Convection

A method of transferring heat by the actual movement of heated molecules, usually by a freestanding unit such as a furnace.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Convection

Convection is the concerted, collective movement of groups or aggregates of molecules within fluids (e.g., liquids, gases) and rheids, either through advection or through diffusion or as a combination of both of them. Convection of mass cannot take place in solids, since neither bulk current flows nor significant diffusion can take place in solids...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convection

convection

The mechanism for transfer of heat from a solid surface (such as a component) to a surrounding fluid (usually air). Natural convection is heat transfer to ‘still` air; forced convection involves heat transfer to air that is moved by artificial means such as a fan.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870

Convection

• (n.) The act or process of conveying or transmitting. • (n.) A process of transfer or transmission, as of heat or electricity, by means of currents in liquids or gases, resulting from changes of temperature and other causes.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/convection/

convection

(kәn-vek´shәn) the act of conveying or transmission; specifically, transmission of heat in a liquid or gas by the bulk movement of heated particles to a cooler area. See also convection current.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Convection

- Currents created by heating air, which then rises and pulls cooler air behind it. Also see radiation.
Found on http://www.homebuildingmanual.com/Glossary.htm

Convection

1. The circulatory motion that occurs in a fluid at a non-uniform temperature owing to the variation of its density and the action of gravity. 2. The transfer of heat by this automatic circulation of fluid.
Found on http://www.flowmeterdirectory.com/flowmeter_technical_glossary/flowmeter_te

Convection

Con·vec'tion noun [ Latin convectio , from convehere to bring together; con- + vehere to carry.] 1. The act or process of conveying or transmitting. 2. (Physics) A process of transfer or transmission, as of heat or electricity, by means of currents...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/152

convection

A method of transferring heat by the actual movement of heated molecules, usually by a freestanding unit such as a furnace.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21074

Convection

A natural circulation of fluid. The hot fluid (lighter) rises and the cool fluid (heavier) sinks.
Found on http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/Charts/Glossary-html/Glossary_C.html

convection

An atmospheric motion which is predominately vertical. Warm air rising or cold air sinking or both.
Found on http://www.stormfax.com/wxwords.htm

convection

An atmospheric motion which is predominately vertical. Warm air rising or cold air sinking or both.
Found on http://www.stormfax.com/wxwords.htm

Convection

Atmospheric motions that are predominantly vertical, resulting in vertical transport and mixing of atmospheric properties; distinguished from advection.
Found on http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/glossary/convection.html

convection

Atmospheric or oceanic motions that are predominately vertical and that result in vertical transport and mixing of atmospheric or oceanic properties. Because the most striking meteorological features result if atmospheric convective motion occurs in conjunction with the rising current of air (i.e., updrafts), convection is sometimes used to imply o...
Found on http://cdiac.ornl.gov/glossary.html

Convection

Convection involves the transfer of heat energy by means of vertical mass motions through a medium.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/c.html

Convection

Convection is the transfer of heat within a fluid (a gas or a liquid) by means of motion of the fluid (fluids are very poor conductors). In natural convection, currents of warm and cold fluid arise by virtue of the warmer parts being less dense than the cooler parts. Thus the warmer fluid rises and the colder fluid sinks under the influence of grav...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GC.HTM

convection

convection, mode of heat transfer in fluids (liquids and gases). Convection depends on the fact that, in general, fluids expand when heated and thus undergo a decrease in density (since a given volume of the fluid contains less matter at a higher temperature than at the original, lower temperature)....
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0813388.html

Convection

Currents created by heating air, which then rises and pulls cooler air behind it. Also see radiation
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Business/Construction/

convection

Fluid circulation driven by temperature gradients; the transfer of heat by this automatic circulation (see also Educator's Guide to Convection ).
Found on http://www.solarviews.com/eng/terms.htm

convection

Fluid motion which results from the action of unbalanced buoyancy forces.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20124

convection

Heat transfer through the movement of a fluid, eg: warm air rising
Found on http://www.fisicx.com/quickreference/science/glossary.html

convection

Heat transfer through the movement of a fluid, eg: warm air rising.
Found on http://www.quick-facts.co.uk/science/glossary.html

convection

Heat transport by moving particles, and the thermal energy that they carry, to a new location. compare conduction , radiation .
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22327

Convection

In meteorology the transference of heat by the movement of vertical currents in the atmosphere.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

Convection

In physics, convection is the transport and mixing of properties (energy, heat, moisture, etc.) of a fluid by mass motion of that fluid. In meteorology, convection generally refers to such transport and mixing in the vertical direction, and advection refers to processes in the horizontal plane.
Found on http://www.islandnet.com/~see/weather/general/wxgls_ad.htm#a
No exact match found