Dementia

[Literally, to lose one's mind.] A generic term for a number of progressive medical conditions, all characterised by a gradual loss of perceptual, memory, and higher cognitive functions. The best known dementia is Alzheimer's disease, but see also multiple-infarct dementia and compare senile dementia.
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Dementia

In DSM-5 the decision was taken to rename the dementias as neurocognitive disorders, with various degrees of severity. ==Signs and symptoms== Dementia affects the brain`s ability to think, reason and remember clearly. The most common affected areas include memory, visual-spatial, language, attention, and executive function (problem solving). Most....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dementia

dementia

(dә-men´shә) a general loss of mental abilities, including impairment of memory and often impairments in speech, coordination, ability to understand sensory stimuli, and other mental faculties. Many different conditions can cause dementia; some are reversible and some are progressive with widespread da...
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dementia

(de- + L. mens mind) (DSM III) an organic mental disorder characterized by a general loss of intellectual abilities involving impairment of memory, judgment, and abstract thinking as well as changes in personality. It does not include loss of intellectual functioning caused by clouding of consciousness (as in delirium) nor that caused by depressi.....
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dementia

[n] - mental deterioration of organic or functional origin
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Dementia

• (n.) Insanity; madness; esp. that form which consists in weakness or total loss of thought and reason; mental imbecility; idiocy.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/dementia/

dementia

<neurology, psychiatry> An organic mental disorder characterised by a general loss of intellectual abilities involving impairment of memory, judgment and abstract thinking as well as changes in personality. ... It does not include loss of intellectual functioning caused by clouding of consciousness (as in delirium) nor that caused by depressi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

dementia

dementedness noun mental deterioration of organic or functional origin
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Dementia

De·men'ti·a noun [ Latin , from demens . See Dement .] Insanity; madness; esp. that form which consists in weakness or total loss of thought and reason; mental imbecility; idiocy.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/32

Dementia

a broad complex of symptoms such as disorientation, confusion, memory loss, impaired judgment, and alterations in mood and personality--symptoms can arise from a variety of causes.
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dementia

A condition in which a person loses the ability to think, remember, learn, make decisions, and solve problems. Symptoms may also include personality changes and emotional problems. There are many causes of dementia, including Alzheimer disease, brain cancer, and brain injury. Dementia usually gets worse over time.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=D

Dementia

A deterioration of intellectual faculties e.g. memory, concentration and judgment resulting from an organic disease or disorder of the brain and often accompanied by emotional disturbances and personality changes.
Found on https://www.cchne.com/glossary.php

dementia

A deterioration of intellectual faculties, such as memory, concentration and judgment, resulting from an organic disease or disorder of the brain. It is sometimes accompanied by emotional disturbance and personality changes.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22236

Dementia

A general term for a group of symptoms such as loss of memory judgment, language, complex motor skills and other intellectual functions caused by the permanent damage or destruction of the brain.
Found on http://www.newtonpresbyterianmanor.org/glossary

Dementia

a gradual decline in mental ability usually caused by a brain disease, such as Alzheimer disease
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Dementia

An chronic organic mental illness which produces a global deterioration in cognitive abilities and which usually runs a deteriorating course.
Found on http://www.priory.com/gloss.htm

DEMENTIA

An umbrella term for a range of symptoms which manifest a decline in intellectual functioning caused by a disease or other injury to the brain. The most common symptom involves loss of memory. From a psychosocial perspective dementia is a disability characterised by impaired memory & ability to remember, learn new material, a high level of stress &...
Found on http://dementia.ie/information/glossary1

DEMENTIA

chronic loss of mental capacity. Dementia may involve progressive deterioration of thinking, memory, and motor function, and may also be associated with personality changes and psychological symptoms such as depression.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22225

dementia

chronic, usually progressive deterioration of intellectual capacity associated with the widespread loss of nerve cells and the shrinkage of brain ... [5 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/28

dementia

dementia (di MEN shuh, di MEN shee uh) 1. The loss, usually progressive, of cognitive and intellectual functions, without impairment of perception or consciousness; caused by a variety of disorders, (structural or degenerative) but most commonly associated with structural brain disease. 2. An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of inte...
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dementia

dementia (dimen'shu) [Lat.,=being out of the mind], progressive deterioration of intellectual faculties resulting in apathy, confusion, and stupor. In the 17th cent. the term was synonymous with insanity, and the term dementia praecox was used in the 19th cent. to describe the condition now know...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0815111.html

Dementia

Dementia a general term for a decline in mental ability severe enough to interfere with daily life. Memory loss is an example. Alzheimer's is the most common type of dementia, accounting for 60-80% of cases. Dementia is not a specific disease. It's an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or other ...
Found on http://www.patientinstitute.org/glossary/

Dementia

Dementia is a serious loss of cognitive ability in a previously unimpaired person, beyond what might be expected from normal aging. It may be static, the result of a unique global brain injury, or progressive, resulting in long-term decline due to damage or disease in the body. Although dementia is far more common in the geriatric population, it ma...
Found on https://www.hhtotalcare.com/news-resources/glossary-of-terms/

Dementia

Dementia is characterised by confusion, memory loss, poor problem-solving and poor concentration. There are many diseases that lead to dementia, the most common being Alzheimer's disease, Dementia usually occurs in older people. Dementia in people under 65 is known as early onset dementia. Dementia wiht Lewy bodies (DLB) is a rarer form of dementia...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21465

Dementia

Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. While memory loss is a common symptom of dementia, memory loss by itself does not mean that a person has dementia. Doctors diagnose dementia only if two or more brain functions — such as memo...
Found on https://www.the-colony.org/resources/glossary/
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