XML

Extensible Markup Language. A meta-markup language that provides a format for describing structured data. This enables more precise declarations of content and more meaningful search results across multiple platforms.

XML

Extensible Markup Language defined by the W3C, The World Wide Web Consortium. A meta-language based on SGML that can be used to define a specific markup language like HTML and WML Compare ASN.1 and BNF. The X-world has become an alphabet soup of standards under the W3C, such as XHTML, XSL and XQuery. Many of them are involved with the wider concept of Web Services. ...

XML

Extensible Markup Language

XML

Extensible Markup Language - a new standard for marking up documents and data. It is based on SGML, but with a reduced feature set that is more appropriate for distribution via the Web. XML allows authors to create customised tags not available in HTML.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20134

XML

Extensible mark-up language, details ...
Found on http://www.cryer.co.uk/glossary/x/index.htm

XML

See Extensible Mark-up Language.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20195

XML

A way of formatting data so that it is both human and machine-readable. Stands for Extensible Meta Language.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20431

XML

eXtensible Markup Language. A re-defined version of SGML. It is seen as the successor of HTML. It enables the customising of tags which describes the layout and the very nature of data elements. It is very useful for sites maintaining large data volumes and on an intranet. Currently, only Microsoft Internet Explorer 5 and Netscape 6 offers support ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20441

XML

(eXtensible Markup Language) A restricted form of SGML designed (under the auspices of the World Wide Web Consortium â€` W3C) to enable generic SGML to be served, received, and processed on the Web in the way that is now possible with HTML. XML has been designed for ease of implementation and for interoperability with both SGML and HTML.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20462

XML

(In topic `Web Development`) XML (eXtensible Markup Language) is a richer and more dynamic successor to HTML that many believe has the potential to become the standard language for e-commerce. In XML-compliant information systems, data can be exchanged directly (ie computer to computer) even between different operating systems and data models.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20477

XML

Extensible markup language - used extensively in e-commerce, XML is a standard for data formats that is designed to enable different computer programs, including business software packages, to share and process data. XML uses a tag system that allows companies or trading communities wishing to exchange business information, to agree upon a standard...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20546

XML

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. It is classified as an extensible language because it allows its users to define their own tags. Its primary purpose is to facilitate the sharing of structured data across different information systems, particularly via the Internet.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20628

XML

eXtended Markup Language -- an expansion of HTML that includes dynamic content capability.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20660

XML

Extensible Mark-up Language; a meta-language containing a set of rules for construction of other mark-up languages. With XML, people can make up their own tags, which expands the amount and kinds of information that can be provided about the data held in the document. XML enables designers to create their own customised tags to provide functions no...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

XML

Short for Extensible Markup Language, a specification developed by the W3C. XML is a pared-down version of SGML, designed especially for Web documents. It allows designers to create their own customized tags, enabling the definition, transmission, validation, and interpretation of data between applications and between organizations.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20846

XML

eXxtensible Markup Language. This is an approach to developing data dictionaries. This is important in respect of systems integration where different systems are more likely to integrate together if they have the same data definitions for each data item involved.
Found on http://www.ft.com/dbglossary

XML

(from the article `computer programming language`) HTML does not allow one to define new text elements; that is, it is not extensible. XML (extensible markup language) is a simplified form of SGML ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/x/2

XML

XML A widely accepted way of sharing information over the internet in a way that computers can use, regardless of their operating system.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3991/10

XML

In computing, a simplified subset of SGML for defining languages for specific purposes or specific industries for use on the World Wide Web. XML is more powerful than HTML, because the formatting tags are user-defined, but less cumbersome than SGML. XML has been developed through the W3 Consortium, who published XML 1.0 in December 1997. XML pr...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0059419.html

XML

Extensible mark-up language. A next-generation Internet language that could, among other advantages, allow users to access the same Web site vial mobile phone, computer or other device. At present, access by different devices requires rewriting Web pages....
Found on http://www.oenb.at/dictionary/termini.jsp?EINTRAG_ID=13245

XML

See Extensible Markup Language.
Found on http://www.tedhaynes.com/newterms.html

XML

A widely used system for defining data formats. XML provides a very rich system to define complex documents and data structures such as invoices, molecular data, news feeds, glossaries, inventory descriptions, real estate properties, etc. As long as a programmer has the XML definition for a collection of data (often called a 'schema') then they ca....
Found on http://www.matisse.net/files/glossary.html

XML

Extensible Markup Language. A language designed specifically for Web documents which allows designers to create their own customised tags, enabling the definition, transmission, validation, and interpretation of data between applications and between organisations.
Found on http://www.gazettesubmissions.co.uk/Glossary.xhtml

xml

XML (extensible Markup Language) is a `language” that provides a way to create, maintain and exchange structured documents in plain text that can be rendered in a variety of different ways. XML is emerging as a de facto standard to exchange information over disparate systems.
Found on http://www.trisystemssoftware.com/jargonbuster/glossary

XML

(Extensible Markup Language) A set of rules for encoding documents and data that goes beyond HTML capacities. Whereas HTML is generally concerned with the semantic structure of documents, XML allows other information to be defined and passed such as , , , , for a c...
Found on http://www.journalism.co.uk/terms-definitions-dictionary-terminology-words/
No exact match found