Ward

[castle] In fortifications, a bailey or ward refers to a courtyard enclosed by a curtain wall. In particular, an early type of European castle was known as a Motte-and-bailey. Castles can have more than one ward. Their layout depends both on the local topography and the level of fortification technology employed, ranging from simple enclosu...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_(castle)

Ward

[Vietnam] A ward (phường) in Vietnam is an urban subdistrict. It is one of three kinds of third-level commune-level subdivisions along with the commune-level town (thị trấn), and the rural commune (xã). The ward is subordinates to the second-level units including county-level town or the provincial city or the urban district of cent...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_(Vietnam)

Ward

Every local authority in the country is divided into a number of smaller districts known as wards - there are 8,414 in England alone. They form the constituencies for local elections, returning up to three councillors each. The government is also focusing much of its regeneration work on wards which are compact enough to allow money to be targeted ...
Found on http://society.guardian.co.uk/glossary/page/0,,646470,00.html

ward

[n] - English economist and conservationist (1914-1981) 2. [n] - English writer of novels who was an active opponent of the women`s suffrage movement (1851-1920) 3. [n] - United States businessman who in 1872 established a successful mail-order business (1843-1913) 4. [n] - a person who is under the protection or in the custody o...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=ward

Ward

a castle courtyard or bailey
Found on http://www.castlexplorer.co.uk/glossary.php

ward

Electoral division of a parliamentary seat or of a district council in an urban area. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Ward

(of castle) An area of land within a castle or a castle's jurisdiction. Sometimes the baileys of a castle called be called separate wards. The can be portions of land at some distance to the main holding's of the magnate - but still included as part of a ward. For example, 'Bedlingtonshire' was treated as part of Chester-le-Street ward (see Norhams...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Ward

Ward noun [ Anglo-Saxon weard , fem., guard, weard , masc., keeper, guard; akin to Old Saxon ward a watcher, warden, German wart , Old High German wart , Icelandic vörðr a warden, a watch, Goth. -wards in daúra wards a doorkeeper, and English...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/7

Ward

Ward transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Warded ; present participle & verbal noun Warding .] [ Middle English wardien , Anglo-Saxon weardian to keep, protect; akin to Old Saxon ward...n to watch, take care...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/7

Ward

Ward intransitive verb 1. To be vigilant; to keep guard. 2. To act on the defensive with a weapon. « She redoubling her blows drove the stranger to no other shift than to ward and go back.» Sir P. Sidney.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/7

ward

1. The act of guarding; watch; guard; guardianship; specifically, a guarding during the day. See the Note under Watch. 'Still, when she slept, he kept both watch and ward.' (Spenser) ... 2. One who, or that which, guards; garrison; defender; protector; means of guarding; defense; protection. 'For the best ward of mine honor.' (Shak) 'The assieged c...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

ward

hospital ward noun block forming a division of a hospital (or a suite of rooms) shared by patients who need a similar kind of care; `they put her in a 4-bed ward`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=ward

Ward

Aaron Montgomery Ward noun United States businessman who in 1872 established a successful mail-order business (1843-1913)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=Ward

ward

(word) a large room in a hospital for the accommodation of several patients. a division within a hospital for the care of numerous patients having the same condition, such as a a maternity ward.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Ward

• (n.) A division of a county. • (n.) To fend off; to repel; to turn aside, as anything mischievous that approaches; -- usually followed by off. • (v. i.) To act on the defensive with a weapon. • (n.) To defend by walls, fortifications, etc. • (n.) The state of being under guard or guardianship; confinement under guard; the...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/ward/

ward

(from the article `lock`) ...security. The Romans introduced metal for locks, usually iron for the lock itself and often bronze for the key (with the result that keys are ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/w/9

Ward

The USS Ward was an American flush deck type destroyer of 1060 tons displacement launched in 1918. The USS Ward was powered by four Normand oil-burning boilers providing a top speed of 35 knots. She carried a complement of 122 and was armed with four 4 inch guns; one 3 inch anti-aircraft gun and twelve 21 inch torpedo tubes arranged in four triple ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RW.HTM

Ward

[South Africa] In South Africa, wards are geopolitical subdivisions of municipalities used for electoral purposes. Each metropolitan and local municipality is delimited by the Municipal Demarcation Board into half as many wards as there are seats on the municipal council (rounding up if there are an odd number of seats). Each ward then elec...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_(South_Africa)

ward

courtyard enclosure of a castle. More confined version of a bailey with a stone wall
Found on http://www.castles-of-britain.com/glossary.htm

Ward

A person for whom a guardianship and/or conservatorship is established. An infant placed by authority of law under the care of a guardian.While under the care of a guardian a ward can make no contract whatever binding upon him, except for necessaries. When the relation of guardian and ward ceases, the latter is entitled to have an account of the .....
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/w005.htm

Ward

(n) A ward is an individual who's responsibility is assigned to another person by a court of law for proper upkeep and care. Generally this is the term used to represent kids, who are not properly maintained by their parents or those who are diverted to crime and illegal activities, ordered by the court to be lived under a guardian appointed by the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

ward

n. 1) a person (usually a minor) who has a guardian appointed by the court to care for and take responsibility for that person. A governmental agency may take temporary custody of a minor for his/her protection and care if the child is suffering from parental neglect or abuse, or has been in trouble with the law. Such a child is a "ward of the cour...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=2235

Ward

Type: Term Pronunciation: wōrd Definitions: 1. Owen C., 20th-century pediatrician. See: Romano-Ward syndrome
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=99570

ward

minor under the control of a guardian
Found on http://charlesdickenspage.com/glossary.html

Ward

[electoral subdivision] A ward is a subdivision of a local authority area, typically used for electoral purposes. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods, thoroughfares, parishes, landmarks, geographical features and in some cases historical figures connected to the area. It is common in the United States for wards to simply be numbere...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ward_(electoral_subdivision)
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