Drainage

Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from an area. Many agricultural soils need drainage to improve production or to manage water supplies. ==History== ===Early history=== The ancient Indus systems of sewerage and drainage that were developed and used in cities throughout the civilization were far more adv...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drainage

drainage

(drān´әj) systematic withdrawal of fluids and discharges from a wound, sore, or cavity.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

drainage

(water management) that part of irrigation or rainfall that runs off an area or is lost to deep percolation.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_environmental_science

Drainage

• (n.) The mode in which the waters of a country pass off by its streams and rivers. • (n.) The system of drains and their operation, by which superfluous water is removed from towns, railway beds, mines, and other works. • (n.) The act, process, or means of drawing off the pus or fluids from a wound, abscess, etc. • (n.) Area o...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/drainage/

drainage

<surgery> The systematic withdrawal of fluids and discharges from a wound, sore or cavity. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Drainage

[agriculture] Image created by User:Brenton.eccles, depicts the Wheel of the Year. yearwheel copy.gif ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drainage_(agriculture)

Drainage

[medical] In medicine, drainage refers to the removal of fluids from a body. Examples include thoracentesis and incision and drainage. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drainage_(medical)

Drainage

Drain'age noun 1. A draining; a gradual flowing off of any liquid; also, that which flows out of a drain. 2. The mode in which the waters of a country pass off by its streams and rivers. 3. (Engineering) The system of drains and their operation, by which superfluous wate...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/118

Drainage

An area (basin) mostly bounded by ridges or other similar topographic features, encompassing part, most, or all of a watershed and enclosing some 5,000 acres.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21804

drainage

Conduction of electric current from an underground metallic structure by means of a metallic conductor. Forced drainage is that applied to underground metallic structures by means of an applied electromotive force or sacrificial anode. Natural drainage is that from an underground structure to a more negative (more anodic) structure, such as the neg...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21115

drainage

drainage, in agriculture, the removal of excess water from the soil, either by a system of surface ditches, or by underground conduits if required by soil conditions and land contour. Diesel or centrifugal pumps are sometimes used to drain large areas. Drainage was practiced in the Nile basin c.400 ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0816058.html

drainage

drainage, in mining, removal of water seeping into shafts and other underground mine workings from the surrounding ground. Unless seeping water is removed continually, it may endanger haulage and mining equipment, weaken supporting structures, and, in some instances, flood the mine completely. Water...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0816059.html

Drainage

Getting water off the trail.
Found on http://www.americantrails.org/

Drainage

How readily the soil will allow water to flow freely through. For example, a garden bed that quickly gets and stays marshy, would not be considered to have good drainage.
Found on http://www.howtogardenadvice.com/garden_info/gardening_glossary.html

Drainage

How water moves through the soil. A real important factor for most plants and gardens. In general water should move through the soil whether in a garden or in a container somewhat easily. If there is standing water create better drainage by adding non-porous material.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20077

Drainage

Improving the productivity of agricultural land by removing excess water from the soil by such means
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22399

Drainage

Improving the productivity of agricultural land by removing excess water from the soil by such means as ditches or subsurface drainage tiles.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20094

drainage

in agriculture, the artificial removal of water from land; drainage is employed in the reclamation of wetlands, in the prevention of erosion, and as ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/72

Drainage

Movement of water away from the surface of a garden either down into the soil or by flow across the surface.
Found on http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/glossary.cfm

drainage

See below irrigation,
Found on https://glossary.wein-plus.eu/drainage

Drainage

The interception and removal of water from, on, or under an area or roadway; the process of removing surplus ground or surface water artificially; a general term for gravity flow of liquids in conduits.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21122

Drainage

The movement of water through the soil.
Found on https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/resource-library/vegetable-gardening-glossar

Drainage

the process of eliminating toxic wastes, even at a deep cellular level, out of the body via the main eliminative channels
Found on http://www.wholisticmedical.co.uk/glossary.php

Drainage

The process of removing surplus ground or surface water either by artificial means or by gravity flow.
Found on http://www.coaleducation.org/glossary.htm

Drainage

The process of removing surplus ground or surface water either by artificial means or by gravity flow.
Found on http://www.rocksandminerals.com/glossary.htm
No exact match found