Broach

a point when a boat sailing down wind loses control and spins broadside onto the wind

Broach

When a sailing vessel loses control of its motion and is forced into a sudden sharp turn, often heeling heavily and in smaller vessels sometimes leading to a capsize. The change in direction is called broaching-to. Occurs when too much sail is set for a strong gust of wind, or in circumstances where the sails are unstable.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms

Broach

• (n.) A broad chisel for stonecutting. • (n.) To spit; to pierce as with a spit. • (n.) A spit. • (n.) To make public; to utter; to publish first; to put forth; to introduce as a topic of conversation. • (n.) A tool of steel, generally tapering, and of a polygonal form, with from four to eight cutting edges, for smoothing ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/broach/

broach

(brōch) an elongated, tapered, and serrated cutting tool for shaping and enlarging holes. barbed b.; root canal b. barbed broach a thin, flexible, hand-operated or engine-driven endodontic instrument, usually tapered, with a series of sharply pointed barbs alon...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

broach

1. To spit; to pierce as with a spit. 'I'll broach the tadpole on my rapier's point.' (Shak) ... 2. To tap; to pierce, as a cask, in order to draw the liquor. Hence: To let out; to shed, as blood. 'Whereat with blade, with bloody blameful blade, He bravely broached his boiling bloody breast.' (Shak) ... 3. To open for the first time, as stores. 'Yo...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

broach

initiate verb bring up a topic for discussion
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Broach

[sailing] A sailboat broaches when its heading suddenly changes towards the wind due to wind/sail interactions for which the rudder cannot compensate. This causes the boat to enter a Death roll, rolling dangerously and if not controlled may lead to a capsize and turning turtle. This happens when the aerodynamic force on the rig greatly exce...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broach_(sailing)

Broach

Broach noun [ Middle English broche , French broche , from Late Latin brocca ; probably of Celtic origin; confer W. proc thrust, stab, Gael. brog awl. Confer Brooch .] 1. A spit. [ Obsolete] « He turned a broach that had worn a crown.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/100

Broach

Broach transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Broached ; present participle & verbal noun Broaching .] [ French brocher , from broche . See Broach , noun ] 1. To spit; to pier...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/100

Broach

A broach is a broad chisel used by masons for stonecutting.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AB.HTM

Broach

A long, tapered cutting tool with serration's which, when forced through a hole or across a surface, cuts a desired shape or size.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/b/r/broach/source.html

Broach

A long, tapered cutting tool with serration's which, when forced through a hole or across a surface,
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Business/Machine_Shop/

broach

a triangular face that enables a square tower to turn into an octagonal spire
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20559

broach

bring up a topic for discussion
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/1108220

broach

bring up a topic for discussion
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/148713

broach

bring up announce begin to talk about 
Found on http://www.graduateshotline.com/list.html

Broach

In architecture, a broach or broche is a spire rising directly from a tower, there being no intermediate parapet. The terms broach and broche were originally old English terms for a church spire, the specific definition originated in Leicestershire and spread into general use during the 19th century.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TB.HTM

Broach

The turning of a boat broadside to the wind or waves, subjecting it to possible capsizing.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21453

Broach

The unwetting of a foil with resultant loss of lift due to the foil coming near to or penetrating the air-water interface.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20083

Broach

To drill or cut out material left between closely spaced drill holes. Also, a mason
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

Broach

To drill or cut out material left between closely spaced drill holes; a mason's sharp-pointed chisel for dressing stone; an inclined piece of masonry filling the triangular space between the base of an octagonal spire and the top of a square tower; a type of chisel used for working narrow surfaces.
Found on http://www.contractorschoolonline.com/Masonry-Glossary.aspx

broach

Type: Term Pronunciation: brōch Definitions: 1. A dental instrument for removing the pulp of a tooth or exploring the canal.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=12360

Broach

When a keelboat sailing on a run capsizes from a strong puff of wind or gets knocked down by a wave. Also called a Knockdown or a Wipeout.
Found on http://www.mmsn.org/resources/glossary.html

Broach

When a sailing vessel loses control of its motion and is forced into a sudden sharp turn, often heeling heavily and in smaller vessels sometimes leading to a capsize. The change in direction is called broaching-to. Occurs when too much sail is set for a strong gust of wind, or in circumstances where the sails are unstable.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms

broach

[v] - bring up a topic for discussion
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=broach
No exact match found