folding

  1. bend or lay so that one part covers the other
  2. intertwine
  3. incorporate a food ingredient into a mixture by repeatedly turning it over without stirring or beating
  4. cease to operate or cause to cease operating

Folding

• (n.) The keepig of sheep in inclosures on arable land, etc. • (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Fold • (n.) The act of making a fold or folds; also, a fold; a doubling; a plication.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/folding/

Folding

[chemistry] In chemistry, folding is the process by which a molecule assumes its shape or conformation. The process can also be described as intramolecular self-assembly, a type of molecular self-assembly, where the molecule is directed to form a specific shape through noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folding_(chemistry)

Folding

[DSP implementation] Folding is a transformation technique using in DSP architecture implementation for minimizing the number of functional blocks in synthesizing DSP architecture. Folding was first developed by Keshab K Parhi and his students in 1992. Its concept is contrary to unfolding. Folding transforms an operation from a unit-time pr...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folding_(DSP_implementation)

Folding

Fold'ing noun 1. The act of making a fold or folds; also, a fold; a doubling; a plication. « The lower foldings of the vest.» Addison. 2. (Agriculture) The keepig of sheep in inclosures on arable land, etc. Folding boat , a portable boat...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/53

folding

1. The act of making a fold or folds; also, a fold; a doubling; a plication. 'The lower foldings of the vest.' (Addison) ... 2. <agriculture> The keepig of sheep in inclosures on arable land, etc. Folding boat, a portable boat made by stretching canvas, etc, over jointed framework, used in campaigning, and by tourists, etc. Folding chair, a c...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

folding

1) Description (French brassage, brasser = stir) for vigorous shaking of bottles during the bottle fermentation of a sparkling wine to suspend the yeasts and take full advantage of their effects. 2) name for the unwanted renewed yeast fermentation in the production of sparkling wine, which is caused by a faulty d├ęgorgement or an insufficient one f...
Found on https://glossary.wein-plus.eu/folding

Folding

confining sheep (or other livestock) onto a restricted area for feeding, such as a temporarily fenced part of a root crop field, especially when done repeatedly onto a sequence of areas.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_ovine_terminology

Folding

Folding doubling up a sheet of paper so that one part lies on top of another. Folding stresses the paper fibers. To create a smooth, straight fold, heavy papers, like cover stocks and bristols, need to be scored before they're folded. Multiple fold strength is important in printed pieces like books, maps, and pamphlets. It's far less important in o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Folding

one of the best ways of encouraging gluten development in slack doughs. Folding the dough consists of taking a wet dough out of the bowl, spreading it out a little on a clean, well-floured surface, folding it in thirds like a letter, rotating it 90 degrees and folding it up again, picking it up and dusting the loose flour off of it, and then return...
Found on http://www.thefreshloaf.com/faqs/glossary

Folding

The deformation of rock layers because of compressive forces to form folds.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/f.html

Folding

The most usual word for an upper edge treatment where a narrow margin of the edge is folded over, skived and secured by adhesive, also called beading.
Found on http://www.pinzashoes.com/
No exact match found