Channel

A communication path for transmission of data between two points.

channel

  1. a path over which electrical signals can pass
  2. a passage for water (or other fluids)
  3. a long narrow furrow cut either by a natural process (such as erosion) or by a tool (as e.g. a groove in a phonograph record)
  4. a relatively narrow body of water linking two larger bodies
  5. (often plural) a means of communication or access
  6. a bodily passage or tube conveying a secretion or other s......

    Channel

    (1) A natural or artificial waterway of perceptible extent which either periodically or continuously contains moving water, or which forms a connecting link between two bodies of water. (2) The part of a body of water deep enough to be used for navigation through an area otherwise too shallow for navigation. (3) The deepest portion of a stream, BAY...
    Found on http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/sea/swces/products/glossary.htm

    Channel

    (Canelle ) To create small V-shaped grooves over the surface of fruits or vegetables for decorative purposes using a canelle knife. The fruit or vegetable is then sliced, creating a decorative border on the slices.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22282

    channel

    (chanĀ“әl) a passage, cut, or groove through which something can pass or flow across a solid structure.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

    channel

    (from the article `communication`) ...is neither the only model of the communication process extant nor is it universally accepted. As originally conceived, the model contained five ... [8 related articles]
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/54

    channel

    (from the article `electronics`) ...holes and attracts electrons from the -type region, in which there are some electrons even though the principal charge carriers are holes. The ...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/54

    channel

    [n] - a deep and relatively narrow body of water (as in a river or a harbor or a strait linking two larger bodies) that allows the best passage for vessels 2. [n] - (often plural) a means of communication or access 3. [n] - a path over which electrical signals can pass 4. [n] - a television station and its programs 5. [n] - a...
    Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=channel

    Channel

    • (v. t.) To form a channel in; to cut or wear a channel or channels in; to groove. • (v. t.) To course through or over, as in a channel. • (n.) A strait, or narrow sea, between two portions of lands; as, the British Channel. • (n.) Flat ledges of heavy plank bolted edgewise to the outside of a vessel, to increase the spread of ...
    Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/channel/

    channel

    TV channel noun a television station and its programs; `a satellite TV channel`; `surfing through the channels`; `they offer more than one hundred channels`
    Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=channel

    channel

    transmission channel noun a path over which electrical signals can pass; `a channel is typically what you rent from a telephone company`
    Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=channel

    Channel

    [association football] In association football, channels is the name given to certain areas of the pitch, created by the space between players and groups of players. There are two types of channels, vertical (between full backs and their closest centre back), and horizontal (between defence,midfield and attack). ==Vertical channels== The ch...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_(association_football)

    Channel

    [broadcasting] In broadcasting, a channel is a range of frequencies (or, equivalently, wavelengths) assigned by a government for the operation of a particular radio station, television station or television channel. In common usage, the term also may be used to refer to the station operating on a particular frequency. ...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_(broadcasting)

    Channel

    [communications] In telecommunications and computer networking, a communication channel or channel, refers either to a physical transmission medium such as a wire, or to a logical connection over a multiplexed medium such as a radio channel. A channel is used to convey an information signal, for example a digital bit stream, from one or sev...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_(communications)

    Channel

    [digital image] Color digital images are made of pixels, and pixels are made of combinations of primary colors. A channel in this context is the grayscale image of the same size as a color image, made of just one of these primary colors. For instance, an image from a standard digital camera will have a red, green and blue channel. A graysca...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_(digital_image)

    Channel

    [geography] In physical geography, a channel is a type of landform consisting of the outline of a path of relatively shallow and narrow body of fluid, most commonly the confine of a river, river delta or strait. Channels can be either natural or human-made. A channel is typically outlined in terms of its bed and banks. ==Natural channels== ...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_(geography)

    Channel

    [programming] In computing, a channel is a model for interprocess communication and synchronization via message passing. A message may be sent over a channel, and another process or thread is able to synchronously receive messages sent over a channel it has a reference to, as a stream. Channels are fundamental to the process calculus approa...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_(programming)

    Channel

    Chan'nel (chăn'nĕl) noun [ Middle English chanel , canel , Old French chanel , French chenel , from Latin canalis . See Canal .] 1. The hollow bed where a stream of water runs or may run. 2. The deeper part of a river, harbor, st...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/53

    Channel

    Chan'nel transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Channeled , or Channelled ; present participle & verbal noun Channeling , or Channelling .] 1. To form a channel in; to cut or wear a channel or channels in; to...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/53

    Channel

    1. A communication path. Multiple channels can be multiplexed over a single cable in certain environments. 2. In IBM, the specific path between large computers (such as mainframes) and attached peripheral devices.
    Found on http://www.wildpackets.com/resources/compendium/glossary_of_networking_term

    Channel

    1) In multitrack tape machines, this term means the same thing as the term Track (one audio recording made on a portion of the width of a multitrack tape).
    2) A single path that an audio signal travels or can travel through a device from an input to an output.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

    Channel

    A 6 mhz (bandwidth) section of broadcasting spectrum allocated for one analog NTSC transmission.
    Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Television_%28TV%29/

    Channel

    A channel in computing is a specific bandwidth and frequency combination.
    Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Computers/

    Channel

    A channel is a path for passing data or digital audio. In sequencing, each channel is assigned to a single instrument in any particular instant of time and in General MIDI, channel 10 is reserved for a percussion voice. One MIDI port makes 16 MIDI channels available so one song could have 16 different channels/instruments assigned to one MIDI p...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20532

    Channel

    A channel is a path for passing data or digital audio. In sequencing, each channel is assigned to a single instrument in any particular instant of time and in General MIDI, channel 10 is reserved for a percussion voice. One MIDI port makes 16 MIDI channels available so one song could have 16 different channels/instruments assigned to one MIDI port....
    Found on http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/music%20tech%20glossary/Music%20Tech%20Gl
    No exact match found