Burlesque

Burlesque is a literary, dramatic or musical work intended to cause laughter by caricaturing the manner or spirit of serious works, or by ludicrous treatment of their subjects. The word derives from the Italian burlesco, which, in turn, is derived from the Italian burla – a joke, ridicule or mockery. Burlesque overlaps in meaning with caricature...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burlesque

Burlesque

• (v. t.) To ridicule, or to make ludicrous by grotesque representation in action or in language. • (n.) A ludicrous imitation; a caricature; a travesty; a gross perversion. • (n.) An ironical or satirical composition intended to excite laughter, or to ridicule anything. • (a.) Tending to excite laughter or contempt by extravaga...
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burlesque

1. Ludicrous representation; exaggerated parody; grotesque satire. 'Burlesque is therefore of two kinds; the first represents mean persons in the accouterments of heroes, the other describes great persons acting and speaking like the basest among the people.' (Addison) ... 2. An ironical or satirical composition intended to excite laughter, or to r...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

burlesque

adjective relating to or characteristic of a burlesque; `burlesque theater`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Burlesque

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Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burlesque_(Richard_Strauss)

Burlesque

Bur·lesque' adjective [ French burlesque , from Italian burlesco , from burla jest, mockery, perhaps for burrula , dim. of Latin burrae trifles. See Bur .] Tending to excite laughter or contempt by extravagant images, or by a contrast between the subject and ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/115

burlesque

a theatrical entertainment of broad and earthy humor
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/249614

burlesque

a work caricaturing another serious work. An example is Samuel Butler's Hudibras.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Burlesque

A work caricaturing another serious work. An example is samuel butler's hudibras.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

Burlesque

A work that ridicules a topic by treating something exalted as if it were trivial or vice-versa. See
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

burlesque

burlesque (bûrlesk') [Ital.,=mockery], form of entertainment differing from comedy or farce in that it achieves its effects through caricature, ridicule, and distortion. It differs from satire in that it is devoid of any ethical element. The word first came into use in the 16th cent. in an ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0809515.html

burlesque

burlesque 1. A literary or dramatic work that ridicules a subject either by presenting a solemn subject in an undignified style or an inconsequential subject in a dignified style. 2. A ludicrous or mocking imitation; a travesty: 'The antics of the defense attorneys turned the trial into a burlesque of justice.' 3. A variety show characterized by ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3337/

Burlesque

Burlesque was a type of American theatre entertainment characterised by chorus-girl numbers interspersed with comedians and other acts. It started in the mid-1800s and became very popular in the early 1900s with stars such as Al Jolson, W. C. Fields, Sophie Tucker, Fannie Brice and strippers Gypsy Rose Lee and Sally Rand. It declined with the rise ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AB.HTM

Burlesque

Caricature or parody of a literary or dramatic work e.g. Hudibras by Samuel Butler or Baucis and Philemon by Jonathan Swift.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

burlesque

in literature, comic imitation of a serious literary or artistic form that relies on an extravagant incongruity between a subject and its treatment. ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/131

burlesque

In the 17th and 18th centuries, a form of satirical comedy parodying a particular play or dramatic genre. For example, John Gay's The Beggar's Opera (1728) is a burlesque of 18th-century opera,...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

burlesque

In the 17th and 18th centuries, a form of satirical comedy parodying a particular play or dramatic genre. For example, John Gay's The Beggar's Opera (1728) is a burlesque of 18th-century opera, and Richard Brinsley Sheridan's The Critic (1777) satirizes the sentimentality in contemporary drama. ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0018575.html

burlesque

[adj] - relating to or characteristic of a burlesque 2. [n] - a theatrical entertainment of broad and earthy humor
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=burlesque
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