portal

A web page that provides a single point of entry for a suite of web-accessible services. ISPs provide portals for their subscribers. Especially important for WAP services because users need consistent and simple interfaces but WAP portals tend to be controlled by mobile network operators and can result in a `walled garden` environment.

Portal

In architecture a portal is a lesser gate, where there are two of different dimensions. Formerly the term portal meant a small square corner in a room separated from the rest of the apartment by wainscoting, forming a short passage to another apartment. By the twentieth century the term portal had become analogous with the French portail, used to d...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TP.HTM

Portal

[magic trick] `Portal` is a magic trick performed by the illusionist David Copperfield, in which he takes a member of the audience and transports both of them to a pre-selected location (Hawaii, The Hoover Dam, Australia), before reappearing on stage. This effect has been performed in David Copperfield`s show since 2001. Portal was out of t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal_(magic_trick)

portal

Any doorway or entrance but especially one that is large and imposing.
Found on http://www.pitt.edu/~medart/menuglossary/INDEX.HTM

Portal

A Web site that acts as a doorway or introduction to many other Web sites that are sometimes grouped into categories [Yahoo is a famous example].
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20134

Portal

A web-site or service that offers a window into a broad array of resources and services. A portal also allows the provider and/or user to customise the content of the web-site to meet individual needs.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20195

portal

[n] - a grand and imposing entrance (often extended metaphorically)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=portal

portal

doorway or carriageway, especially of a fort-gateway
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/glos_rom.htm

Portal

Literally a gateway. Used to mean intelligent browser software that allows users to personalise their search engine, to define websites and document libraries and subject interest profile so that they are alterted when new documents that meet their subject interest profiles are added to those sites/libraries. Provides unified access to internal doc...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20462

Portal

a website that aims to be a 'doorway' to the World-Wide Web, typically offering a search engine and/or links to useful pages, and possibly news or other services - these services are usually provided for free in the hope that users will make the site their default home page or at least visit it often - most portals exist to generate advertising inc...
Found on http://www.archivemag.co.uk/

Portal

Web site which offers users a range of content and services, often including some kind of directory of search functionality and acting as a gateway to the internet or a sub-set of it.
Found on http://www.agbnielsen.net/glossary/glossaryQ.asp?type=alpha&jump=none

Portal

Marketing term to describe a website that is the first place people see when using the web. A ‘portal site` generally has a catalogue of websites and/or a search engine. Portal site may also offer e-mail and other services to entice people to use that particular site as the ‘point of entry` of choice.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Portal

Concerning entrance to an organ, especially that through which blood is carried to liver.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20900

Portal

a very impressive, even monumental entrance or porch, to a building, courtyard etc
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Portal

A doorway or entrance, especially one that is large and imposing.
Found on http://www.virtualani.org/glossary/index.htm

Portal

A website which is designed to be a user`s main point of entry to the web. Portals attempt to achieve this by providing assistance, usually in navigation (Yahoo, Google) or information (FT.com).
Found on http://www.ft.com/dbglossary

Portal

Por'tal noun [ Old French portal , French portail , Late Latin portale , from Latin porta a gate. See Port a gate.] 1. A door or gate; hence, a way of entrance or exit, especially one that is grand and imposing. « Thick with sparkling orient gems The
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/130

Portal

Por'tal adjective (Anat.) Of or pertaining to a porta, especially the porta of the liver; as, the portal vein, which enters the liver at the porta, and divides into capillaries after the manner of an artery. » Portal is applied to other veins which break up into capillaries; a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/130

portal

1. A door or gate; hence, a way of entrance or exit, especially one that is grand and imposing. 'Thick with sparkling orient gems The portal shone.' (Milton) 'From out the fiery portal of the east.' (Shak) ... 2. The lesser gate, where there are two of different dimensions. Formerly, a small square corner in a room separated from the rest of the ap...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

portal

(por´tәl) porta. pertaining to an entrance, especially the porta hepatis.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Portal

• (n.) The space, at one end, between opposite trusses when these are terminated by inclined braces. • (a.) Of or pertaining to a porta, especially the porta of the liver; as, the portal vein, which enters the liver at the porta, and divides into capillaries after the manner of an artery. • (n.) Formerly, a small square corner in a r...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/portal/

portal

(from the article `architecture`) ...significance. The stairway, employed in the past to give `monumentality` to important buildings, frequently became more expressive than ... Throughout this period, as in the Romanesque period, the best sculptors were extensively employed on architectural decoration. The most important ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/97

portal

(from the article `coal mining`) Accesses to a coal seam, called portals, are the first to be completed and generally the last to be sealed. A large coal mine will have several ... ...and chambers are excavated from the inside—with the overlying material left in place—and then lined as necessary to support the adjacent ground....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/97

Portal

The structure surrounding the immediate entrance to a mine; the mouth of an adit or tunnel.
Found on http://www.coaleducation.org/glossary.htm

portal

A planar frame where the lateral and bending forces are transferred by moment resisting connections from the portal rafters to the columns
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113
No exact match found