Frigate

A frigate is a light-weight, fast and nimble warship. The term frigate was first used for a fully-rigged warship with a single complete gun deck during the 17th century, and these ships usually carried about 36 guns (mainly 4.5 inch calibre demi-culverins firing a 9 lb shot) and inferior to ships of the line were used for escort duties and as swift...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RF.HTM

frigate

[n] - a medium size square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuries 2. [n] - a United States warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
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frigate

Escort warship smaller than a destroyer. Before 1975 the term referred to a warship larger than a destroyer but smaller than a light cruiser. In the 18th and 19th centuries a frigate was a small,...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Frigate

Small to medium sized surface escort ships (approx 4,000 tons) and general 'workhorses' of the fleet. Used to be primarily designed for anti-submarine warfare but are increasingly used in general purpose roles. The RN currently has a total of 17 frigates of in 2 types: Type 22 (batch 3) and Type 23
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20777

Frigate

Frig'ate noun [ French frégate , Italian fregata , probably contracted from Latin fabricata something constructed or built. See Fabricate .] 1. Originally, a vessel of the Mediterranean propelled by sails and by oars. The French, about 1650, transferred the name to ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/77

frigate

1. Originally, a vessel of the Mediterranean propelled by sails and by oars. The French, about 1650, transferred the name to larger vessels, and by 1750 it had been appropriated for a class of war vessels intermediate between corvettes and ships of the line. Frigates, from about 1750 to 1850, had one full battery deck and, often, a spar deck with a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

frigate

noun a United States warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Frigate

• (n.) Any small vessel on the water. • (n.) Originally, a vessel of the Mediterranean propelled by sails and by oars. The French, about 1650, transferred the name to larger vessels, and by 1750 it had been appropriated for a class of war vessels intermediate between corvettes and ships of the line. Frigates, from about 1750 to 1850, had ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/frigate/

frigate

either of two different types of warships, of the 17th through the 19th centuries (see ) and of World War II and after.[3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/64

frigate

frigate (frig'it) , originally a long, narrow nautical vessel used on the Mediterranean, propelled by either oars or sail or both. Later, during the 18th and early 19th cent., the term was applied to a very fast, square-rigged sailing vessel carrying 24 to 44 guns on a single flush gun deck. Fri...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0819733.html

Frigate

A frigate t is any of several types of warship, the term having been used for ships of various sizes and roles over the last few centuries. In the 17th century, the term was used for any warship built for speed and maneuverability, the description often used being `frigate-built`. These could be warships carrying their principal battery of carri.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frigate
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