gland

a device used to form a seal around a reciprocating or rotating rod (as in a pump) to prevent fluid leakage. Specifically, the movable part of a stuffing box by which the packing is compressed.

Gland

A gland is an organ in an animal`s body that synthesizes a substance such as hormones for release into the bloodstream (endocrine gland) or into cavities inside the body or its outer surface (exocrine gland). ==Structure== Glands are organs in that synthesizes a substance such as hormones for release into the bloodstream (endocrine gland) or into....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gland

Gland

a tissue which produces a product used elsewhere. The pancreas is a large gland, and a complex one. It produces considerable quantities of bile acids for use in the intestines; these are carried to the intestines via ducts and so the pancreas is a ducted gland. Parts of the pancreas (chiefly the Islets of Langerhans) produce very small amounts ......
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_diabetes

Gland

• (n.) An organ or part which resembles a secreting, or true, gland, as the ductless, lymphatic, pineal, and pituitary glands, the functions of which are very imperfectly known. • (n.) The movable part of a stuffing box by which the packing is compressed; -- sometimes called a follower. See Illust. of Stuffing box, under Stuffing. • ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/gland/

gland

<anatomy> Organ specialised for secretion by the infolding of an epithelial sheet. ... The secretory epithelial cells may either be arranged as an acinus with a duct or as a tubule. Glands from which release occurs to a free epithelial surface are exocrine, those that release product to the circulatory system are endocrine glands. ... (17 Dec...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

gland

(gland) an aggregation of cells specialized to secrete or excrete materials not related to their ordinary metabolic needs. Glands are divided into two main groups, the endocrine glands and the exocrine glands. adj., glan´dular., adj.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Gland

1. A group of cells that secrete a substance for use in the body. For example, the thyroid gland. 2. A group of cells that removes materials from the circulation. For example, a lymph gland.
Found on http://www.emedicinehealth.com/allergy_insect_sting/glossary_em.htm

Gland

1. A group of cells that secrete a substance for use in the body. For example, the thyroid gland. 2.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22410

gland

secretory organ noun any of various organs that synthesize substances needed by the body and release it through ducts or directly into the bloodstream
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Gland

[botany] In plants, a gland is defined functionally as a plant structure which secretes one or more products. This may be located on or near the plant surface and secrete externally, or be internal to the plant and secrete into a canal or reservoir. Examples include glandular hairs, nectaries, hydathodes, and the resin canals in Pinus. == N...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gland_(botany)

Gland

[Vaud] The Republic of Latvia (Latvian: Latvijas Republika) is a country in Northern Europe. Latvia has land borders with its two fellow Baltic states—Estonia to the north and—Lithuania to the south, with Russia and Belarus to the east. In the west, Latvia shares a maritime border with Sweden. The capital of Latvia, Riga (Latvian: Rīga...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gland_(Vaud)

Gland

Gland noun [ French glande , Latin glans , glandis , acorn; akin to Greek ... for ..., and ... to cast, throw, the acorn being the dropped fruit. Confer Parable , noun ] 1. (Anat.) (a) An organ for secreting something to be us...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/30

Gland

A cell or group of cells in the skin that releases a liquid substance.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20085

Gland

A cell or group of cells in the skin that releases a liquid substance.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21498

Gland

a depression or protuberance that exists for the purpose of secreting
Found on http://www.calflora.net/botanicalnames/botanicalterms.html

Gland

A fitting used to prevent leakage at a rotating shaft.
Found on http://www.dyerlabs.com/glossary/microbiology/2w-x-y-z.html

Gland

A gland is a bodily organ that manufactures and secretes enzymes, hormones or other chemicals.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/EG.HTM

Gland

a group of cells or an organ that produces substances (such as hormones and enzyme) that are used by the body
Found on http://www.medichecks.com/glossary.cfm?ltr=G

gland

a group of cells that secrete substances. Endocrine glands secrete hormones. Exocrine glands secrete salt, enzymes, and water.
Found on http://www.diabetes.co.uk/glossary/g.html

gland

a group of cells that secrete substances. Endocrine glands secrete hormones. Exocrine glands secrete salt, enzymes and water.
Found on http://www.diabetes.org

gland

A secreting surface or structure; loosely used for any protuberance or appendage having the appearence of such an organ, such as calli.
Found on http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/cd-keys/orchidkey/html/glossary.html

gland

a secretory structure within or on the surface of a plant; (loosely) a smooth, usually shining, bead-like outgrowth.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_botanical_terms

gland

a secretory structure, e.g. a nectary, extra-floral nectary or a gland tipped, hair-like or wart-like organ. adj. glandular. cf. eglandular
Found on http://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/help/glossary

Gland

A structure secreting substances, eg. oils.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20637

gland

An organ (sometimes a single cell) the main function of which is to build up one or more specific chemical compounds, called secretions, that are passed to the outside of the gland. Most glands in animals are of the exocrine type. Exocrine glands discharge their secretions through a tube or duct on ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/G/gland.html
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