Chancel

In church architecture, the chancel (or presbytery) is the space around the altar in the sanctuary at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building, possibly including the choir. It may terminate in an apse. Following the exposition of the doctrine of transubstantiation at the fourth Lateran Council of 1215, clergy were requir...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chancel

Chancel

• (v. t.) All that part of a cruciform church which is beyond the line of the transept farthest from the main front. • (v. t.) That part of a church, reserved for the use of the clergy, where the altar, or communion table, is placed.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/chancel/

chancel

sanctuary noun area around the altar of a church for the clergy and choir; often enclosed by a lattice or railing
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Chancel

Chan'cel noun [ Old French chancel , French chanceau , cancel , from Latin cancelli lattices, crossbars. (The chancel was formerly inclosed with lattices or crossbars) See Cancel , transitive verb ] (Architecture) (a) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/53

Chancel

A chancel is that part of a church, reserved for the use of the clergy, where the altar, or communion table, is placed, that is the choir or eastern part of a church appropriated to the use of those who officiate in the performance of the services and separated from the nave and other portions in which the congregation assemble by a screen known as...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TC.HTM

chancel

chancel, primarily that part of the church close to the altar and used by the officiating clergy. In the early churches it was separated from the nave by a low parapet or open railing (cancellus), its name being thus derived. San Clemente at Rome has one of the few preserved examples. With the devel...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0811308.html

Chancel

Eastern part of the church in which the altar stands.
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/gloschur.htm

chancel

In architecture, the eastern part of a Christian church where the choir and clergy sit, formerly kept separate from the nave by an open-work screen or rail. In some medieval churches the screen is...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

chancel

In architecture, the eastern part of a Christian church where the choir and clergy sit, formerly kept separate from the nave by an open-work screen or rail. In some medieval churches the screen is very high, so that the congregation is completely shut off. The choir stalls and the rector's pew are in the chancel, and the altar or communion ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0022394.html

chancel

part of church containing altar and seats for choir
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chancel

Part of the church for the clergy and choir, near the altar, and usually enclosed.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21299

chancel

portion of a church that contains the choir, often at the eastern end. Before modern changes in church practice, only clergy and choir members were ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/53

Chancel

That part of a church interior reserved for clergy and containing the alter.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

Chancel

The area at the E end of the church in which the altar is usually located. Normally used to describe the area E of the crossing that continues the line of the nave. Often narrower than the nave. Chancel arch is the arch dividing the nave from the chancel.
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/gloschur.htm

Chancel

The area of the church containing the Sanctuary and Presbytery (the location of the high alter) separated from the secular activities of the Nave by a chancel or rood screen. A comparatively recent term arriving from the doctrine of transubstantiation in 1215 which meant the separation of the laity from the mystery of the Eucharist. The upkeep and ...
Found on http://www.mdlp.co.uk/genweb/glossary.htm

Chancel

the area of the church which includes the altar. Often (as in our church) this is also where the choir sits when there is one. It is sometimes separated from the rest of the church by a screen or, as in our church by a rail which is referred to as an altar rail.
Found on http://www.fouroaksmethodist.org.uk/16.html

Chancel

The chancel is the eastern portion of a church, reserved for the clergy and the choir, and often separated from the main body of the church by a screen or by steps. It is the area from which the service is conducted, as distinct from the nave, where the congregation sits. The chancel is usually an elevated platform, usually three steps up from the ...
Found on http://www.virtualani.org/glossary/index.htm

Chancel

the eastern end of a church.
Found on http://www.britainexpress.com/History/medieval/church-glossary.htm

chancel

the eastern space in a church where the high altar is usually found
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20559

Chancel

The part of a church in which the altar or communion table is set. It should, in a Church of Scotland, also accommodate the font, and usually the pulpit. It is sometimes a separate chamber at the east end of the building, but is commonly simply an area at the east end of a rectangular worship space. Related Words: East end (liturgical) (and north, ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20938

Chancel

The part of the church at the east end, where the altar stands and where the clergy sit.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20941

Chancel

The part of the church at the east end, where the altar stands and where the clergy sit.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22200

Chancel

The space surrounding the altar of a church.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20018

Chancel

The space surrounding the altar of a church.
Found on http://www.castlesontheweb.com/glossary.html

Chancel

This is the area in the church set apart for the priest saying mass. It is where the altar stands. In most churches it is to the west of the nave.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766
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