Gain

The difference or increase in audio levels from one point in the circuit to another.

Gain

In architecture a gain is a square or bevelled notch cut out of a girder, binding joist, or other timber which supports a floor beam, so as to receive the end of the floor beam.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TG.HTM

Gain

A measure of the increase in forward transmitter power of an antenna or telescope with respect to that of an isotropic radiator. An antenna is said to have a 'directivity' since it directs more energy in one direction. It is proportional to the aperture area of the telescope and inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength. Even small ...
Found on http://www.coseti.org/glossary.htm

Gain

Any increase or decrease in strength of an electrical signal. Gain is often measured in terms of decibels, the logarithmic ratio of input to output.
Found on http://www.zoo.co.uk/~z0001325/Glossary.html

gain

[n] - the amount by which the revenue of a business exceeds its cost of operating 2. [v] - earn on some commercial or business transaction 3. [v] - obtain advantages, such as points, etc. 4. [v] - increase in 5. [v] - increase (one`s body weight)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=gain

Gain

1) Knob usually found at the top of each input channel on the soundboard. Used to set input levels of the separate channels to relatively equal positions.
2) The amount of increase in audio signal strength, often expressed in dB.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Gain

level of amplification of a given signal... Sound professionals tend to use this term where the layman may say 'volume'. The amount by which a circuit amplifies a signal.
Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl

Gain

The amount chargeable to capital gains tax (CGT) from gains made on the disposal of an asset. In... <a target=_blank href='http://www.finance-glossary.com/terms/gain.htm?id=609&ginPtrCode=00000&PopupMode=false' title='Read full definition of gain'>more</a>
Found on http://www.finance-glossary.com/pages/home.htm

Gain

The ratio of the output level of a circuit to the input. This will be positive for an amplifier and negative for an attenuator.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/g/a/gain/source.html

Gain

A general term used to denote an increase in signal power in transmission from one point to another. Usually expressed in dB, for a microwave tube the power gain is the ratio of the output signal power to the drive signal power.
Found on http://www.albacom.co.uk/Web/Site/defence/glossary.html

Gain

Strictly speaking, another way of describing Proportional terms. Also occasionally used in the same way as Stability to describe the overall P.I.D. performance of a drive speed and current loops. See also P.I.D.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20823

Gain

The amount of amplification used in an electrical circuit. Gain is usually measured in decibels, but it can also be expressed as the ratio of output power to input power.
Found on http://www.flowmeterdirectory.com/flowmeter_technical_glossary/flowmeter_te

GAIN

Genetic Association Information Network
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20895

Gain

A method of adjusting a CCD sensor's sensitivity to light.
Found on http://www.rodsmith.org.uk/photographic%20glossary/rods%20photographic%20gl

Gain

Gain (gān) noun [ Confer W. gan a mortise.] (Architecture) A square or beveled notch cut out of a girder, binding joist, or other timber which supports a floor beam, so as to receive the end of the floor beam.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/2

Gain

Gain adjective [ Middle English gein , gain , good, near, quick; confer Icelandic gegn ready, serviceable, and gegn , adverb , against, opposite. Confer Ahain .] Convenient; suitable; direct; near; handy; dexterous; easy; profitable; cheap; respectable. [ Obsolete or ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/2

Gain

Gain transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Gained (gānd); present participle & verbal noun Gaining .] [ From gain , noun but. probably influenced by French gagner to earn, gain, Old Fr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/2

Gain

Gain intransitive verb To have or receive advantage or profit; to acquire gain; to grow rich; to advance in interest, health, or happiness; to make progress; as, the sick man gains daily. « Thou hast greedily gained of thy neighbors by extortion.» Ezek. xxii. 12. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/2

gain

<physics> (Amplification) Increase in a signal transmitted from one point to another through an amplifier. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

gain

take in verb earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages; `How much do you make a month in your new job?`; `She earns a lot in her new job`; `this merger brought in lots of money`; `He clears $5,000 each month`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

gain

verb rise in rate or price; `The stock market gained 24 points today`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Gain

A profit on a securities transaction recognized by selling a security for more than the security originally cost. The gain is the difference between the cost and the sale.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosg.htm

gain

(gān) the increase achieved by amplification of a signal. brightness gain a factor in intensification of radiographs; minification factor multiplied by flux gain. flux gain in radiology, acceleration of electrons that strike the output phosphor in radi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Gain

• (n.) A square or beveled notch cut out of a girder, binding joist, or other timber which supports a floor beam, so as to receive the end of the floor beam. • (n.) To reach; to attain to; to arrive at; as, to gain the top of a mountain; to gain a good harbor. • (n.) To get, incur, or receive, as loss, harm, or damage. • (v. t.)...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/gain/

gain

(from the article `amplifier`) ...control and measuring instruments, radar, and countless other devices all depend on this basic process of amplification. The overall amplification ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/g/2
No exact match found