imprinting

See genomic imprinting.

Imprinting

• (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Imprint
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/imprinting/

imprinting

(im-print┬┤ing) a rapid kind of learning of certain species-specific behavior patterns that occurs with exposure to the proper stimulus at a critical stage of early life. genomic imprinting differential expression of a gene or genes as a function of inheritance from the male versus t...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

imprinting

1. <genetics> A remarkable genetic phenomenon. The gist is that gene expression depends on the sex of the transmitting parent. There is, for example, increased severity of neurofibromatosis when the gene for it came from the mother. ... 2. <psychology> A particular kind of learning characterised by occurrence in very early life, rapidit...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

imprinting

noun a learning process in early life whereby species specific patterns of behavior are established
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Imprinting

[genetics] ==Summary== Moth Complex Live @ The Village in Dublin 2007 ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imprinting_(genetics)

Imprinting

[organizational theory] In organizational theory and organizational behavior, imprinting is a core concept describing how the past affects the present. Imprinting is generally defined as a process whereby, during a brief period of susceptibility, a focal entity or actor (such as an industry, organization, or an individual) develops characte...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imprinting_(organizational_theory)

Imprinting

[psychology] In psychology and ethology, imprinting is any kind of phase-sensitive learning (learning occurring at a particular age or a particular life stage) that is rapid and apparently independent of the consequences of behavior. It was first used to describe situations in which an animal or person learns the characteristics of some sti...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imprinting_(psychology)

Imprinting

A chemical modification of a gene allele which can be used to identify maternal or paternal origin o
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22391

Imprinting

A phenomenon in which the disease phenotype depends on which parent passed on the disease gene. For
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22391

Imprinting

A primitive form of learning in which some infant animals physically follow and form an attachment to the first moving object they see and/or hear.
Found on http://www.apa.org

Imprinting

A process where DNA obtains biochemical marks that instruct a cell how and when to express certain genes. Imprinting often results in gene expression from only one copy of a gene
Found on http://www.cat-world.com.au/glossary

imprinting

A rapid and irreversible learning process which occurs soon after a bird is hatched. During imprinting a bird learns to recognize its parents and identify with them. If it associates with humans during this period, it will identify with people.
Found on http://www.dvrconline.org/glossary.html

Imprinting

A rapid learning process that takes place early in the life of a social animal, usually in the bird family, and establishes a behavior pattern involving recognition of and attraction to identifiable attributes of its own kind or of a substitute.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22217

Imprinting

A term in ethology referring to a process similar to rapid learning or behavioral patterning that oc
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22394

Imprinting

describes a psychological process where a young bird or animal identifies with a figure present early in life; birds raised by humans form inappropriate bonds with humans and may later be unable to form pair bonds with their own species; imprinted birds are typically unable to be released to the wild
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22220

Imprinting

Genetic phenomenon in which only one of two alleles is actively expressed in an individual, depending on the sex of the parent from which the gene came.
Found on http://www.sheepusa.org/

imprinting

imprinting, acquisition of behavior in many animal species, in which, at a critical period early in life, the animals form strong and lasting attachments. Imprinting is important for normal social development. The term was first used by the zoologist Konrad Lorenz to describe the way in which the so...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0825053.html

imprinting

In ethology, the process whereby a young animal learns to recognize both specific individuals (for example, its mother) and its own species. Imprinting is characteristically an automatic response to specific stimuli at a time when the animal is especially sensitive to those stimuli (the sensitive period). Thus, goslings learn to recognize their mot...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0008043.html

imprinting

in psychobiology, a form of learning in which a very young animal fixes its attention on the first object with which it has visual, auditory, or ... [8 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/13

imprinting

process of transferring writing from a master copy to another form. There are three basic methods of imprinting: (1) spirit hectograph master cards, ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/13

Imprinting

Technique which applies variable copy to blank or pre-printed labels with a secondary device.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Imprinting

The action of isolating each individual vertebra of the spine, using either the breath and/or moveme
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Health/Pilates/

Imprinting

The physiological and behavioral process by which migratory fish assimilate environmental cues to aid their return to their stream of origin as adults.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21804

imprinting

Type: Term Pronunciation: im′print-ing Definitions: 1. A particular kind of learning characterized by its occurrence in the first few hours of life; determines species-recognition behavior.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=43905
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