pound

  1. 16 ounces
  2. the basic unit of money in Great Britain; equal to 100 pence
  3. the basic unit of money in Syria; equal to 100 piasters
  4. the basic unit of money in the Sudan; equal to 100 piasters
  5. the basic unit of money in Lebanon; equal to 100 piasters
  6. the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence
  7. the basic unit of money in Egypt; equal to 100 piasters
  8. the basic unit ......

    Pound

    1 British currency with a face value of 100 pence (20s), first struck in the form of gold coins in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Silver pounds appeared during the Civil War (1640s); the first £1 banknotes were issued as an emergency measure by the Bank of England between 1797 and 1826 but were not commonly seen until the introduction of the Treas …...

    Pound

    (from Latin pondus = weight) The Roman pound of 327.45 g was also the standard coin weight unit in the Early Middle Ages. Charlemagne raised the weight of the pound, but the extent is not known. The pound is not only the main currency of Great Britain, but also of other countries such as Cyprus, Syria and Sudan. Also in Ireland until the end of 200...
    Found on http://www.austrian-mint.com/5

    pound

    (from the article `telephone and telephone system`) ...digits (0 through 9) are assigned to specific push buttons, and the buttons are arranged in a grid with four rows and three columns. (The pad also ...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/102

    pound

    (lb) (pound) in the avoirdupois system, a unit of weight equal to 16 ounces (453.6 grams). in the apothecaries' system, a unit of weight equal to 12 ounces (373.2 grams).
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

    pound

    noun 16 ounces; `he got a hernia when he tried to lift 100 pounds`
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    pound

    dog pound noun a public enclosure for stray or unlicensed dogs; `unlicensed dogs will be taken to the pound`
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    pound

    (mass) Imperial unit of mass. The commonly used avoirdupois pound, also called the imperial standard pound (7,000 grains/0.45 kg), differs from the pound troy (5,760 grains/0.37 kg), which is used for weighing precious metals. It derives from the Roman libra, which w...
    Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012589.html

    pound

    (money) British standard monetary unit, issued as a gold sovereign before 1914, as a note 1914–83, and as a circular yellow metal-alloy coin from 1983. The pound is also the name given to the unit of currency in Egypt, Lebanon, Malta, Sudan, and Syria
    Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012590.html

    Pound

    (rail) Term describing the weight (and thus the cross section) of a length of rail. A heavier rail can carry heavier loads with less distortion and less damage to the rails themselves and the roadbed.
    Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary256.php

    Pound

    [currency] The pound is a unit of currency in some nations. The term originated in Great Britain as the value of a pound (weight) of silver. The word pound is the English translation of the Latin word libra, which was the unit of account of the Roman Empire. The British pound derived from the Roman libra, which is why the pound (mass) is of...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_(currency)

    Pound

    [currency] ], `mindful, no doubt of the power of the Duke of Norfolk in his county.` From 1570–72, he served as crown counsel, and, perhaps, it was Bell`s outspokenness, hitherto, that revealed his niche, as shortly following these events, he was recommended by William Cecil for Speaker (Prolocutor), elected by the House, and approved by E...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_(currency)|[£40

    Pound

    [force] The pound or pound force (symbol: lb, lbf, or lbf) is a unit of force in some systems of measurement including British engineering units and British gravitational units. == Definitions == ==Conversion to other units== == Foot-pound-second (FPS) systems of units == In some contexts, the term `pound` is used almost exclusively to refe...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_(force)

    Pound

    [magazine] Pound is a Toronto-based hip hop magazine that is distributed for free across Canada. Founded in 1998 and beginning publication in December 1999, Pound is published quarterly. As of July 2009, the magazine had published 42 issues. == History == Pound was founded by Rodrigo Bascunan, Andrew Cappell, Kostas Pagiamtzis and Christian...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_(magazine)

    Pound

    [mass] The pound or pound-mass (abbreviations: lb, lb``m``, lbm, ℔) is a unit of mass used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement. A number of different definitions have been used, the most common today being the international avoirdupois pound which is legally defined as exactly {val|0.45359237|u=kilogr...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_(mass)

    Pound

    [networking] Pound is a lightweight open source reverse proxy program and application firewall suitable to be used as a web server load balancing solution. Developed by an IT security company, it has a strong emphasis on security. The original intent on developing Pound was to allow distributing the load among several Zope servers running o...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_(networking)

    Pound

    Pound intransitive verb 1. To strike heavy blows; to beat. 2. (Machinery) To make a jarring noise, as in running; as, the engine pounds .
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/138

    Pound

    Pound noun [ Anglo-Saxon pund an inclosure: confer forpyndan to turn away, or to repress, also Icelandic pynda to extort, torment, Ir. pont , pond, pound. Confer Pinder , Pinfold , Pin to inclose, Pond .] 1. An inclosure, maintained by...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/138

    Pound

    Pound transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Pounded ; present participle & verbal noun Pounding .] [ Middle English pounen , Anglo-Saxon punian to bruise. Confer Pun a play on words.] 1. To strike re...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/138

    Pound

    A measure of weight equal to 16 ounces or, metrically, 453.6 grams. The word "pound" goes back to the Latin "pondo" which meant a "weight" (but one of only 12 ounces). The abbreviation for pound-just to confuse non-pound people-is lb. which stands for "libra" (Latin for pound).
    Found on http://www.obesityhelp.com/content/wls_glossary.html

    Pound

    A pen, often circular and stone-walled, for rounding up livestock.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

    Pound

    A section of a swale designed to detain runoff.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20453

    Pound

    a storage area for holding live lobster
    Found on http://www.parl.ns.ca/lobster/glossary.htm

    Pound

    Ancient Measurement Terms: 16 ounces (Avoirdupois).
    Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/measure.htm

    pound

    British standard monetary unit, issued as a gold sovereign before 1914, as a note 1914-83, and as a circular yellow metal-alloy coin from 1983. The pound is also the name given to the unit of...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688
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