Softwood

Wood from conifers.

softwood

Timber from cone-bearing trees which is generally softer than hardwood and therefore easier to work. Softwoods include pine, cedar, spruce and yew.

Softwood

Softwood is wood from gymnosperm trees such as conifers. Softwood is the source of about 80% of the world`s production of timber, with traditional centres of production being the Baltic region (including Scandinavia and Russia), North America and China. The term is opposed to hardwood, which is the wood from angiosperm trees. Softwoods are not ne....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Softwood

softwood

(from the article `Canada`) The dispute over softwood lumber imports into the U.S. moved toward a possible solution in 2004. During the summer it was announced that the U.S. ... Trees have been grouped in various ways, some of which more or less parallel their scientific classification: softwoods are conifers, and hardwoods ... [4 re...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/120

softwood

[adj] - made of the easy-to-cut wood of a coniferous tree, as e.g. pine 2. [n] - wood that is easy to saw (from conifers such as pine or fir)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=softwood

softwood

noun wood that is easy to saw (from conifers such as pine or fir)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

softwood

A general term for timber of trees classified botanically as Gymnosperm. Commercial timbers of this group are nearly all conifers. The term has no reference to the relative hardness of the wood
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113

Softwood

A tree belonging to the order Coniferales. Softwood trees are usually evergreen, bear cones and have needles or scalelike leaves. Examples include pines, spruces, firs and cedars. See conifer.
Found on https://www.ncforestry.org/teachers/glossary-of-forestry-terms/

softwood

Any coniferous tree (see conifer), or the wood from it. In general this type of wood is softer and easier to work, but in some cases less durable, than wood from flowering (or angiosperm) trees
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0007737.html

softwood

any tree in the gymnosperm group, including pines, hemlocks, larches, spruces, firs, and junipers. Softwoods often are called conifers although some, such as junipers and yews do not produce cones.
Found on http://www.dnr.state.md.us/forests/gloss.html

Softwood

Evergreen trees (spruce, fir and pine). The term does not refer to the hardness of the wood.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22428

Softwood

Softwood is a general term for timber from a coniferous tree such as fir, spruce or pine.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AS.HTM

Softwood

Softwood is the timber from fast growing evergreen trees. The term softwood is no indication of how soft or hard the timber is – some softwoods are harder than hardwood! Western Red Cedar for example has many qualities of hardwood (and is often used externally as cladding due to it’s durability) but is a softwood. See also Hardwood for more.
Found on http://www.woodworkersuk.co.uk/blog/carpentry-and-joinery-glossary/carpentr

Softwood

Softwood refers to the timber of coniferous trees.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21605

Softwood

Stems that have not yet become hard or woody.
Found on http://www.pcmg-texas.org/glossary_gardening_landscaping.htm

softwood

Timber from cone-bearing trees which is generally softer than hardwood and therefore easier to work. Softwoods include pine, cedar, spruce and yew.
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-s.html

Softwood

wood from a gymnosperm tree, i.e. trees in the divisions Pinophyta and Ginkgophyta Despite the name, not necessarily very soft or light wood (e.g. douglas-fir is a softwood).
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary096.htm

Softwood

Wood or lumber from conifers or evergreen trees such as pine or fir.
Found on http://www.furniturecaretips.com/glossary.htm
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