Bog

A type of wetland that accumulates appreciable peat deposits. Bogs depend primarily on precipitation for their water source, and are usually acidic and rich in plant residue with a conspicuous mat of living green moss.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20094

Bog

(SMP) A wet, spongy, poorly drained area which is usually rich in very specialized plants, contains a high percentage of organic remnants and residues and frequently is associated with a spring, seepage area, or other subsurface water source. A bog sometimes represents the final stage of the natural processes of eutrophication by which lakes and ot...
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20127

bog

[n] - wet spongy ground of decomposing vegetation
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=bog

Bog

Characterised by the very wet conditions and the deep layer of peat on which the vegetation grows. Mosses from the genus Sphagnum are frequently the most dominant species. The soil conditions are always acidic, water saturated and nutrient-poor.
Found on http://www.botanicalkeys.co.uk/flora/content/glossary.html

Bog

Bog noun [ Ir. & Gael. bog soft, tender, moist: confer Ir. bogach bog, moor, marsh, Gael. bogan quagmire.] 1. A quagmire filled with decayed moss and other vegetable matter; wet spongy ground where a heavy body is apt to sink; a marsh; a morass. « Appalled with thoughts of
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/74

Bog

Bog transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Bogged ; present participle & verbal noun Bogging .] To sink, as into a bog; to submerge in a bog; to cause to sink and stick, as in mud and mire. « At another time, he was bogged...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/74

bog

A quagmire covered with grass or other plants, wet, spongy ground, a small marsh, plant community on wet, very acid peat. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

bog

peat bog noun wet spongy ground of decomposing vegetation; has poorer drainage than a swamp; soil is unfit for cultivation but can be cut and dried and used for fuel
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Bog

• (n.) A quagmire filled with decayed moss and other vegetable matter; wet spongy ground where a heavy body is apt to sink; a marsh; a morass. • (v. t.) To sink, as into a bog; to submerge in a bog; to cause to sink and stick, as in mud and mire. • (n.) A little elevated spot or clump of earth, roots, and grass, in a marsh or swamp.B...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/bog/

bog

(from the article `Slavic religion`) In a series of Belorussian songs a divine figure enters the homes of the peasants in four forms in order to bring them abundance. These forms are: ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/85

bog

type of wetland ecosystem characterized by wet, spongy, poorly drained peaty soil. Bogs can be divided into three types: (1) typical bogs of cool ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/85

Bog

Bog is British slang for a lavatory.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZBA.HTM

Bog

A habitat that consists of waterlogged spongy ground. Common vegetation are sedges and sphagnum moss. Bogs are common in Canada, Russia, and Scandinavia.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/b.html

bog

An acidic wetland habitat with no natural surface water inlet or outlet, with an accumulation of Sphagnum moss.
Found on http://www.neonaturalist.com/nature/nature_glossary.html

bog

bog, very old lake without inlet or outlet that becomes acid and is gradually overgrown with a characteristic vegetation (see swamp). Peat moss, or sphagnum, grows around the edge of the open water of a bog (peat is obtained from old bogs) and out on the surface. With its continued growth, the moss ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0808099.html

Bog

Bog is the name given to a piece of wet, soft, and spongy ground, where the soil is composed mainly of decaying and decayed vegetable matter. Such ground is valueless for agriculture until reclaimed, but often yields abundance of peat for fuel.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AB.HTM

bog

Type of wetland where decomposition is slowed down and dead plant matter accumulates as peat. Bogs develop under conditions of low temperature, high acidity, low nutrient supply, stagnant water, and oxygen deficiency. Typical bog plants are sphagnum moss, rushes, and cotton grass; insectivorous plants such as sundews and bladderworts are common...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006359.html

BoG

Board of Governors
Found on http://www.iodp.org/acronyms/

BoG

Board of governors
Found on http://www.hefce.ac.uk/news/hefce/2009/lmu/glossary.htm

Bog

A bog is a mire that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss. It is one of the four main types of wetlands. Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire and muskeg; alkaline mires are called fens. They are frequently covered in ericaceous shrubs rooted in the sphagnum moss and pea...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bog

bog

a permanently wet area that gets water only from precipitation. Bogs usually lack drainage and are characterized by a high content of organic matter, extreme acidity and low fertility.
Found on http://www.njwildlifetrails.org/OutontheTrails/GlossaryofNaturerelatedTerms

Bog

Freshwater wetlands that are poorly drained and characterized by a buildup of peat.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21804

Bog

Wet, acidic peat
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22113

Bog

Area of soft, spongy, naturally waterlogged ground, typically having an acidic substrate of sphagnum moss and peat, in which characteristic shrubs and herbs and sometimes trees grow.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22218

bog

swamp; spongy ground
Found on http://insectzoo.msstate.edu/Glossary/
No exact match found