Phenomenon

A phenomenon (Greek: φαινόμενoν, phainomenon, from the verb φαίνειν, phainein, `to show, shine, appear, to be manifest (or manifest itself)`), plural phenomena, is any observable occurrence. Phenomena are often, but not always, understood as `appearances` or `experiences`. These are themselves sometimes understood as involvin...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenomenon

Phenomenon

• (n.) An appearance; anything visible; whatever, in matter or spirit, is apparent to, or is apprehended by, observation; as, the phenomena of heat, light, or electricity; phenomena of imagination or memory. • (n.) That which strikes one as strange, unusual, or unaccountable; an extraordinary or very remarkable person, thing, or occurrenc...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/phenomenon/

phenomenon

(fә-nom´ә-non) pl. phenom´ena any sign or objective symptom; any observable occurrence or fact.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

phenomenon

(from the article `typology`) ...by postulating specified attributes that are mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive—groupings set up to aid demonstration or inquiry by ... in logic, a stated regularity in the relations or order of phenomena in the world that holds, under a stipulated set of conditions, either ... [2 rel...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/55

phenomenon

(Gr. phainomenon thing seen) any sign or objective symptom; any observable occurrence or fact.
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio67.html

Phenomenon

(Gr. phainomenon, Ger. Phaenomenon) In Kant: Broadly, appearance or that which appears. More specifically, any presentation, cognition or experience whose form and order depends upon the synthetic forms of the sensibility and categories of the understanding. In contrast to noumenon and thing-in-itself which lie outside the conditions of possible e....
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phenomenon

noun any state or process known through the senses rather than by intuition or reasoning
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

phenomenon

[Noun] Plural form: phenomena Something that happens or exists, usually unusual.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Phenomenon

Phe·nom'e·non noun ; plural Phenomena . [ Latin phaenomenon , Greek faino`menon , from fai`nesqai to appear, fai`nein to show. See Phantom .] 1. An appearance; anything visible; whatever, in matter or spirit, is apparent to, or i...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/71

Phenomenon

a thing as it appears to be, as constructed by the mind and perceived by the senses (c.f. Noumenon).
Found on http://www.philosophybasics.com/general_glossary.html

Phenomenon

An optical effect which appears in certain gemstonematerials. Often revealed by or enhanced by proper fashioning.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22148

phenomenon

any state or process known through the senses
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/675552

phenomenon

any state or process known through the senses
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206

phenomenon

any state or process known through the senses
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/1160398

phenomenon

any state or process known through the senses
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/844476

phenomenon

any state or process known through the senses
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/683276

phenomenon

any state or process known through the senses
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/675552

phenomenon

in philosophy, any object, fact, or occurrence perceived or observed. In general, phenomena are the objects of the senses (e.g., sights and sounds) ... [9 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/55

phenomenon

Origin: L. Phaenomenon, Gr. Fainomenon, fr. Fainesqai to appear, fainein to show. See Phantom. ... 1. An appearance; anything visible; whatever, in matter or spirit, is apparent to, or is apprehended by, observation; as, the phenomena of heat, light, or electricity; phenomena of imagination or memory. 'In the phenomena of the material world, and in...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

phenomenon

phenomenon (s) (Greek > Latin) 1. An appearance; anything visible; whatever, in matter or spirit, is apparent to, or is apprehended by, observation; such as, the phenomenon of heat, light, or electricity; phenomenon of imagination or memory. 2. That which strikes one as strange, unusual, or unaccountable; such as, an extraordinary or very remar......
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1636/2

Phenomenon

Phenomenon is slang for a remarkable person.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZP.HTM

phenomenon

phenomenon, an observable fact or event; in philosophy the definitions and uses of the term have varied. In the philosophy of Aristotle phenomena were the objects of the senses (e.g., sights and sounds), as opposed to the real objects understood by the mind. Later, phenomena were considered the obse...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0838726.html

phenomenon

the object of knowledge, viewed empirically, in its fully knowable state (i.e., conditioned by space and time and the categories). (Cf. noumenon.)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21178

phenomenon

the object of knowledge, viewed empirically, in its fully knowable state (i.e., conditioned by space and time and the categories). (Cf. noumenon.)
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary074.htm

phenomenon

Type: Term Pronunciation: fĕ-nom′ĕ-non, -nă Definitions: 1. A symptom; an occurrence of any sort, whether ordinary or extraordinary, in relation to a disease. 2. Any unusual fact or occurrence.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=67893
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