Rhyme

A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds in two or more words, most often in the final syllables of lines in poems and songs. The word `rhyme` may also be used as a pars pro toto to refer a short poem, such as a rhyming couplet or other brief rhyming poem such as nursery rhymes. ==Function of rhyme== Rhyme partly seems to be enjoyed simply as a.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhyme

Rhyme

A rhyme occurs when words share the same stressed vowel phoneme, eg she/tea, way/delay and subsequent consonant(s) eg sheet/treat, made/lemonade and final unstressed vowel eg laughter/after.
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Rhyme

• (n.) To accord in rhyme or sound. • (n.) Correspondence of sound in the terminating words or syllables of two or more verses, one succeeding another immediately or at no great distance. The words or syllables so used must not begin with the same consonant, or if one begins with a vowel the other must begin with a consonant. The vowel so...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/rhyme/

rhyme

rime noun correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Rhyme

Rhyme intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Rhymed ; present participle & verbal noun Rhyming .] [ Middle English rimen , rymen , Anglo-Saxon rīman to count: confer French rimer to rhyme. See ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/78

Rhyme

Rhyme noun [ Middle English ryme , rime , Anglo-Saxon rīm number; akin to Old High German rīm number, succession, series, German reim rhyme. The modern sense is due to the influence of French rime , which is of German origin, and originally the s...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/78

Rhyme

Rhyme transitive verb 1. To put into rhyme. Sir T. Wilson. 2. To influence by rhyme. « Hearken to a verser, who may chance Rhyme thee to good.» Herbert.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/78

Rhyme

Also spelled rime, rhyme is a matching similarity of sounds in two or more words, especially when th
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

rhyme

correspondence in the final sounds of two or more lines
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/134886

rhyme

correspondence in the final sounds of two or more lines
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206

rhyme

Correspondence of sound, usually in the final syllable or group of syllables in lines of verse, as in `There was once an old man with a beard/Who said, `It is just as I feared.` The rhyme depends on the vowel sounds and all the consonants except the first. Avoided in Japane...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0011766.html

rhyme

normally end-rhyme, that is, lines of verse characterized by the consonance of terminal words or syllables. Rhymed words conventionally share all sounds following the word's last stressed syllable. Thus 'tenacity' and 'mendacity' rhyme, but not 'jaundice' and 'John does,' or 'tomboy' and 'calm bay.' The rhyme scheme is usually the pattern of end-rh...
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Rhyme

Normally end-rhyme, that is, lines of verse characterized by the consonance of terminal words or syl
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

Rhyme

Rhyme is Jamaican slang for to joke, to tell a funny story.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZR.HTM

rhyme

rhyme or rime,the most prominent of the literary artifices used in versification. Although it was used in ancient East Asian poetry, rhyme was practically unknown to the ancient Greeks and Romans. With the decline of the classical quantitative meters and the substitution of accentual meters, rhyme b...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0841753.html

rhyme

Similarity of sounds in two or more words, esp. at the end of the lines of a poem. The rhyme scheme is given like that: abba abba cdc dcd (example of a sonnet). See end-rhyme and internal rhyme.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

rhyme

the correspondence of two or more words with similar-sounding final syllables placed so as to echo one another. Rhyme is used by poets and ... [8 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/44

Rhyme

The effect produced when similar vowel sounds chime together and where the final consonant sound is also in agreement e.g. 'bat' and 'cat'. (See also assonance - which occurs when the vowel sounds are similar but where the consonant sounds are different.)
Rhyme is normally divided into masculine and feminine rhymes. Masculine or single rhymes...
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

Rhyme

The similarity between syllable sounds at the end of two or more lines.
Found on http://www.word-mart.com/html/glossary3.html

rhyme

[n] - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds) 2. [v] - be similar in sound, esp. with respect to the last syllable 3. [v] - compose rhymes
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=rhyme
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