oblige

[v] - provide a service or favor for someone 2. [v] - bind by an obligation
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=oblige

Oblige

O·blige' transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Obliged ; present participle & verbal noun Obliging .] [ Old French obligier , French obliger , Latin obligare ; ob (see Ob- ) + ligare ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/O/3

oblige

1. To attach, as by a bond. 'He had obliged all the senators and magistrates firmly to himself.' (Bacon) ... 2. To constrain by physical, moral, or legal force; to put under obligation to do or forbear something. 'The obliging power of the law is neither founded in, nor to be measured by, the rewards and punishments annexed to it.' (South) 'Religio...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

oblige

verb provide a service or favor for someone; `We had to oblige him`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Oblige

• (v. t.) To bind by some favor rendered; to place under a debt; hence, to do a favor to; to please; to gratify; to accommodate. • (v. t.) To attach, as by a bond. • (v. t.) To constrain by physical, moral, or legal force; to put under obligation to do or forbear something.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/oblige/

oblige

oblige 1. To require or constrain, as by law, command, conscience, or force of necessity. 2. To bind morally or legally, as by a promise or contract. 3. To place under a debt of gratitude for some benefit, favor, or service. 4. Etymology: 'to bind by oath', from Old French obligier, from Latin obligare, from ob-, 'to' + ligare, 'to bind'. Main mod...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3416/
No exact match found