Intelligence

A general concept of mental ability, often summed up as the ability to learn from experience. The concept was put into a measurable form as intelligence quotient, but theorists such as Howard Gardner believe there are multiple intelligences which traditional IQ tests do not sample. Others counter that multiple intelligences are merely manifestations of an underlying general factor ('Spearman's g......

Intelligence

Intelligence has been defined in many different ways such as in terms of one`s capacity for logic, abstract thought, understanding, self-awareness, communication, learning, emotional knowledge, memory, planning, creativity and problem solving. It can also be more generally described as the ability to perceive and/or retain knowledge or informatio....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence

Intelligence

• (n.) Acquaintance; intercourse; familiarity. • (n.) Information communicated; news; notice; advice. • (n.) The capacity to know or understand; readiness of comprehension; the intellect, as a gift or an endowment. • (n.) Knowledge imparted or acquired, whether by study, research, or experience; general information. • (n.) ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/intelligence/

intelligence

(in-tel´ĭ-jәns) the ability to acquire knowledge and use it effectively; it is a combination of reasoning, memory, imagination, and judgment, with each of these aspects depending on the others. artificial intelligence a branch of computer science in which machines are made to p...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

intelligence

(L. intelligere to understand) the ability to comprehend or understand.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio46.html

Intelligence

(Lat. intelligent, from intellegere, to understand) The capacity of the mind to meet effectively -- through the employment of memory, imagination and conceptual thinking -- the practical and theoretical problems with which it is confronted. Intelligence is more inclusive than intellect which is primarily conceptual. See Intellect. In Dewey (q.v.),....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/i.html

intelligence

noun secret information about an enemy (or potential enemy); `we sent out planes to gather intelligence on their radar coverage`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

intelligence

intelligence service noun a unit responsible for gathering and interpreting information about an enemy
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

intelligence

(government) In military and political affairs, information, often secretly or illegally obtained, about other countries. Counter-intelligence is information on the activities of hostile agents. Much intelligence is gained by technical means, such as satellites and the electronic intercept...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012052.html

intelligence

(psychology) In psychology, a general concept that summarizes the abilities of an individual in reasoning and problem solving, particularly in novel situations. These consist of a wide range of verbal and nonverbal skills and therefore some psychologists dispute a unitary concept of intelligen...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012051.html

Intelligence

[newspaper] The Intelligence was a weekly newspaper published in Bowral, New South Wales in 1884. ==History== The Intelligence was first published on 8 October 1884 by William and Daniel Beer, who also published the Bowral Free Press. The Intelligence and the Bowral Free Press were intended to operate as separate newspapers and content in o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence_(newspaper)

Intelligence

[solitaire] Intelligence is a Patience game which uses two decks of playing cards mixed together. It is basically a two-deck version of another solitaire game La Belle Lucie and its game play is somewhat closer to the parent game than its cousins House in the Wood and House on the Hill. ==Rules== First, 18 piles (or fans) of three cards are...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence_(solitaire)

Intelligence

In·tel'li·gence noun [ French intelligence , Latin intelligentia , intellegentia . See Intelligent .] 1. The act or state of knowing; the exercise of the understanding. 2. The capacity to know or understand; readiness of comprehension; the intellect, as a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/74

intelligence

in government and military operations, evaluated information concerning the strength, activities, and probable courses of action of foreign countries ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/27

intelligence

In military and political affairs, information, often secretly or illegally obtained, about other countries. Counter-intelligence is information on the activities of hostile agents. Much...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

intelligence

in military science, information concerning an enemy or an area. The term is also used for an agency that gathers such information.
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/27

intelligence

intelligence 1. The ability to learn facts and skills and apply them; especially, when this ability is highly developed. 2. The capacity to acquire and apply knowledge or the faculty of thought and reason. 3. Information about secret plans or activities; especially, those of foreign governments, the armed forces, business enemies, or criminals. 4....
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1075/

Intelligence

Intelligence is almost impossible to define! This is because 'What is intelligence' is an ongoing and controversial debate in the psychology of individual differences. Simply put intelligence is the demonstration of our ability to problem-solve. Intelligence is influenced by our genetics inherited from our birth parents, and learning experiences in...
Found on http://www.gerardkeegan.co.uk/glossary/gloss_a.htm

intelligence

intelligence, in psychology, the general mental ability involved in calculating, reasoning, perceiving relationships and analogies, learning quickly, storing and retrieving information, using language fluently, classifying, generalizing, and adjusting to new situations. Alfred Binet, the French psyc...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0825311.html

Intelligence

Level of intellectual ability, particularly as measured by IQ (intelligence quotient) tests.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20212

Intelligence

The ability of a system to use general information to respond appropriately to specific events.
Found on http://www.wildpackets.com/resources/compendium/glossary_of_networking_term

intelligence

The ability to comprehend or understand. ... Origin: L. Intelligere = to understand ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Intelligence

The capacity of an individual to deal with the environment in a logical way demonstrating reasoning power, comprehension, speed, accuracy and communication ability.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

Intelligence

The global capacity to profit from experience and to go beyond given information about the environment.
Found on http://www.apa.org

Intelligence

The result of collecting, evaluating, analyzing, integrating and interpreting information from open and covert sources.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary350.php
No exact match found