Snag

A dead tree in a river. Capable of sinking a canoe.
Found on http://www.xmission.com/~drudy/amm/gloss.html

snag

[v] - get by acting quickly and smartly 2. [v] - catch on a snag 3. [v] - hew jaggedly
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=snag

Snag

Defect.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20698

SNAG

Student Nurses' Association of Guam
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20895

Snag

Snag noun [ Prov. E., noun , a lump on a tree where a branch has been cut off; v., to cut off the twigs and small branches from a tree, of Celtic origin; confer Gael. snaigh , snaidh , to cut down, to prune, to sharpen, past participle snaighte , snaidhte , cut off, lopped, I...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/130

Snag

Snag transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Snagged ; present participle & verbal noun Snagging .] 1. To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly. [ Prov. Eng.] Halliwell. 2. To...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/130

snag

1. To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly. ... 2. To injure or destroy, as a steamboat or other vessel, by a snag, or projecting part of a sunken tree. 3. To catch on a snag5. 4. (Fig) To obtain by a quick action, as though by snagging3 something passing by; often used of an opportunistic or fortunate action. ... O...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

snag

noun a dead tree that is still standing, usually in an undisturbed forest; `a snag can provide food and a habitat for insects and birds`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=snag

snag

noun a sharp protuberance
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=snag

Snag

• (v. t.) To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly. • (n.) A stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch; a knot; a protuberance. • (v. t.) To injure or destroy, as a steamboat or other vessel, by a snag, or projecting part of a sunken tree. • (n....
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/snag/

Snag

(from the article `Canada`) ...from open water are the coldest, so that in the interior plains and in the North the winters are extremely cold. The lowest temperature ever ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/114

Snag

[textiles] In textiles, a snag is created when a sharp or rough object pulls, plucks, scratches, or drags a group of fibres, yarn, or a yarn segment from its normal pattern. Snags can be classified into three types: Objects that often cause snags are rough fingernails or toenails, or hangnails. When a snag occurs in certain fine textiles li...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snag_(textiles)

Snag

Snag is Dorset slang for sloe.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZSC.HTM

Snag

Snag is Dorset slang for sloe.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZSC.HTM

SNAG

Sensitive New Age Guy
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21662

Snag

[ecology] In forest ecology, a snag refers to a standing, dead or dying tree, often missing a top or most of the smaller branches. In freshwater ecology it refers to trees, branches, and other pieces of naturally occurring wood found sunken in rivers and streams; it is also known as coarse woody debris. When used in manufacturing, especiall...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snag_(ecology)

Snag

Any standing dead, partially dead, or defective (cull) tree at least 10 inches in diameter at breast height and at least 6 feet tall.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21804

Snag

A dead standing tree that can be hazardous.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_wildfire_terms

Snag

a standing dead tree. Many primary cavity nesters build nest holes or roosts in snags, which are often reused by secondary cavity nesters. More info.
Found on http://www.sialis.org/glossary.htm

Snag

A standing partly, or completely dead tree.
Found on http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/glossary/

snag

a dead tree that is still standing. Snags provide important food and cover for a wide variety of wildlife species.
Found on http://www.dnr.state.md.us/forests/gloss.html

Snag

rocky or uneven bed that can snare your hook and line
Found on http://www.fish-uk.com/dictionary.htm

snag

hitting a snag is when your lure or hooks get caught on submerged material such as weeds or branches. A snaggy area of water is one where there are many of these hazards. Snags are the main reason that lures get lost.
Found on http://www.plugsandspinners.com/p/blog-page_9.html
No exact match found