Hysteresis

Hysteresis is the dependence of the output of a system not only on its current input, but also on its history of past inputs. The dependence arises because the history affects the value of an internal state. To predict its future outputs, either its internal state or its history must be known. If a given input alternately increases and decreases, ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hysteresis

Hysteresis

(Dielectric) - Loss of energy caused by conversion to heat when the dielectric of, for example, a capacitor is stressed. (Magnetic) - Lagging of magnetization of iron behind the magnetic field intensity.
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html

hysteresis

(his″tә-re´sis) a time lag in the occurrence of two associated phenomena, as between cause and effect. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pu...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

hysteresis

[n] - the lagging of an effect behind its cause
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=hysteresis

Hysteresis

• (n.) A lagging or retardation of the effect, when the forces acting upon a body are changed, as if from velocity or internal friction; a temporary resistance to change from a condition previously induced, observed in magnetism, thermoelectricity, etc., on reversal of polarity.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/hysteresis/

hysteresis

<physics> A lagging or retardation of the effect, when the forces acting upon a body are changed, as if from velocity or internal friction; a temporary resistance to change from a condition previously invuced, observed in magnetism, thermoelectricity, etc, on reversal of polarity. ... Origin: NL, fr. Gr. To be behind, to lag. ... Source: Webs...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Hysteresis

[economics] In economics, hysteresis refers to the possibility that periods of high unemployment tend to increase the rate of unemployment, below which inflation begins to accelerate, commonly referred to as the natural rate of unemployment or non-accelerating inflation rate of unemployment (NAIRU). The term is based on the physical phenome...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hysteresis_(economics)

Hysteresis

Hys`te·re'sis noun [ New Latin , from Greek ... to be behind, to lag.] (Physics) A lagging or retardation of the effect, when the forces acting upon a body are changed, as if from velocity or internal friction; a temporary resistance to change from a condition previously induced, observed in...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/85

Hysteresis

1. The failure of an economic variable to return to its initial equilibrium after a temporary shock. For example, an industry or trade flow might disappear due to an exchange rate change, then not reappear after the change is reversed. 2. A time lag between a cause and an effect. (Though this seems to be the more standard dictionary definition, eco...
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/h.html

hysteresis

a hypothesized property of unemployment rates -- that there is a ratcheting effect, so a short-term rise in unemployment rates tends to persist. Theories that would lead to hysteresis: -- an insider/outsider model of decisionmaking about employment; insiders such as the unionized workers ratchet up wage rates beyond where it is profitable to hire t...
Found on http://www.econterms.com/glossary.cgi?query=hysteresis

Hysteresis

A property of physical and chemical systems that do not instantly follow the forces applied to them, but react slowly, or do not return completely to their original state. In the case of magnetic systems, when an external magnetic field is applied to a magnetic material, the material becomes magnetised absorbing some of the external field. When the...
Found on http://www.mpoweruk.com/glossary.htm

Hysteresis

A term that describes the behavior of a structural member subjected to reversed, repeated load into the inelastic range whose plot of load verses displacement is characterized by loops. The amount of energy dissipated during inelastic loading is indicated by the enclosed area within these loops. [] [I]
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO

hysteresis

As applied to timber's moisture content, the tendency of dried wood to reach equilibrium with any specified temperature and relative humidity at a lower moisture content when absorbing moisture from a drier state than when losing moisture from a wetter state
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113

hysteresis

hysteresis (his"turē'sis) , phenomenon in which the response of a physical system to an external influence depends not only on the present magnitude of that influence but also on the previous history of the system. Expressed mathematically, the response to the external influence is a d...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0824792.html

hysteresis

hysteresis 1. A delayed response by an object to changes in the forces acting on it; especially, magnetic forces. 2. The lagging of an effect behind its cause, as when the change in magnetism of a body lags behind changes in the magnetic field. 3. A condition in which the state of a system depends on its previous history, generally the retardatio...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/4318/

hysteresis

Hysteresis is a hypothesized property of unemployment rates: that there is a ratcheting effect, so a short-term rise in unemployment rates tends to persist....
Found on http://www.oenb.at/dictionary/termini.jsp?EINTRAG_ID=16408

Hysteresis

Hysteresis is a lag in a variable of a system, with respect to the effect causing the variation.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GH.HTM

Hysteresis

If the input varies from an initial point to a final point and then retraces its value back to the initial point, then the two paths of the output should be identical. If there is hysteresis in the system then the output paths will not coincide.Magnetic HysteresisThe irreversible magnetic flux density versus magnetic field strength (B-versus-H) beh...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/h/y/hysteresis/source.html

Hysteresis

In economics, hysteresis refers to the assumption that the present level of an economic variable depends on past levels. For example, when unemployment rises, a new classical economist would expect wages to fall and the demand for labour to rise, so that unemployment would quickly disappear. If there is hysteresis, however, this may not occur since...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/JH.HTM

hysteresis

lagging of an effect behind its cause
Found on http://phrontistery.info/h.html

hysteresis

lagging of the magnetization of a ferromagnetic material, such as iron, behind variations of the magnetizing field. When ferromagnetic materials are ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/93

hysteresis

phenomenon represented by a characteristic curve which has a branch, called ascending branch, for increasing values of the input variable, and a different branch, called descending branch, for decreasing values of the input variable
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=351-24-15

Hysteresis

Shift in calibration of transducer when on 'return' from actuation load.
Found on http://www.aeroconsystems.com/glossary.htm

Hysteresis

Shift in calibration of transducer when on 'return' from actuation load.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Rockets/

Hysteresis

The ability of a flexible polyurethane foam to return to its original support characteristics after it is compressed. Hysteresis = (25%)
Found on http://www.pfa.org/jifsg/jifsgs15.html
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