verse

  1. literature in metrical form
  2. a piece of poetry
  3. a line of metrical text

Verse

• (v. t.) To tell in verse, or poetry. • (n.) A portion of an anthem to be performed by a single voice to each part. • (n.) A piece of poetry. • (n.) Metrical arrangement and language; that which is composed in metrical form; versification; poetry. • (n.) A stanza; a stave; as, a hymn of four verses. • (n.) A short div...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/verse/

verse

(from the article `literature`) ...on an analysis of poetry, because the aesthetic problems of literature are there presented in their simplest and purest form. Poetry that fails as ... Sensible things have been said on the question. The poet T.S. Eliot suggested that part of the difficulty lies in the fact that there is the ... ...o...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/v/17

verse

1. A line consisting of a certain number of metrical feet (see Foot, 9) disposed according to metrical rules. ... Verses are of various kinds, as hexameter, pentameter, tetrameter, etc, according to the number of feet in each. A verse of twelve syllables is called an Alexandrine. Two or more verses form a stanza or strophe. ... 2. Metrical arrangem...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

verse

noun a line of metrical text
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

verse

noun a piece of poetry
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Verse

[poetry] In the countable sense, a verse is formally a single metrical line in a poetic composition. However, verse has come to represent any division or grouping of words in a poetic composition, with groupings traditionally having been referred to as stanzas. In the uncountable (mass noun) sense verse refers to `poetry` as contrasted to p...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verse_(poetry)

Verse

[river] Verse is a river of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verse_(river)

Verse

Verse intransitive verb To make verses; to versify. [ Obsolete] « It is not rhyming and versing that maketh a poet.» Sir P. Sidney.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/V/18

Verse

Verse noun [ Middle English vers , Anglo-Saxon fers , Latin versus a line in writing, and, in poetry, a verse, from vertere , versum , to turn, to turn round; akin to English worth to become: confer French vers . See Worth to become, and confer...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/V/18

Verse

Verse transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Versed ; present participle & verbal noun Versing .] To tell in verse, or poetry. [ Obsolete] « Playing on pipes of corn and versing love.» Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/V/18

verse

A general word for all kinds of poetry. Also a synonym for a line of poetry, or a synonym for a stanza, esp. in a song.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

verse

a piece of poetry
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/844476

verse

Arrangement of words in a rhythmic pattern, which may depend on the length of syllables (as in Greek or Latin verse), or on stress, as in English. Classical Greek verse depended upon quantity, a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

verse

Arrangement of words in a rhythmic pattern, which may depend on the length of syllables (as in Greek or Latin verse), or on stress, as in English. Classical Greek verse depended upon quantity, a long syllable being regarded as occupying twice the time taken up by a short syllable. In English verse syllables are either stressed (strong) or unstresse...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0015718.html

verse

as a mass noun, poetry in general (but in a non-judgmental sense); and, as a regular noun, a line of poetry.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Verse

As a mass noun, poetry in general (but in a non-judgmental sense)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

Verse

Either a definite number of lines of poetry (see stanza) or a general term for poetic composition. Verse, however,  is often used to refer to work  of a slightly lower standard  than  'poetry'. See also parnassian.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

Verse

In music, a verse is a portion of an anthem to be performed by a single voice to each part.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VV.HTM

Verse

In poetry, a group of lines constituting a unit. In liturgical music for the Catholic Church, a phra
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

Verse

In popular songs a verse is the section of the song in which different sets of words are sung to the same repeated melody. This is in contrast to a chorus in which the words and melody are both repeated.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/soldonsong/glossary/v.shtml

Verse

Poetic lines composed in a measured rhythmical pattern, that are often, but not necessarily, rhymed.
Found on http://www.word-mart.com/html/glossary3.html

Verse

See below poetry,
Found on https://glossary.wein-plus.eu/verse

Verse

There are three general meanings for verse (1) a line of metrical writing, (2) a stanza, or (3) any
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Verse

Verse is the principal unit by which metrical compositions are measured. generally speaking, it is equivalent to what we term commonly the line. The elementary unit of metrical compositions is the 'foot' - i.e. a little group of one or more syllables measured either by accent or by quantity. The verse in turn consists of a certain number of these f...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AV.HTM
No exact match found