cleavage

  1. the state of being split or cleft
  2. the breaking of a chemical bond in a molecule resulting in smaller molecules
  3. (embryology) the repeated division of a fertilised ovum
  4. the line formed by a groove between two parts (especially the separation between a woman's breasts)
  5. the act of cleaving or splitting

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cleavage

The property some minerals have of tending to split along clean planes in one or more directions. Not all minerals posses cleavage and many can be cleaved in several different directions. Cleavage is related to the minerals crystalline structure. (see mineral properties)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22290

cleavage

The tendency of certain minerals to break along distinct planes in their crystal structures where the bonds are weakest. Cleavage is tested by striking or hammering a mineral, and is classified by the number of surfaces it produces and the angles between adjacent surfaces.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

cleavage

Type of cleavage exhibited on minerals of the isometric system that are crystallized as cubes. The method of cleavage is that small cubes break off of an existing cube.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

cleavage

Type of cleavage exhibited on some prismatic minerals in which the mineral cleaves by breaking off thin, vertical, prismatic crystals off of the original prism. Example is Acmite.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

Cleavage

• (n.) The act of cleaving or splitting. • (n.) Division into laminae, like slate, with the lamination not necessarily parallel to the plane of deposition; -- usually produced by pressure. • (n.) The quality possessed by many crystallized substances of splitting readily in one or more definite directions, in which the cohesive attrac...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/cleavage/

cleavage

<cell biology> The early divisions of the fertilized egg to form blastomeres. The cleavage pattern is radial in some phyla, spiral in others. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

cleavage

(from the article `art conservation and restoration`) ...Canvas, however, will deteriorate with age and acidic conditions and may be easily torn. In many cases, parts of the paint and ground will lift ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/95

cleavage

(kle´vәj) division into distinct parts. the early successive splitting of a zygote (fertilized oocyte) into smaller cells (blastomeres) by mitosis.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

cleavage

1. of a mineral: The tendency of a mineral to split along planes determined by the crystal structure. 2. of a rock: see slaty cleavage
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22327

Cleavage

1.The breaking of a mineral along its crystallographic planes, thus reflecting crystal structure. 2.The property or tendency of a rock to split along parallel, closely spaced planar surfaces.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20131

cleavage

noun the act of cleaving or splitting
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Cleavage

[breasts] Cleavage, anatomically known as the intermammary cleft or the intermammary sulcus, is the space between a woman`s breasts, lying over the sternum. In popular culture, it is often defined by garments with low necklines, such as ball gowns, evening gowns, lingerie, and swimwear, that expose or highlight cleavage. Most people in West...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleavage_(breasts)

Cleavage

[crystal] Cleavage, in mineralogy, is the tendency of crystalline materials to split along definite crystallographic structural planes. These planes of relative weakness are a result of the regular locations of atoms and ions in the crystal, which create smooth repeating surfaces that are visible both in the microscope and to the naked eye....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleavage_(crystal)

Cleavage

[embryo] In embryology, cleavage is the division of cells in the early embryo. The zygotes of many species undergo rapid cell cycles with no significant growth, producing a cluster of cells the same size as the original zygote. The different cells derived from cleavage are called blastomeres and form a compact mass called the morula. Cleava...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleavage_(embryo)

Cleavage

[geology] Cleavage, in structural geology and petrology, describes a type of planar rock feature that develops as a result of deformation and metamorphism. The degree of deformation and metamorphism along with rock type determines the kind of cleavage feature that develops. Generally these structures are formed in fine grained rocks compose...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleavage_(geology)

Cleavage

[politics] In political science, cleavage is the division of voters into voting blocs. The preliminary assumption is that voters don’t come in predefined groups of pros and cons for or against a certain subject. Ballot analysis assumes that voters opt for a certain party, or decide for the solution or option that comes closest to their ow...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleavage_(politics)

Cleavage

Cleav'age noun 1. The act of cleaving or splitting. 2. (Crystallog.) The quality possessed by many crystallized substances of splitting readily in one or more definite directions, in which the cohesive attraction is a minimum, affording more or less smooth surfaces; the direction ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/90

Cleavage

A smooth, flat break or separation in a gem along thedirection of its atomic structure.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22148

Cleavage

Cleavage is the structural lines along which a mineral will break up when it is subjected to pressure, such as being struck a sharp blow. The regular structure of most crystallized bodies becomes manifest as soon as they are broken. Each fragment presents the form of a small polyhedron, and the very dust appears under the microscope an assemblage o...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/HC.HTM

cleavage

cleavage, tendency of many minerals to split along definite smooth planar surfaces determined by their crystal structure. The directions of these surfaces are related to weaknesses in the atomic structure of the mineral and are always parallel to a possible crystal face. The property of cleavage is ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0812496.html

Cleavage

Due to the internal arrangement of atoms, many minerals tend to break along a well defined set of lines. For further details, see the Fact File page.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20501

cleavage

in embryology, the first few cellular divisions of a zygote (fertilized egg). Initially, the zygote splits along a longitudinal plane. The second ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/95

cleavage

In geology and mineralogy, the tendency of a rock or mineral to split along defined, parallel planes related to its internal structure; the clean splitting of slate is an example. It is a useful distinguishing feature in rock and mineral identification. Cleavage occurs as a result of realignment of component minerals during deformation or metam...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0027828.html

Cleavage

in structural geology and petrology, term describing the tendency of a rock to break along preferred planes of weakness, caused by the development of a planar fabric as a result of deformation.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_geology
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