Shock

A severe condition that disturbs the body. A person with diabetes can go into shock when the level of blood glucose (sugar) drops suddenly. See also: Insulin shock.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_diabetes

Shock

• (v. t.) To subject to the action of an electrical discharge so as to cause a more or less violent depression or commotion of the nervous system. • (a.) Bushy; shaggy; as, a shock hair. • (v.) To strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust; to cause to recoil; as, his violence shocked his associates. • (n.) A dog with long...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/shock/

shock

(shok) a sudden disturbance of mental equilibrium. a condition of acute peripheral circulatory failure due to derangement of circulatory control or loss of circulating fluid. It is marked by hypotension and coldness of the skin, and often by tachycardia and anxiety. The five main types of shock are anaphyl...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

shock

1. <psychiatry> A sudden disturbance of mental equilibrium. ... 2. <cardiology> A condition of profound haemodynamic and metabolic disturbance characterised by failure of the circulatory system to maintain adequate perfusion of vital organs, it may result from inadequate blood volume (hypovolaemic shock), inadequate cardiac function (ca...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

shock

1. a sudden disturbance of mental equilibrium. 2. a condition of profound haemodynamic and metabolic disturbance characterized by failure of the circulatory system to maintain adequate perfusion of vital organs; it may result from inadequate blood volume (hypovolaemic shock); inadequate cardiac function (cardiogenic shock), or inadequate vasomotor....
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio80.html

Shock

1. An unexpected change. 2. Any change in an exogenous variable (although strictly speaking, models often fail to deal adequately with the complications of an exogenous change being expected).
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/s.html

shock

floor verb surprise greatly; knock someone`s socks off; `I was floored when I heard that I was promoted`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

shock

seismic disturbance noun an instance of agitation of the earth`s crust; `the first shock of the earthquake came shortly after noon while workers were at lunch`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Shock

[circulatory] Circulatory shock, commonly known simply as shock, is a life-threatening medical condition that occurs due to inadequate substrate for aerobic cellular respiration. In the early stages, this is generally an inadequate tissue level of oxygen. The typical signs of shock are low blood pressure, a rapid heartbeat and signs of poor...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(circulatory)

Shock

[economics] In economics, a shock is an unexpected or unpredictable event that affects an economy, either positively or negatively. Technically, it refers to an unpredictable change in exogenous factors—that is, factors unexplained by economics—which may have an impact on endogenous economic variables. The response of economic variables...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(economics)

Shock

[fluid dynamics] Where, the index 1 refers to upstream properties, and the index 2 refers to down stream properties. The subscript 0 refers to total or stagnation properties. T is temperature, M is the mach number, P is pressure, ρ is density, and γ is the ratio of specific heats. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(fluid_dynamics)

Shock

[journal] Shock: Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis: Laboratory and Clinical Approaches (ISSN:1073-2322) is the official journal of the Shock Society, the European Shock Society, the Indonesian Shock Society, the International Federation of Shock Societies, and the Official and International Journal of the Japan Shock Society. The journal pub...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(journal)

Shock

[mechanics] A mechanical or physical shock is a sudden acceleration or deceleration caused, for example, by impact, drop, kick, earthquake, or explosion. Shock is a transient physical excitation. Shock is a term for extreme forces that matter is subjected to. A shock is usually measured as acceleration vs time. A shock can be characterised ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(mechanics)

Shock

[musical] Shock (stylized as SHOCK) is a Japanese musical series. The producer of the show is Johnny Kitagawa, head of the talent agency Johnny & Associates. In charge of the production is Koichi Domoto, a member of the Japanese duo KinKi Kids. Starting out in 2000, Shock has been performed annually ever since. As of March 2009, it has been...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(musical)

Shock

[physiological] This category includes wheelchair fencers at the 2000 Summer Paralympics in Sydney, Australia. == See also == ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(physiological)

Shock

[troupe] Shock is a music/mime/dance/pop group that was notable in the early 1980s for supporting English new wave groups such as Gary Numan, Adam and the Ants, Depeche Mode and Famous Names, led by Steve Fairnie. In 1979, mime artists Tim Dry and Barbie Wilde united with dancers Robert Pereno, LA Richards and Karen Sparks to produce Shock....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(troupe)

Shock

[Unmei] ==Track list== ==Charts== ===Oricon Sales Charts=== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(Unmei)

Shock

Shock adjective Bushy; shaggy; as, a shock hair. « His red shock peruke . . . was laid aside.» Sir W. Scott.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/90

Shock

Shock intransitive verb To be occupied with making shocks. « Reap well, scatter not, gather clean that is shorn, Bind fast, shock apace.» Tusser.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/90

Shock

Shock noun [ Middle English schokke ; confer OD schocke , German schock a heap, quantity, threescore, Middle High German schoc , Swedish skok , and also German hocke a heap of hay, Lithuanian kugis .] 1. A pile or assemblage of sheaves of grai...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/90

Shock

Shock transitive verb To collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook; as, to shock rye.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/90

shock

a circulatory disturbance marked by a severe drop in blood pressure, rapid pulse, clammy skin, pallor, and a rapid heart rate
Found on http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~kemmer/Words04/usage/jargon_medical.html

Shock

A condition in which body function is impaired because the volume of fluid circulating through the body is insufficient to maintain normal metabolism. This may be caused by blood loss or by a disturbance in the function of the circulatory system.
Found on https://www.texasheart.org/heart-health/heart-information-center/topics/a-z

Shock

A generally temporary massive physiological reaction to severe physical or emotional trauma, usually characterized by marked loss of blood pressure and depression of vital processes.
Found on http://www.apluspetgoods.com/petsupplies/dog-glossary.php

Shock

A physical state often caused by severe injury, and characterized by depressed physical response (blood pressure, heart rate, etc.).
Found on http://www.moggies.co.uk/gloss.html
No exact match found