psittacosis

  1. infectious disease of birds
  2. an atypical pneumonia caused by a rickettsia microorganism and transmitted to humans from infected birds

Psittacosis

In medicine (pulmonology), psittacosis — also known as parrot fever, and ornithosis — is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Chlamydophila psittaci (formerly Chlamydia psittaci) and contracted from parrots, such as macaws, cockatiels and budgerigars, and pigeons, sparrows, ducks, hens, gulls and many other species of bir...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psittacosis

psittacosis

(sit″ә-ko´sis) a disease with respiratory and systemic symptoms caused by infection with Chlamydia psittaci. It was seen first in parrots and later in other wild and domestic birds (in which it is called ornithosis); it is transmissible to humans having contact with infected birds, their droppings, or contaminated...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

psittacosis

[n] - infectious disease of birds 2. [n] - an atypical pneumonia caused by a rickettsia microorganism and transmitted to humans from infected birds
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=psittacosis

psittacosis

<chest medicine, disease> Psittacosis is primarily an infectious disease of birds caused by the bacterium Chlamydia psittaci. Transmission from infected birds results in a relatively rare febrile illness characterised by pneumonia and systemic symptoms. A flu-like illness can also occur. Almost any bird can harbor this bacterium in their excr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

psittacosis

ornithosis noun an atypical pneumonia caused by a rickettsia microorganism and transmitted to humans from infected birds
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

psittacosis

parrot disease noun infectious disease of birds
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Psittacosis

a chlamydial infection resembling influenza that is spread to humans by the droppings of infected birds
Found on http://www.medichecks.com/glossary.cfm?ltr=P

Psittacosis

A reportable disease of the zoonose type brought on by exposure to infected droppings, dust or feathers and infected tissues in birds. Exposure can cause respiratory infection.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

Psittacosis

also known as parrot disease, parrot fever, and ornithosis, an infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Chlamydophila psittaci that can be contracted from parrots, macaws, cockatiels and parakeets, pigeons, sparrows, ducks, chickens, etc. After an incubation period of 5-14 days, symptoms can mimic severe atypical pneumonia with flu-like symp...
Found on http://www.sialis.org/glossary.htm

psittacosis

infectious disease of worldwide distribution caused by a bacterial parasite (Chlamydia psittaci) and transmitted to humans from various birds. The ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/127

psittacosis

psittacosis (situkō'sis) or parrot fever,infectious disease caused by the species of Chlamydia psittaci and transmitted to people by birds, particularly parrots, parakeets, and lovebirds. In birds the disease takes the form of an intestinal infection, but in people the illness runs the cou...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0840383.html

psittacosis

psittacosis 1. An infectious disease of parrots. 2. An acute or chronic respiratory and systemic disease of wild and domestic birds, caused by infection with Chlamydia psittaci. It was originally seen in psittacine birds and is transmissible to humans and other animals; also known as, chlamydiosis. 3. Human infection by C. psittaci, generally ac...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1775/

psittacosis

Type: Term Pronunciation: sit′ă-kō′sis Definitions: 1. An infectious disease in psittacine birds and humans caused by the bacterium Chlamydophila psittaci (formerly Chlamydia psittaci). Avian infections are mainly inapparent or latent, although acute disease does occur; human infections may result in mild disease with a flulik...
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=73544
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