thixotropy

the property exhibited by a fluid that is in a liquid state when flowing and in a semisolid, gelled state when at rest. Most drilling fluids must be thixotropic so that cuttings will remain in suspension when circulation is stopped.

thixotropy

‘Memory` property of a fluid (especially of solder paste) whereby its viscosity (resistance to flow) depends on its recent history of flow and not just on the force applied to it. See also shear thinning.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870

Thixotropy

Thixotropy is a shear thinning property. Certain gels or fluids that are thick (viscous) under static conditions will flow (become thin, less viscous) over time when shaken, agitated, or otherwise stressed (Time Dependent Viscosity). They then take a fixed time to return to a more viscous state. In more technical language: some non-Newtonian pseud...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thixotropy

thixotropy

(thik-sot´rә-pe) the property of certain gels of becoming fluid when shaken or otherwise agitated and then becoming semisolid again at rest.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Thixotropy

A property of paint whereby it has a gelled structure when undisturbed but when stirred is quite mobile. This is caused by weak chemical bonds that set up in the paint when it is static, but are easily broken down when stirred. Products are usually made thixotropic to aid application. Tomato sauce is an everyday example of a thixotropic product.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20471

thixotropy

reversible behaviour of certain gels that liquefy when they are shaken, stirred, or otherwise disturbed and reset after being allowed to stand. ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/40

thixotropy

temporary reduction in viscosity when shaken or stirred
Found on http://phrontistery.info/t.html

Thixotropy

that property of a lubricating grease which is manifested by a softening in consistency as a result of shearing followed by a hardening in consistency starting immediately after the shearing is stopped.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21121

thixotropy

The property of a material that causes it to change from a thick, pasty consistency to a fluid consistency upon agitation, brushing or rolling.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21303

thixotropy

The property of a material that causes it to change from a thick, pasty consistency to a fluid consistency upon agitation, brushing or rolling.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21452

Thixotropy

The property of a material that causes it to change from a thick, pasty consistency to a fluid consi
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22428

thixotropy

The property of certain gels of becoming less viscous when shaken or subjected to shearing forces and returning to the original viscosity upon standing (e.g., synovial fluid, ferrous hydroxide gel); a characteristic of a system exhibiting a decrease in viscosity with an increase in the rate of shear, usually a function of time. ... Synonym: reclott...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

thixotropy

thixotropy 1. The property, exhibited by certain gels, of becoming fluid when shaken or otherwise agitated and then becoming semisolid again at rest. 2. The property of certain gels of becoming less viscous when shaken or subjected to shearing forces and returning to the original viscosity upon standing.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2139/2

thixotropy

Type: Term Pronunciation: thik-sot′rŏ-pē Definitions: 1. The property of certain gels of becoming less viscous when shaken or subjected to shearing forces and returning to the original viscosity on standing (synovial fluid, ferrous hydroxide gel). 2. A characteristic of a system exhibiting a decrease in viscosity with an increase in...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=91665
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