hole

  1. an opening into or through something
  2. an opening deliberately made in or through something
  3. one playing period (from tee to green) on a golf course
  4. an unoccupied space
  5. a fault
  6. informal terms for a difficult situation
  7. informal terms for the mouth

Hole

Hole is slang for the anus.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZH.HTM

Hole

Hole is slang for the anus.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZH.HTM

hole

[n] - a fault 2. [n] - an unoccupied space 3. [n] - a depression hollowed out of solid matter 4. [n] - an opening into or through something 5. [n] - one playing period (from tee to green) on a golf course 6. [n] - an opening deliberately made in or through something 7. [v] - in golf: hit the ball into the hole 8. [v]
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=hole

Hole

Particle associated with an empty electron level in an almost filled band.For semi-conductors and insulators, a vacant electron state in the valence band that behaves as a positive charge carrier in an electric field.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/h/o/hole/source.html

Hole

Hole (hōl) adjective Whole. [ Obsolete] Chaucer.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

Hole

Hole noun [ Middle English hol , hole , Anglo-Saxon hol , hole, cavern, from hol , adjective , hollow ; akin to Dutch hol , Old High German hol , German hohl , Danish huul hollow, hul hole, Swedish hål , Icelandic...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

Hole

Hole transitive verb [ Anglo-Saxon holian . See Hole , noun ] 1. To cut, dig, or bore a hole or holes in; as, to hole a post for the insertion of rails or bars. Chapman. 2. To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

Hole

Hole intransitive verb To go or get into a hole. B. Jonson.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

Hole

Hole noun (Games) (a) A small cavity used in some games, usually one into which a marble or ball is to be played or driven; hence, a score made by playing a marble or ball into such a hole, as in golf. (b) (Fives) At Eton College, England, that part of the floor of the court...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/53

hole

1. A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure. 'The holes where eyes should be.' (Shak) 'The blind walls Were full of chinks and holes.' (Tennyson) 'The priest took a chest, and bored a hole in the lid.' (2 Kings xii. 9) ... 2. An excavation in the ground, ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

hole

noun an opening deliberately made in or through something
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hole

hole

verb make holes in
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hole

hole

noun one playing period (from tee to green) on a golf course; `he played 18 holes`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hole

hole

noun a depression hollowed out of solid matter
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hole

hole

verb hit the ball into the hole
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=hole

Hole

• (n.) A hollow place or cavity; an excavation; a pit; an opening in or through a solid body, a fabric, etc.; a perforation; a rent; a fissure. • (a.) Whole. • (n.) To drive into a hole, as an animal, or a billiard ball. • (n.) An excavation in the ground, made by an animal to live in, or a natural cavity inhabited by an animal;...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/hole/

hole

(from the article `Cosmos`) ...groups have carried out such a program, some in fairly restricted areas of the sky and others over larger regions but to shallower depths. A ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/61

hole

(from the article `chess`) ...with knights, paid dividends in the middlegame if the centre was closed. (See Game 6.) He originated the term `hole` to mean a vulnerable square ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/61

Hole

(from the article `Love, Courtney`) In 1989 Love formed Hole with the guitarist Eric Erlandson (b. Jan. 9, 1963, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.), the bassist Jill Emery (b. 1962), and the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/61

hole

in solid-state physics, the name given to a missing electron in certain metals and semiconductors. A missing electron is the same as an added ... [14 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/61

Hole

The vacancy where an electron would normally exist in a solid; behaves like a positively charged particle.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21690

Hole

[surname] Hole is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hole_(surname)

Hole

[quasiparticle] ===User:Oxyman42=== Oxyman42 was blocked over a dispute with me elsewhere, and never realy showed he understood why socking is not allowed (see unbock requests and the subsequent block of Oxyman). Obviously all users have similar names. The new account Oxyman24 has recently registered a contrary opinion contrary to mine on a...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hole_(quasiparticle)

hole

vacancy appearing in an almost filled energy band, behaving like a carrier of one positive elementary charge
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=111-14-42
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