prose

  1. ordinary writing as distinguished from verse
  2. matter of fact, commonplace, or dull expression

Prose

Prose is a form of language that exhibits a grammatical structure and a natural flow of speech rather than a rhythmic structure (as in traditional poetry). While there are critical debates on the construction of prose, its simplicity and loosely defined structure have led to its adoption for use in the majority of spoken dialogue, factual discours...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prose

Prose

written language which does not follow poetic or dramatic forms.
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Prose

• (v. t.) To write in prose. • (v. i.) To write prose. • (a.) Pertaining to, or composed of, prose; not in verse; as, prose composition. • (v. t.) To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way. • (a.) Possessing or exhibiting unpoetical characteristics; plain; dull; prosaic; as, the prose duties of life. • (n.) H...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/prose/

prose

1. The ordinary language of men in speaking or writing; language not cast in poetical measure or rhythm; contradistinguished from verse, or metrical composition. 'I speak in prose, and let him rymes make.' (Chaucer) 'Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.' (Milton) 'I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

prose

noun ordinary writing as distinguished from verse
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Prose

Prose adjective 1. Pertaining to, or composed of, prose; not in verse; as, prose composition. 2. Possessing or exhibiting unpoetical characteristics; plain; dull; prosaic; as, the prose duties of life.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/178

Prose

Prose intransitive verb 1. To write prose. « Prosing or versing, but chiefly this latter.» Milton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/178

Prose

Prose noun [ French prose , Latin prosa , from prorsus , prosus , straight forward, straight on, for proversus ; pro forward + versus , past participle of vertere to turn. See Verse .] 1. The ordinary language of men in speakin...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/177

Prose

Prose transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Prosed ; present participle & verbal noun Prosing .] 1. To write in prose. 2. To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/178

Prose

Any material that is not written in a regular meter like poetry. Many modern genres such as short st
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

prose

Any piece of writing that is not presented in lines but narrated in normal form of spoken or written language, e.g. short stories, novels, drama, but also newspaper reports, essays, speeches etc. The coherent text may only be interrupted by paragraphs.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

prose

continuous, non-end-stopped writing that has other traits of poetry and is, from its context, associated with poems.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Prose

Prose is ordinary spoken or written language, untrammelled by poetic measure, and thus used in contradistinction to verse or poetry.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AP.HTM

prose

prose [Lat. prosa oratio=straightforward, or direct, speech], meaningful and grammatical written or spoken language that does not utilize the metrical structure, word transposition, or rhyme characteristic of poetry or verse; it is, however, raised above the level of lifeless composition or commonpl...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0840279.html

prose

See below Quotes,
Found on https://glossary.wein-plus.eu/prose

prose

Spoken or written language without regular metre; in literature, prose corresponds more closely to the patterns of everyday speech than poetry, and often uses standard grammar and syntax and...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

prose

Spoken or written language without regular metre; in literature, prose corresponds more closely to the patterns of everyday speech than poetry, and often uses standard grammar and syntax and traditional rhetoric to achieve its ends. In Western literature prose was traditionally used for what is today called non-fiction – that is, histo...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012670.html

prose

[n] - matter of fact, commonplace, or dull expression 2. [n] - ordinary writing as distinguished from verse
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=prose
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