick or heavy, as of carpeting and velvet. • (v. t.) To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to hea...
    Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/pile/

    pile

    in textiles, the surface of a cloth composed of an infinite number of loops of warp threads, or else of an infinite number of free ends of either ... [5 related articles]
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/67

    pile

    in building construction, a postlike foundation member used from prehistoric times. In modern civil engineering, piles of timber, steel, or concrete ... [5 related articles]
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/67

    Pile

    [heraldry] In heraldry, a pile is a charge usually counted as one of the ordinaries (figures bounded by straight lines and occupying a definite portion of the shield). It consists of a wedge emerging from the upper edge of the shield and converging to a point near the base. If it touches the base, it is blazoned throughout. == Variant posit...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pile_(heraldry)

    Pile

    In heraldry, a pile is one of the ordinaries or subordinaries having the form of a wedge, usually placed palewise, with the broadest end uppermost.
    Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/UP.HTM

    Pile

    The visible surface of a carpet, consisting of yarn or fiber tufts in loops that can be either cut or uncut. Also known as the `face` or `nap` of a carpet.
    Found on http://www.camelotcarpetmills.com/glossary_of_terms

    Pile

    [abstract data type] In computer science, a pile is an abstract data type for storing data in a loosely ordered way. There are two different usages of the term; one refers to an ordered deque, the other to an improved heap. ==Ordered deque== The first version combines the properties of the deque and a priority queue and may be described as ...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pile_(abstract_data_type)

    Pile

    [textile] In textiles, pile is the raised surface or nap of a fabric, which is made of upright loops or strands of yarn. Examples of pile textiles are carpets, corduroy, velvet, plush, and Turkish towels. The word is derived from Latin pilus for `hair` The surface and the yarn in these fabrics also called `pile`. In particular `pile length`...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pile_(textile)

    pile

    A structural timber driven deep into soil or rock to provide a secure foundation for structures
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113

    pile

    Often used to describe single-sided fleeces that are thicker and furrier than the typical two-sided fabrics.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21117
    No exact match found