acidity

  1. the property of being acidic
  2. the taste experience when something acidic is taken into the mouth
  3. pH values below 7

Acidity

Measured by pH. The lower the pH level, the higher the acidity of the measured substance. The higher the pH level, the lower the acidity of the measured substance. The acidity level is an important part of controlling spoilage in fermented sausages
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21759

Acidity

• (n.) The quality of being sour; sourness; tartness; sharpness to the taste; as, the acidity of lemon juice.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/acidity/

acidity

<chemistry> The quality of being acid or sour, containing acid (hydrogen ions). ... Origin: L. Aciditas ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

acidity

(ә-sid´ĭ-te) the quality of being acid; the power to unite with positively charged ions or with basic substances. excess acid quality, as of the gastric juice.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

acidity

(1) Of a compound: For Brønsted acids it means the tendency of a compound to act as a hydron donor. It can be quantitatively expressed by the acid dissociation constant of the compound in water or some other specified medium. For Lewis acids it relates to the association constants of Lewis adducts and -adducts. (2) Of a medium: The use of the term...
Found on http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/gtpoc/A.html

acidity

(from the article `The Environment`) ...reef tourism or fishing. Seawater is naturally alkaline, with an average pH of 8.2. (On the pH scale, values above 7 are alkaline, values below 7 ... ...and the expressions in brackets are the concentrations of the respective substances. The hydrogen ion concentration of the buffer solution is ......
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/12

acidity

acidulousness noun the taste experience when something acidic is taken into the mouth
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Acidity

A·cid'i·ty noun [ Latin acidites , from acidus : confer French acidité . See Acid .] The quality of being sour; sourness; tartness; sharpness to the taste; as, the acidity of lemon juice.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/19

Acidity

A naturally occurring component of every wine; the level of perceived sharpness; a key element to a wine
Found on http://www.wineonline.ie/library/glossary.htm

Acidity

A primary coffee sensation, created as the acids of a coffee combine with the natural sugars, to increase the overall sweetness of the coffee. A pleasant quality that points up to a coffee's flavour and provides a liveliness, sparkle, or snap to that drink. It is tasted mainly oo the tip of the tongue. The acidity of a coffee may be assessed as liv...
Found on http://www.realcoffee.co.uk/Article.html?Cat=Trivia&Page=4

acidity

A tart like taste component of wine caused by the presence of (primarily) tartaric and malic acid. Wines with insufficient acidity taste flat, while those with high acidity taste excessively tart. Wines high in acid generally age more slowly as aging reactions are retarded under high acid conditions.
Found on http://www.aromadictionary.com/articles/wineglossary_m-z_article.html

acidity

A wine's acidity should be detectable as a sharpness in the mouth, particularly around the front sides of the tongue. It should be neither too obvious nor absent. It provides a refreshing sensation in white wines, and balance in reds. Its absence makes a wine dull and 'flabby' - a defect in any wine, but a disaster in sweet wines which to me becom....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21497

acidity

acidity 1. The quality or state of being acid or sour; sourness, tartness, sharpness to the taste. 2. Thriving in a relatively acid environment; especially a reference to plants, requiring a pH well below 7. Synonyms: acidophilic, acidophilous, aciduric.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2369/2

Acidity

All wines naturally contain acids, which should be in proper balance with fruit and other components. Sufficient acidity gives liveliness and crispness and is critical for wines to age.
Found on http://www.sallys-place.com/beverages/wine/wine_glossery.htm

Acidity

Being part of the four basic savours of the sense of taste, acidity is detected on the sides of the tongue.
Found on http://www.hintsandthings.co.uk/livingroom/GlosssaryA.htm

Acidity

Created by the yeast fermentation process, the acids are perceived in the sake`s sourness and tanginess. The acidity counterbalances the sweetness of a sake so a high acidity will make the sake taste drier than it actually is. The range is usually from 0.9 to 2.0 with junmai and yamahai sake tending to fall in the higher end of the range.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21459

acidity

Describes the amount of acid in a substance. An acid is a chemical that gives off hydrogen ions in water and forms salts by combining with certain metals. Acidity is measured on a scale called the pH scale. On this scale, a pH value of 7 is neutral, and a pH value of less than 7 to 0 shows increasing acidity.
Found on http://www.cancer.gov/dictionary?expand=A

acidity

Description (also acid bite) for the taste a wine as part of a wine address, The most in this case dry developed wine is characterized by a relatively high proportion acid from, but that is to be understood as positive. Related terms are alive. resch. game (Acid play) and steely, A too high or inharmonious acid part becomes with the negatively occu...
Found on https://glossary.wein-plus.eu/acidity-3

Acidity

Grapes contain several acids, but the main ones are tartaric and malic. A little acidity in wine gives it a
Found on http://www.nebraskawines.com/wine-glossary/

Acidity

in lubricants, acidity denotes the presence of acid-type constituents whose concentration is usually defined in terms of total acid number. The constituents vary in nature and may or may not markedly influence the behavior of the lubricant.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21121

acidity

L. aciditas) the quality of being acid or sour; containing acid (hydrogen ions).
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio01.html

Acidity

Measured by pH. The lower the pH level, the higher the acidity of the measured substance. The higher the pH level, the lower the acidity of the measured substance. The acidity level is an important part of controlling spoilage in fermented sausages
Found on http://www.murrayscheese.com/meat_glossary.asp

Acidity

One of the essential elements in both grapes and finished wines. Acidity is necessary to keep any wine fresh. Ironically, acidity is perhaps most important in sweet wines, where it prevents then from being merely sickly-sweet.
Found on http://www.wine-pages.com/resources/glossary.html

acidity

One of the main keys to the lifespan of a wine. Too much acid can make the wine feel sharp and out of balance as well as adding a sour like impression to the flavors. Not enough, and the wine will likely be dull and flabby in the mouth. Many wines naturally have low acidity and others are naturally high in acid. Low, medium or high acid can work ve...
Found on http://www.supplewine.com/wine101/glossary/
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