algae

A non-taxonomic term used to group several phyla of the lower plants, including the Rhodophyta > Rhodophyta (red algae), Chlorophyta > Chlorophyta (green algae), Phaeophyta > Phaeophyta (brown algae), and Chrysophyta > Chrysophyta (diatoms). Many algae are unicellular or consist of simple undifferentiated colonies, but red and brown algae are complex multicellular organisms, familiar to most people as seaweeds. Blue-green algae are a totally sepa … ...

Algae

aquatic plants that lack a vascular system. Some are microscopic and others are large. Examples are pond scum, kelp and red tides.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20003

Algae

Simple rootless plants that grow in sunlit waters in proportion to the amount of available nutrients. They can affect water quality adversely by lowering the dissolved oxygen in the water. They are food for fish and small aquatic animals.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20094

algae

Simple rootless plants that grow in sunlit waters in relative proportion to the amounts of nutrients available. They are food for fish and small aquatic animals.
Found on http://cdiac.ornl.gov/glossary.html

Algae

Minute free-floating plants present in pond water that feed on dissolved minerals from decaying plants and soil washed into the pond. They are vital to the life-cycles of many creatures.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/htbg/glossary/algae.shtml

Algae

Swimming pool chemistry: Over 20,000 species known to man! Algae may form on your pool surfaces or it may bloom in suspension. We typically know algae to be green, but it may also be yellow (mustard algae), black, blue-green or any shade in between. It may form separate spots, or seem to grow in sheets. Pink algae, is not algae at all, but a form o...
Found on http://www.1st-direct.com/acatalog/Chemical_Glossary.html

Algae

Microorganisms that may grow to colonies in damp environments, including certain rooftops. They can discolor shingles. Often described as 'fungus.'
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

algae

<botany> A nontaxonomic term used to group several phyla of the lower plants, including the Rhodophyta (red algae), Chlorophyta (green algae), Phaeophyta (brown algae) and Chrysophyta (diatoms). ... Many algae are unicellular or consist of simple undifferentiated colonies, but red and brown algae are complex multicellular organisms, familiar ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

algae

(al´je) a group of plants living in the water, including all seaweeds, and ranging in size from microscopic cells to fronds hundreds of feet long. blue-green algae former name for members of the group now called Cyanobacteria.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Algae

• (pl. ) of Alga
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/algae/

algae

members of a group of predominantly aquatic, photosynthetic organisms of the kingdom Protista. They range in size from the tiny flagellate Micromonas ... [32 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/44

algae

Type: Term Pronunciation: al′jē Definitions: 1. A division of eukaryotic, photosynthetic, nonflowering organisms that includes many seaweeds.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=2154

Algae

Plant-like organisms which grow in water and attach themselves to aquarium glass, plants, rocks, decorations, etc. There are many types of Algae. An overgrowth of algae is generally considered unsightly and a nuisance (but see Aufwuchs) and can create water quality problems. Always present in water, their growth is stimulated by excessive nutrients...
Found on http://www.aquahobby.com/articles/e_glossary.php

Algae

This is a very basic type of plant in a aquarium, and bloody annoying. There are many types, you can remove it by brushes, scrapers, and chemical treatments can be used, but will also affect your other plants in your tank.
Found on http://www.tropicalfishcentre.co.uk/Glossary.htm

Algae

A simple photosynthetic plant that usually lives in moist or aquatic environments. The bodies of algae can be unicellular or multicellular is design.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/a.html

Algae

Primitive plants, usually aquatic, capable of synthesizing their own food by photosynthesis.
Found on http://www.electromn.com/glossary/a.htm

algae

Representatives of the major division of algae A large, diverse group of simple photosynthetic organisms, all of which are eukaryotes. They occur in aquatic environments or in moist locations on land. The body of an alga may be unicellular, or multicellular in the form of filaments, ribbons, or ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/A/algae.html

algae

Primitive plants, usually aquatic, capable of synthesizing their own food by photosynthesis. For more on algae, see the algae entry in the Encyclopedia of Science.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/A/AE_algae.html

algae

algae (ăl'jē) [plural of Lat. alga=seaweed], a large and diverse group of primarily aquatic plantlike organisms. These organisms were previously classified as a primitive subkingdom of the plant kingdom, the thallophytes (plants that lack true roots, stems, leaves, and flowers). More...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0803306.html

Algae

Photosynthetic, almost exclusively aquatic, nonvascular plants that range in size from simple unicellular forms to giant kelps several feet long. They have extremely varied life cycles and first appeared in the Precambrian.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21202

algae

Highly varied group of plants, ranging from single-celled forms to large and complex seaweeds. They live in both fresh and salt water, and in damp soil. Algae do not have true roots, stems, or leaves. Marine algae help combat global warming by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0010671.html

Algae

Rootless plants that grow in sunlit waters in relative proportion to the amounts of nutrients available. They can affect water quality adversely by lowering the dissolved oxygen in the water. They are food for fish and small aquatic animals. However, when algae exists in excess, it takes away oxygen from the water, thus killing all life.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21291

algae

simple aquatic organisms that carry out photosynthesis; seaweeds are marine algae
Found on http://www.pbs.org/kqed/oceanadventures/glossary/

Algae

Algae (iː or iː; singular alga ə, Latin for `seaweed`) are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic organisms, ranging from unicellular genera such as Chlorella and the diatoms to multicellular forms such as the giant kelp, a large brown alga that may grow up to 50 meters in length. Most are autotrophic and lack many of the distinct cell .....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algae

algae

mainly aquatic organisms that differ from plants because of a lack of true stems, roots, and leaves
Found on http://www.windowsintowonderland.org/eobe/glossary.shtml
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