Cynic

• (n.) One of a sect or school of philosophers founded by Antisthenes, and of whom Diogenes was a disciple. The first Cynics were noted for austere lives and their scorn for social customs and current philosophical opinions. Hence the term Cynic symbolized, in the popular judgment, moroseness, and contempt for the views of others. • (n.) ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/cynic/

cynic

faultfinder noun someone who is critical of the motives of others
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Cynic

Cyn'ic (sĭn'ĭk), Cyn'ic*al (-ĭ*k a l) adjective [ Latin cynicus of the sect of Cynics, from Greek kyniko`s , prop., dog- like, from ky`wn , kyno`s , dog. See Hound .] 1. Having the qualities of a surly dog; snarl...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/211

Cynic

Cyn'ic noun (Gr. Philos) 1. One of a sect or school of philosophers founded by Antisthenes, and of whom Diogenes was a disciple. The first Cynics were noted for austere lives and their scorn for social customs and current philosophical opinions. Hence the term Cynic symbolized, in the popul...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/211

cynic

cynic 1. A person who believes all people are motivated by selfishness. 2. A person whose outlook is scornfully and often habitually negative. A Cynic was an ancient Greek philosopher or a member of a group of ancient Greek philosophers who believed that virtue is the only good and that the only means of achieving it was through self-control. The...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2986/

Cynic

Cynic, Cynics A member of a sect of ancient Greek philosophers who believed virtue to be the only good and self-control to be the only means of achieving virtue. The Greek word kunikos, from which 'cynic' comes, was originally an adjective meaning 'doglike', from kuōn, 'dog'. The word was probably applied to the Cynic philosophers because of...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/605/

cynic

Doglike, denoting a spasm of the muscles of the face as in risus caninus. ... Origin: G. Kynikos, doglike ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

cynic

Member of a school of Greek philosophy (cynicism), founded in Athens about 400 BC by Antisthenes, a disciple of Socrates, who advocated a stern and simple morality and a complete disregard of...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

cynic

Member of a school of Greek philosophy (cynicism), founded in Athens about 400 BC by Antisthenes, a disciple of Socrates, who advocated a stern and simple morality and a complete disregard of pleasure and comfort. His followers, led by Diogenes, not only showed a contemptuous disregard for pleasure, but despised all human affection as a source of w...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0017267.html

Cynic

to well into Christian times and was distinguished more for its unconventional way of life than for any system of thought. Antisthenes, a disciple ... [8 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/175

cynic

[n] - someone who is critical of the motives of others
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=cynic
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